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Community Vision 2040cupertino general plan Community Vision 2015-2040 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS CITY COUNCIL Barry Chang, Mayor Savita Vaidhyanathan, Vice Mayor Rod Sinks, Council Member Gilbert Wong, Council Member Darcy Paul, Council Member Orrin Mahoney, Council Member (former) Mark Santoro, Council Member (former) PLANNING COMMISSION Winnie Lee, Chair Alan Takahashi, Vice Chair Margaret Gong, Commissioner Don Sun, Commissioner Geoffrey Paulsen, Commissioner CITY STAFF David Brandt, City Manager Aarti Shrivastava, Assistant City Manager/Community Development Director Carol Korade, City Attorney Colleen Winchester, Assistant City Attorney Gary Chao, Assistant Community Development Director Piu Ghosh, Principal Planner Rebecca Tolentino, Senior Planner Christopher Valenzuela, Senior Planner George Schroeder, Associate Planner Ellen Yau, Assistant Planner Angela Tsui, Economic Development Manager Carol Atwood, Director of Recreation and Community Services Rick Kitson, Director of Public Affairs Timm Borden, Public Works Director Albert Salvador, Building Official Chad Mosely, Senior Civil Engineer David Stillman, Senior Traffic Engineer Teri Gerhardt, GIS Manager Adam Araza, GIS Department Aki Snelling Alex Wykoff Andrea Sanders Alyssa Carlsen Beth Ebben Cheri Donnelly Chylene Osborne Colleen Lettire Diana Pancholi Donna Henriques Erick Serrano Erin Cooke Erwin Ching Gian Paolo Martire Grace Schmidt Hella Sanders Jeff Greef Julia Kinst Kaitie Groeneweg Kirsten Squarcia Kristina Alfaro Louis Sarmiento Melissa Names Melissa Tronquet Michelle Combs Pete Coglianese Rei Delgado Robert Kim Ron Bullock Ryan Roman Simon Vuong Stephen Rose Sylvia Mendez Tiffanie Cardena Tiffany Brown Winnie Pagan CITY STAFF (Community Outreach)CONSULTANT TEAM MIG, INC. Daniel Iacofano, CEO/Principal Chris Beynon, Principal Laura Stetson, Principal Dan Amsden, Senior Project Manager Ellie Fiore, Outreach and Policy Specialist Genevieve Sharrow, Project Manager Jeff Liljegren, Project Associate Marissa Reilly, Project Associate Sydney Cespedes, Project Associate Jamillah Jordan, Project Associate Lillian Jacobson, Project Associate BAE URBAN ECONOMICS Janet Smith-Heimer, President David Shiver, Principal Ray Kennedy, Vice President Stephanie Hagar, Senior Associate GREENSFELDER CRE David Greensfelder, Managing Principal VERONICA TAM & ASSOCIATES Veronica Tam, Principal Jessica Suimanjaya, Associate PLACEWORKS Steve Noack, Principal Terri McCracken, Senior Associate HEXAGON TRANSPORTATION Gary Black, President Jill Hough, Vice President AMENDMENTS TO GENERAL PLAN COMMUNITY VISION 2015-2040 Date Ordinance Number Description 10/20/2015 CC 15-087 Amendment to the Community Vision 2040 policy, text, and figures pertaining to citywide issues, and a change to the general plan land use map to modify the land use designation of one property located at 10950 N Blaney Avenue from Industrial/Residential to Industrial/Commercial/Residential. CONTENTS CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION..................................................................I-1 Purpose of Community Vision 2040...............................................................I-2 Vision Statement...................................................................................................I-3 Guiding Principles.................................................................................................I-4 Organization of the Document..........................................................................I-6 Community Vision 2040 Adoption...................................................................I-7 Community Vision 2040 Implementation......................................................I-8 CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS.........................................................PA-1 Introduction..............................................................................................................PA-2 Special Areas...........................................................................................................PA-3 Neighborhoods..................................................................................PA-16 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT........LU-1 Introduction..............................................................................................................LU-2 Context.......................................................................................................................LU-3 Looking Forward.....................................................................................................LU-8 Citywide Goals and Policies..............................................................................LU-10 Planning Area Goals and Policies................................................................LU-40 CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT.......................................................HE-1 Introduction.............................................................................................................HE-2 Housing Needs Assessment............................................................................. HE-4 Regional Housing Needs and Allocations...................................................HE-14 Housing Resources.............................................................................................HE-15 Housing Plan..........................................................................................................HE-18 Qualified Objectives.............................................................................................HE-19 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT.........................................................M-1 Introduction................................................................................................................M-2 Context.........................................................................................................................M-3 Looking Forward.....................................................................................................M-12 Goals and Policies..................................................................................................M-13 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES ELEMENT.........................ES-1 Introduction.....................................................................................................................ES-2 Context..............................................................................................................................ES-3 Looking Forward........................................................................................................ES-12 Goals and Policies........................................................................................................ES-13 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT.......................................HS-1 Introduction.....................................................................................................................HS-2 Context..............................................................................................................................HS-3 Looking Forward........................................................................................................HS-24 Goals and Policies......................................................................................................HS-25 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT...........................................INF-1 Introduction....................................................................................................................INF-2 Context.............................................................................................................................INF-3 Looking Forward..........................................................................................................INF-7 Goals and Policies.....................................................................................................INF-9 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE ELEMENT.................................................................................RPC-1 Introduction..................................................................................................................RPC-2 Context...........................................................................................................................RPC-3 Looking Forward......................................................................................................RPC-18 Goals and Policies....................................................................................................RPC-20 TECHNICAL APPENDICES Appendix A: Land Use Definitions...............................................................................A-1 Appendix B: Housing Element Technical Report..................................................B-1 Appendix C: Air Quality....................................................................................................C-1 Appendix D: Community Noise Fundamentals......................................................D-1 Appendix E: Geologic and Seismic Hazards............................................................E-1 Appendix F: Slope Density.............................................................................................F-1 1introduction CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) I-2 Community Vision 2040 is a roadmap to the future that encompasses the hopes, aspirations, values and dreams of the Cupertino community. The underlying purpose of this document is to establish the policy and regulatory framework necessary to build a great community that serves the needs of its residents, maximizes the sense of connection between neighborhoods and enhances Cupertino as a great place to live, work, visit and play. Community Vision 2040 provides a framework for integrating the aspirations of residents, businesses, property owners and public officials into a comprehensive strategy for guiding future development and managing change. It describes long-term goals and guides daily decision making by the City Council and appointed commissions. This document functions as the City of Cupertino’s State-mandated General Plan, and covers a time frame of 2015–2040. As such, the goals, policies and strategies contained in this document lay the foundation for ensuring there is appropriate land use and community design, transportation networks, housing, environmental resources and municipal services established between now and 2040. Due to the breadth of topics covered in Community Vision 2040, conflicts between mutually-desirable goals are inevitable. For instance, increased automobile mobility may conflict with a safe, walkable community. This document reconciles these conflicts in the interest of building a cohesive community. Per State law, every goal and policy in this plan has equal weight. The City recognizes that the interests of residents of a particular street or neighborhood may need to be balanced with the overall needs and potentially greater goal of building a community. These are conscious choices that the City makes in the interest of building community. Purpose of Community Vision 2040 CONTENTS: I-2 Purpose of Community Vision 2040 I-3 Vision Statement I-4 Guiding Principles I-6 Organization of the Document I-7 Community Vision 2040 Adoption I-8 Community Vision 2040 Implementation CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) In order to prioritize goals and actions, the City developed an overarching vision statement based on extensive community input received during the 2013-14 General Plan Amendment process. This input culminated in “A Vision for Cupertino”, shown below, which reflects ideas, thoughts and desires from residents, local business and property owners, study area stakeholders, elected and appointed officials, and other members of the Cupertino community. This updated vision expresses the community’s desires for Cupertino’s future. It describes the community’s overall philosophy regarding the character and accessibility of existing and new neighborhoods and mixed-use corridors. Ultimately, all goals, policies and strategies contained in this document must be consistent with the vision statement. Cupertino aspires to be a balanced community with quiet and attractive residential neighborhoods; exemplary parks and schools; accessible open space areas, hillsides and creeks; and a vibrant, mixed-use “Heart of the City.” Cupertino will be safe, friendly, healthy, connected, walkable, bikeable and inclusive for all residents and workers, with ample places and opportunities for people to interact, recreate, innovate and collaborate. I-3 VISION STATEMENT A Vision for Cupertino CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) I-4 The Guiding Principles provide additional detail about Cupertino’s desired future necessary to fully articulate the ideas contained in the vision statement. Similarly, the Guiding Principles were developed based on extensive community input. GUIDING PRINCIPLES 1 2 3 4 5 6 SUPPORT VIBRANT AND MIXED-USE BUSINESSES Ensure that Cupertino’s major mixed-use corridors and commercial nodes are vibrant, successful, attractive, friendly and comfortable with inviting active pedestrian spaces and services that meet the daily needs of residents and workers. ENSURE A BALANCED COMMUNITY Offer residents a full range of housing choices necessary to accommodate the changing needs of a demographically and economically diverse population, while also providing a full range of support uses including regional and local shopping, education, employment, entertainment, recreation, and daily needs that are within easy walking distance. ENHANCE MOBILITY Ensure the efficient and safe movement of cars, trucks, transit, pedestrians, bicyclists and disabled persons throughout Cupertino in order to fully accommodate Cupertino’s residents, workers, visitors and students of all ages and abilities. Streets, pedestrian paths and bike paths should comprise an integrated system of fully connected and interesting routes to all destinations. IMPROVE CONNECTIVITY Create a well-connected and safe system of trails, pedestrian and bicycle paths, sidewalks and streets with traffic calming measures that weave the community together, enhance neighborhood pride and identity, and create access to interesting routes to different destinations. IMPROVE PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY Promote public health by increasing community-wide access to healthy foods; ensure an adequate amount of safe, well-designed parks, open space, trails and pathways; and improve safety by ensuring all areas of the community are protected from natural hazards and fully served by disaster planning and neighborhood watch programs, police, fire, paramedic and health services. DEVELOP COHESIVE NEIGHBORHOODS Ensure that all neighborhoods are safe, attractive and include convenient pedestrian and bicycle access to a “full-service” of local amenities such as parks, schools, community activity centers, trails, bicycle paths and shopping. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) I-5 7 8 9 10 11 ENSURE A RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT Continue to be a regional leader in accessible and transparent municipal government; promote community leadership and local partnerships with local and regional agencies; and remain flexible and responsive to changing community needs. ENSURE FISCAL SELF RELIANCE Maintain fiscal self-reliance in order to protect the City’s ability to deliver essential, high-quality municipal services and facilities to the community. PRESERVE THE ENVIRONMENT Preserve Cupertino’s environment by enhancing or restoring creeks and hillsides to their natural state, limiting urban uses to existing urbanized areas, encouraging environmental protection, promoting sustainable design concepts, improving sustainable municipal operations, adapting to climate change, conserving energy resources and minimizing waste. SUPPORT EDUCATION Preserve and support quality community education by partnering with local school districts, community colleges, libraries and other organizations to improve facilities and programs that enhance learning and expand community-wide access. EMBRACE DIVERSITY Celebrate Cupertino’s diversity by offering a range of housing, shopping and community programs that meet the needs of the full spectrum of the community, while ensuring equal opportunities for all residents and workers regardless of age, cultural or physical differences. ENSURE ATTRACTIVE COMMUNITY DESIGN Ensure that buildings, landscapes, streets and parks are attractively designed and well maintained so they can complement the overall community fabric by framing streets and offering a variety of active, relaxing and intimate pedestrian spaces. 12 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Every General Plan is also required to address a collection of seven “elements” or subject categories. The City has the authority to address these elements in whatever organization makes the most sense for Cupertino. The following table identifies how the sections of the plan address each State-required element. Community Vision 2040 Chapters State-Required Topics or Elements 1. Introduction Not Applicable 2. Planning Areas Not Applicable 3. Land Use and Community Design Land Use 4. Housing Housing 5. Mobility Circulation 6. Environmental Resources and Sustainability Conservation, Open Space 7. Health and Safety Noise, Safety 8. Public Infrastructure (optional element) 9. Recreation and Community Services (optional element) Each topical chapter, or “Element,” of Community Vision 2040 includes an introduction, background context and information, and a summary of key opportunities or objectives looking forward. They also include topical goals, policies and strategies that function in three unique ways: • Goal: a broad statement of values or aspirations needed to achieve the vision. • Policy: a more precise statement that guides the actions of City staff, developers and policy makers necessary to achieve the goal. • Strategy: a specific task that the City will undertake to implement the policy and work toward achieving the goals. I-6 California state law requires that each city and county adopt a General Plan for the “physical development of the county or city, and any land outside its boundaries which bears relation to its planning.” The role of the General Plan is to act as a community’s “constitution,” a basis for rational decisions regarding long-term physical development and incremental change. Community Vision 2040 expresses the community’s development and conservation goals, and embodies public policy relative to the distribution of future land uses, both public and private. ORGANIZATION OF THE PLAN CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) I-7 Community Vision 2040 is a living document, and can be adopted or modified over time as community needs change. Each amendment needs to include a public review process and environmental impact analysis. Public review occurs prior to public hearings through community meetings, study sessions and advisory committee meetings. Public hearings allow the community to express its views prior to City Council approval. State law limits the number of General Plan amendments to four per year. Cupertino ordinances require that the City Council determine if a public hearing should be set to consider a General Plan amendment. COMMUNITY VISION 2040 ADOPTION CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) I-8 Community Vision 2040 is the foundation for planning in Cupertino. All physical development must be consistent with it. State law also requires that zoning be consistent with the plan. The various goals, policies and strategies are carried out through a myriad of City plans and approval procedures, such as special planning areas, use permits, subdivisions, the Capital Improvement Program and park planning. The annual review of Community Vision 2040 provides the opportunity to evaluate the City’s progress in implementing the plan and to assess if mitigation measures are being followed and if new policy direction should be considered. COMMUNITY VISION 2040 IMPLEMENTATION 2planning areas 2planning areas CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-2 Cupertino benefits from having many established and vibrant areas—each with its own unique function, character, uses and services. Community Vision 2040 organizes the city into 21 distinct Planning Areas, divided into two categories: 1. Special Areas that are expected to transition over the life of the General Plan 2. Neighborhoods where future changes are expected to be minimal This chapter provides an overview of each Planning Area, including its current context and future vision. Specific goals, policies and strategies for each area are included in the various topical elements of the General Plan (i.e., Chapters 3 through 9). Introduction CONTENTS: PA-2 Introduction PA-3 Special Areas Heart of the City Vallco Shopping District North Vallco Park North De Anza South De Anza Homestead Bubb Road Monta Vista Village Other Non-Residential/Mixed- Use Are as PA-16 Neighborhoods Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Rancho Rinconada Fairgrove CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Cupertino is defined by its four major roadways: Homestead Road, Wolfe Road, De Anza Boulevard and Stevens Creek Boulevard. These major mixed-use corridors have been the center of retail, commercial, office and multi-family housing in Cupertino for decades. They act as the “spines” of the community–connecting residential neighborhoods to major employment centers, schools and colleges, civic uses, parks, highways and freeways, and adjacent cities. In order to support local and regional commercial, office and housing needs, each of these corridors must be improved. They should be enhanced with more pedestrian, bicycle and transit facilities; supported by focused development standards; and encouraged to redevelop in order to meet the current and future needs of the community. As shown in Figure PA-1, there are nine Special Areas within Cupertino. Each Special Area is located along one of the four major mixed-use corridors in the city, which represent key areas within Cupertino where future development and reinvestment will be focused. The following is a summary of the location, major characteristics, uses and vision for each of the city’s nine Special Areas. PA-3 SPECIAL AREAS CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-1 Figure PA-1 SPECIAL AREAS PA-4 North Vallco Park Special Area Heart of the City Special Area South De Anza Special Area North De Anza Special Area Homestead Special Area Vallco Shopping District Special Area Bubb Road Special Area Monta Vista Village Special Area west crossroads central east South Vallco Park Gateway City Center Node Oaks Gateway North Crossroads Node North Vallco Gateway Stelling Gateway North De Anza Gateway Civic Center Node De Anza College Node Community Recreation Node Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Special Areas Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Heart of the City Vallco Shopping District North Vallco Park North De Anza South De Anza Homestead Bubb Road Monta Vista Village CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-5 HEART OF THE CITY CONTEXT The Heart of the City Special Area is a key mixed-use, commercial corridor in Cupertino. The area encompasses approximately 635 acres along Stevens Creek Boulevard between Highway 85 and the eastern city limit. Development within this Special Area is guided by the Heart of the City Specific Plan which is intended to create a greater sense of place, more community identity, and a positive and memorable experience for residents, workers and visitors of Cupertino. The Heart of the City Specific Plan area includes five specific subareas, each with unique characteristics, land uses and streetscape elements. The subareas include: West Stevens Creek Boulevard; Crossroads; Central Stevens Creek Boulevard; City Center; and East Stevens Creek Boulevard. The West Stevens Creek Boulevard subarea is located between Highway 85 and Stelling Road. The primary use for this area is quasi-public/public facilities, with supporting uses including mixed commercial/residential. The De Anza College Node defines the southern half of the West Stevens Creek Boulevard subarea. Also included within this area are the Oaks Gateway and Community Recreation Node consisting of Memorial Park, the Senior Center, Sports Center and Quinlan Community Center. The Crossroads subarea is located between Stelling Road and De Anza Boulevard and is the historic core of Cupertino. This area consists of specialty shops, grocery stores and restaurants that form a strong central focal point. The primary use in this area is commercial/retail, with commercial office above the ground level allowed as a secondary use. Limited residential is also allowed as a supporting use per the Housing Element. The North Crossroads Node encompasses the northern half of the subarea. The Central Stevens Creek Boulevard subarea is located on the north side of Stevens Creek Boulevard between De Anza Boulevard and Torre Avenue, and on the north and south sides of Stevens Creek Boulevard between Torre Avenue and Portal Avenue. The primary use for this area is commercial/commercial office, with office above ground level as the secondary use. Residential/ residential mixed uses are allowed as a supporting use. CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-6 The City Center subarea is located south of the Central Stevens Creek Boulevard subarea, between De Anza and Torre Avenue/Regnart Creek. The primary use for this area is office/residential/hotel/public facilities/commercial retail/mixed- uses. This subarea is further defined into the City Center Node and Civic Center Node. The City Center Node includes Cali Plaza. The Civic Center Node includes City Hall, Cupertino Community Hall, Cupertino Public Library, as well as the Library Plaza and Library Field. The East Stevens Creek Boulevard subarea is located at the east end of the Heart of the City Specific Plan area and extends from Portal Avenue to the eastern city limit. The area is largely defined by the South Vallco Park Gateway immediately east of the Vallco Shopping District, which includes Nineteen 800 (formerly known as Rosebowl), The Metropolitan and Main Street developments. This area is intended as a regional commercial district with retail/commercial/ office as the primary uses. Office above ground level retail is allowed as a secondary use, with residential/residential mixed-use as a supporting use per the Housing Element. VISION The Heart of the City area will continue being a focus of commerce, community identity, social gathering and pride for Cupertino. The area is envisioned as a tree-lined boulevard that forms a major route for automobiles, but also supports walking, biking and transit. Each of its five subareas will contribute their distinctive and unique character, and will provide pedestrian and bicycle links to adjacent neighborhoods through side street access, bikeways and pathways. While portions of the area is designated as a Priority Development Area (PDA), which allows some higher intensity near gateways and nodes, development will continue to support the small town ambiance of the community. The Stevens Creek Boulevard corridor will continue to function as Cupertino’s main mixed- use, commercial and retail corridor. Residential uses, as allowed per the Housing Element, should be developed in the “mixed-use village” format described later in the Land Use and Community Design Element. CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-7 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM STEVENS CREEK BLVD DE ANZA BLVDWOLFE RDSTELLING RDBLANEY AVETANTAU AVE81 81 26 23 55 25 53 55 25 54 26 51 53 23 55 323 323 101 101 182 323 280 LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM De Anza College The Oaks Cupertino Memorial Park City Center Public Facilities Neighborhood Center Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM HEART OF THE CITY SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-8 The Vallco Shopping District Special Area encompasses Cupertino’s most significant commercial center, formerly known as the Vallco Fashion Park. This Special Area is located between Interstate 280 and Stevens Creek Boulevard in the eastern part of the city. The North Blaney neighborhood, an established single-family area, is adjacent on the west side of the Vallco Shopping District. Wolfe Road bisects the area in a north-south direction, and divides Vallco Shopping District into distinct subareas: Vallco Shopping District Gateway West and Vallco Shopping District Gateway East. In recent years there has been some façade improvement to the Vallco Fashion Mall; however, there has been no major reinvestment in the mall for decades. Reinvestment is needed to upgrade or replace older buildings and make other improvements so that this commercial center is more competitive and better serves the community. Currently, the major tenants of the mall include a movie theater, bowling alley and three national retailers. The Vallco Shopping District is identified as a separate Special Area given its prominence as a regional commercial destination and its importance to future planning/redevelopment efforts expected over the life of the General Plan. VISION The Vallco Shopping District will continue to function as a major regional and community destination. The City envisions this area as a new mixed-use “town center” and gateway for Cupertino. It will include an interconnected street grid network of bicycle and pedestrian-friendly streets, more pedestrian-oriented buildings with active uses lining Stevens Creek Boulevard and Wolfe Road, and publicly-accessible parks and plazas that support the pedestrian- oriented feel of the revitalized area. New development in the Vallco Shopping District should be required to provide buffers between adjacent single-family neighborhoods in the form of boundary walls, setbacks, landscaping or building transitions. VALLCO SHOPPING DISTRICT CONTEXT Quasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU/Ac.) Residential Land U se Designations Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential Non-Res idential Land Use Designations Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/Ac.) Transportation High Density (>35 DU/Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (0-4.4 DU/Ac.) 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards Avenues Neighborhood Connectors Neighborhood Center Commercial Center Employment Center Education/Cultural Center Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential Office/�nd�strial/Commercial/Residential �nd�strial/Residential �nd�strial/Commercial/Residential Public Facilities Quasi-Public Commercial/Office/Residential Parks and Open Space ��asi����lic/�nstit�tional Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 LEGEND Commercial/Office/Residential 81 26 23 101 101 182 323 26 280 WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD VALLCO SHOPPING DISTRICT SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM Quasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU/Ac.) Residential Land Use Designatio ns Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential Non-Residential Land Use Designati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/Ac.) Transportation High Density (>35 DU /Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (0-4.4 DU/Ac.) 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards Avenues Neighborhood Connectors Neighborhood Center Commercial Center Employment Center Education/Cultural Center Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential Office/�nd�strial/Commercial/Residential �nd�strial/Residential �nd�strial/Commercial/Residential Public Facilities Quasi-Public Commercial/Office/Residential Parks and Open Space ��asi����lic/�nstit�tional Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 LEGEND Commercial/Office/Residential 81 26 23 101 101 182 323 26 280 WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-9 NORTH VALLCO PARK SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM The North Vallco Park Special Area encompasses 240 acres and is an important employment center for Cupertino and the region. The area is bounded by Homestead Road to the north and Interstate 280 to the south. The eastern edge is defined by the properties that line the eastern frontage of Tantau Avenue, and the western edge includes the commercial development west of Wolfe Road. The North Vallco Gateway is located within this Planning Area, and includes a medium-density multi-family residential project east of Wolfe Road and two hotels and the Cupertino Village Shopping Center west of Wolfe Road. Cupertino Village offers cafes and restaurants for nearby workers and serves as a village center for the residential uses in this area. The remainder of the Planning Area is defined by the new Apple Campus 2 development located on the east side of Wolfe Road. VISION The North Vallco Park area is envisioned to become a sustainable office and campus environment surrounded by a mix of connected, high-quality and pedestrian- oriented neighborhood center, hotels and residential uses. Taller heights may be allowed in the North Vallco Gateway per the Land Use and Community Design Element and additional residential development may be allowed per the Housing Element. NORTH VALLCO PARK CONTEXT Quasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU/Ac.) Resi dential Land Use Designatio ns Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public Facilities City Bound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential No n-Res ident ial Land Use Designati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/Ac.) Transportation High Density (>35 DU /Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Us e Designations Residential (0-4.4 DU/A c.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 01000 0500 20003000 00.51Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Calabazas Creek 81 26 182 81 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM 280WOLFE RDTANTAU AVEHOMESTEAD RD Apple Campus II Neighborhood Center PR U N E R I D G E A V E Quasi-P ublic / Commercial Medi um (10-20 DU /Ac.) Resi dential Land U se Designatio ns Medi um / High Density (20-35 DU/A c.) Public F acilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential No n-Res ident ial Land Use Desig nati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/A c.) Transportation High Dens ity (>35 DU/Ac.) Nei ghborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Us e Desig nat ions Resident ial (0-4.4 DU/A c.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUES AVE PACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 01000 0500 20003000 00.51Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Calabazas Creek 81 26 182 81 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM 280WOLFE RDTANTAU AVEHOMESTEAD RD Apple Campus II Neighborhood Center P R U N E R I D G E A V E CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-10 The North De Anza Special Area encompasses 150 acres and includes the portion of North De Anza Boulevard generally between Interstate 280 and Stevens Creek Boulevard. De Anza Boulevard bisects the area in a north-south direction. The area predominantly consists of office and campus uses with come commercial and hotel service uses. The street network in this area provides connections from the Garden Gate neighborhood to schools and services on the east side of De Anza Boulevard. VISION The North De Anza area is expected to remain a predominantly office area. However, its designation as a Priority Development Area (PDA), and increase in foot traffic due to workers taking advantage of restaurants and services in the Heart of the City Planning Area, opens opportunities to locate higher density office uses along the corridor. This would include better connections to uses along Stevens Creek Boulevard in order to make the environment more pedestrian and bicycle-friendly. Streets in this area are envisioned to function as a walkable, bikeable grid that enhances connections for school children and residents from the Garden Gate neighborhood to Lawson Middle School and other services on the east side. NORTH DE ANZA CONTEXT Quasi-P ublic / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU/Ac.) Resi dential Land Use Designations Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential No n-Resident ial Land Use Designati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/A c.) Transportation Hig h Density (>35 DU/Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Us e Desig nat ions Residential (0-4.4 DU/Ac.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary ���ere o� In�uence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary ���ere o� In�uence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential Office/Industrial/Commercial/Residential Industrial/Residential Industrial/Commercial/Residential Public Facilities Quasi-Public Commercial/Office/Residential Parks and Open Space Quasi-Public/Institutional Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential Commercial/Office/Residential LEGEND Office/Industrial/Commercial/Residential Quasi-Public/Institutional Overlay 280 55 182 AppleInc DE ANZA BLVDBANDLEY DRNORTH DE ANZA SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM Quasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU /Ac.) Resi dential Land U se Designatio ns Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/A c.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formul a) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential No n-Res ident ial Land Use Designati ons Low / Medium Densi ty (5-10 DU/A c.) Transportation Hig h Density (>35 DU /Ac.) Neighborhood Commerci al / Residential Monta V ista Land Us e Desig nat ions Resident ial (0-4.4 DU/A c.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary ���ere o� In�uence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 01000 0500 20003000 00.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary ���ere o� In�uence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential Office/Industrial/Commercial/Residential Industrial/Residential Industrial/Commercial/Residential Public Facilities Quasi-Public Commercial/Office/Residential Parks and Open Space Quasi-Public/Institutional Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential Commercial/Office/Residential LEGEND Office/Industrial/Commercial/Residential Quasi-Public/Institutional Overlay 280 55 182 Apple Inc DE ANZA BLVDBANDLEY DR CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-11 The South De Anza Special Area encompasses the portion of South De Anza Boulevard between Stevens Creek Boulevard and Bollinger Road, and the western portion of South De Anza Boulevard between Highway 85 and Prospect Road. The South De Anza Boulevard Conceptual Plan establishes land uses, standards and guidelines for development and change of use for properties located within this Planning Area. VISION The South De Anza area will remain a predominantly general commercial area with supporting existing mixed residential uses. The policies in this area are intended to encourage lot consolidation (in order to resolve the fragmented and narrow lot pattern), promote active retail and service uses, and improve bike and pedestrian connectivity to adjacent neighborhoods. For parcels that are not appropriately-located or configured to accommodate successful retail, commercial and commercial/office uses may be allowed in accordance with the City Municipal Code. SOUTH DE ANZA CONTEXT SOUTH DE ANZA SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM Quasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU/Ac.) Residential Land Use Designatio ns Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public F acilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Resident ial Non-Res ident ial Land Use Designati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/A c.) Transportation High Density (>35 DU/Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Use Designations Resident ial (0-4.4 DU/Ac.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 01000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Quasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU/Ac.) Residential Land Use Designatio ns Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public F acilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Resident ial Non-Res ident ial Land Use Designati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/A c.) Transportation High Density (>35 DU/Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Use Designations Resident ial (0-4.4 DU/Ac.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 01000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 55 25 53 55 25 53 DE ANZA BLVDRegnart Creek Neighborhood Center DE ANZA BLVDQuasi-P ublic / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU /Ac.) Resi dential Land U se Designatio ns Medium / High Densi ty (20-35 DU/A c.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formul a) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Resident ial No n-Res ident ial Land Use Desig nati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/Ac.) Transportation Hig h Density (>35 DU /Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Use Designat ions Residential (0-4.4 DU/A c.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Quasi-P ublic / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU /Ac.) Resi dential Land U se Designatio ns Medium / High Densi ty (20-35 DU/A c.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formul a) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Resident ial No n-Res ident ial Land Use Desig nati ons Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/Ac.) Transportation Hig h Density (>35 DU /Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Use Designat ions Residential (0-4.4 DU/A c.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 55 25 53 55 25 53 DE ANZA BLVDRegnart Creek Neighborhood Center DE ANZA BLVDQuasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU /Ac.) Resi dential Land U se Designations Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential No n-Residential Land Use Desig nations Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/Ac.) Transportation High Density (>35 DU /Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Us e Desig nat ions Residential (0-4.4 DU/A c.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 01000 0500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Quasi-Public / Commercial Medium (10-20 DU /Ac.) Resi dential Land U se Designations Medium / High Density (20-35 DU/Ac.) Public Facilities City B ound ary Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) Parks and Open Space Land Use Map Commercial / Residential No n-Residential Land Use Desig nations Low / Medium Density (5-10 DU/Ac.) Transportation High Density (>35 DU /Ac.) Neighborhood Commercial / Residential Monta V ista Land Us e Desig nat ions Residential (0-4.4 DU/A c.)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUE S A V EPACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak ValleyCreston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 01000 0500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary 4QIFSFPG*OˍVFODF Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 55 25 53 55 25 53 DE ANZA BLVDRegnart Creek Neighborhood Center DE ANZA BLVD CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-12 The Homestead Special Area is located in the northern portion of the city and includes residential, commercial, office and hotel uses along Homestead Road, between Interstate 280 and the Sunnyvale city limit. This major mixed- use corridor continues to be a predominantly mixed-use area with a series of neighborhood commercial centers and multi-family housing. The northern portion of this corridor is in Sunnyvale and is lined mostly with commercial and lower-intensity residential uses. Additional commercial uses include a hotel along De Anza Boulevard within the North De Anza Gateway. The Stelling Gateway, which consists primarily of commercial and residential uses, is also located in this area. Community facilities within the Homestead Planning Area include Franco Park and Homestead High School. The Apple Campus 2 project is located at the eastern end of this corridor in the North Vallco Park Planning Area and is a major regional employment center. VISION The Homestead area will continue to be a predominantly mixed-use area with residential uses and a series of neighborhood centers providing services to local residents. Bike and pedestrian improvements in this area will provide better connections for residents and workers to access services. Tree-lined streets and sidewalks will provide an inviting environment and will link existing and new uses. HOMESTEAD CONTEXT HOMESTEAD SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM 280 DE ANZA BLVDSTELLING RDHOMESTEAD RD BLANEY AVEHomestead Square Shopping Center Oakmont Square PG&E Franco Park 182 101 55 55 LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Neighborhood Center Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM 280 DE ANZA BLVDSTELLING RDHOMESTEAD RD BLANEY AVEHomestead Square Shopping Center Oakmont Square PG&E Franco Park 182 101 55 55 LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Neighborhood Center Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM 280 DE ANZA BLVDSTELLING RDHOMESTEAD RD BLANEY AVEHomestead Square Shopping Center Oakmont Square PG&E Franco Park 182 101 55 55 LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Neighborhood Center Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-13 The Bubb Road Special Area is located south of Stevens Creek Boulevard between the Southern Pacific railroad tracks and Highway 85, on the north side of McClellan Road. This area is approximately 30 acres in size and consists primarily of low-rise industrial and research and development uses. The area is adjacent to Monta Vista Village to the west, Monta Vista North neighborhood to the south, and the mixed-use area of Monta Vista Village to the north. This area is one of the few existing industrial areas in Cupertino. VISION The Bubb Road area is envisioned to become a tree-lined avenue that is more bike and pedestrian friendly. It will have an improved street grid necessary to accommodate increased foot traffic from local workers, and school children from the northern and eastern sections of Cupertino who travel to the tri-school area. Allowed uses in the Bubb Road Planning Area consist of those described in the ML-RC ordinance. In addition, neighborhood commercial and limited residential uses will continue to be allowed. Non-industrial uses in this area should be carefully reviewed to ensure that they do not impact the operations of existing industrial uses in this area. Development directly abutting low-intensity residential use should provide appropriate landscape buffers and setbacks. BUBB ROAD CONTEXT BUBB ROAD SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM 85 STEVENS CREEK BLVD MCCLELLAN RDBUBB RDLEGEND Public Facilities Industrial/Commercial/Residential 85 STEVENS CREEK BLVD MCCLELLAN RDBUBB RDLEGEND Public Facilities Industrial/Commercial/Residential CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-14 The Monta Vista Village Special Area is an older neighborhood which served as an attractive farming and second home community since the late 1800s. It includes several important points of historic interest. Uses in this area consist of mixed neighborhood commercial, small commercial office, and multi-family and single-family residential uses. The area was incrementally annexed by the City starting in the 1960s, ending with complete annexation in 2004, from the unincorporated Santa Clara County. Roadway and utility infrastructure in a portion of this area needs upgrading and improvements. Monta Vista Village has a small town character and provides necessary services to the adjacent Monta Vista North and South neighborhoods. The streets within this area serve as a travel route for school children to the tri-school area in Monta Vista (Lincoln Elementary, Kennedy Middle and Monta Vista High Schools). VISION Monta Vista Village’s small town character as a pedestrian-oriented, small scaled, mixed-use residential, neighborhood commercial and industrial area will be retained and enhanced with new development and redevelopment. Improved pedestrian and bicycle access within the Area and to adjacent neighborhoods will promote the concept of complete, connected and walkable neighborhoods and improve travel routes to the tri-school area in Monta Vista. MONTA VISTA VILLAGE CONTEXT MONTA VISTA VILLAGE SPECIAL AREA DIAGRAM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Quasi-Public/Institutional Overlay STEVENS CREEK BLVD BUBB RDMCCLELLAN RD Post Office 51 Neighborhood Center Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Quasi-Public/Institutional Overlay STEVENS CREEK BLVD BUBB RDMCCLELLAN RD Post Office 51 Neighborhood Center CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-15 OTHER NON-RESIDENTIAL/MIXED-USE AREAS CONTEXT In addition to the Special Areas described previously, other Non-Residential/ Mixed-Use Special Areas are located throughout Cupertino. These other Non- Residential/Mixed-Use Special Areas include the following: west side of Stevens Canyon Road across from McClellan Road; intersection of Foothill Boulevard and Stevens Creek Boulevard; Homestead Road near Foothill Boulevard; northwest corner of Bollinger Road and Blaney Avenue; and all other non-residential properties not referenced in an identified commercial area. VISION Neighborhood centers within other Non-Residential/Mixed-Use Areas should be redeveloped using the “neighborhood center” concept described in the Land Use and Community Design Element. Areas not designated as “neighborhood centers” are encouraged to provide commercial uses with a traditional storefront appearance. Second-level areas may be commercial office or residential. Residential uses, if allowed per the Housing Element, should be developed in the “mixed-use village” format as described later in the Land Use and Community Design Element. Buildings are typically one to two stories in height, but may be up to three stories in some instances where it is allowed. CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-16 Cupertino has a special community character which contributes to its unique quality of life and sense of place enjoyed by people who live and work in the city. Neighborhoods play a vital role in supporting this great community’s quality of life. While Cupertino has grown and expanded over the years, neighborhoods have continued to serve as unique and identifiable areas that have great pride for local residents. In order to maintain the unique character and vitality of Cupertino’s neighborhoods, these areas must be served by needed community services such as schools, parks and neighborhood shopping. Connectivity within each neighborhood and to surrounding areas is also highly encouraged to promote social interaction and community engagement. Figure PA-2 highlights 12 identifiable neighborhoods within Cupertino. Each neighborhood is unique in its location, development pattern, identity and access to community services. Most of these areas are fully developed. However, as redevelopment opportunities arise, it is important that the policies outlined in the General Plan with respect to neighborhood preservation, connectivity, mobility and access to services are implemented. The following is a summary of the location, major characteristics, uses and vision for each of the city’s 12 neighborhoods. NEIGHBORHOODS CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-1Figure PA-2 NEIGHBORHOODS PA-17FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Oak Valley Creston- Pharlap Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman Monta Vista North Inspiration Heights North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Monta Vista South Rancho Rinconada Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Oak Valley Creston-Pharlap Inspiration Heights Monta Vista North Monta Vista South Homestead Villa Garden Gate Jollyman North Blaney South Blaney Fairgrove Rancho Rinconada CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-18 The Oak Valley neighborhood is located in the northwestern corner of Cupertino in a natural hillside transition with plentiful private and public open space. The neighborhood is bounded by Interstate 280, the City of Los Altos, Foothill Boulevard, Stevens Creek Boulevard and Santa Clara County open space/ quarry uses. The Oak Valley development, located west of the railroad tracks, is predominantly defined by single-family residential homes developed in the late 1990s or early 2000s. Oak Valley is primarily accessed from Cristo Rey Drive west of Foothill Boulevard. Development has been directed away from steep slopes, view sheds, riparian corridors and areas of tree cover and architectural styles complement the natural setting. Other uses in the Oak Valley area include the PG&E Monta Vista Electrical Substation, The Forum senior living community and skilled nursing facility, Maryknoll Catholic Seminary (in Los Altos) and the Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Housing in this neighborhood includes detached single-family homes and senior independent and assisted living units. This area is served by several amenities including Santa Clara County’s Rancho San Antonio Park, Canyon Oak Park and Little Rancho Park. The areas south and east of the Union Pacific Railroad include low to medium density residential development, mostly in the form of clustered residential, and development designed with residential hillside standards to ensure that the impacts are limited. The neighborhood has access to limited services within walking distance including a small neighborhood center at the intersection of Stevens Creek and Foothill Boulevards. VISION The Oak Valley neighborhood will continue to be primarily a detached, single- family residential area. The area is fully developed, but there may be limited growth at The Forum and Gate of Heaven sites. No other land use changes are anticipated in this area. Development intensity in the detached single-family residential portion is governed by a development agreement that includes a use permit and other approvals. These approvals describe development areas, intensity and styles of development, public park dedication, tree protection, access and historic preservation. The theme of the approvals is to balance development with environmental protection by clustering development, setting it back from sensitive OAK VALLEY CONTEXT CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-19 environmental areas and preserving large areas in permanent open space. Neighborhood connections and safe routes to Stevens Creek Elementary school on the east side of Foothill Boulevard will be enhanced with bike and pedestrian- friendly improvements along Foothill Boulevard and its key intersections. Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND STEVENS CREEK BLVD N FOOTHILL BLVD51 Gate of Heaven Cemetery Whispering Creek Equestrian Center n e n t e C r e e k Perm a OAK VALLEY NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-20 The Creston-Pharlap neighborhood is a single-family residential area that includes the last remaining unincorporated pocket within the Cupertino urban service area. The Creston portion was subdivided in the mid 1950s but has remained unincorporated. The surrounding Pharlap portion was generally subdivided between the mid 1950s to mid/late 1960s. This neighborhood is developed with single-family homes, including the Creston area which has been pre-zoned with a single-family designation. The Creston-Pharlap neighborhood is served by Stevens Creek Elementary School, Varian Park and Somerset Park. Also included in this neighborhood is the Sunny View Retirement Community, which is a residential care facility for the elderly that provides skilled nursing and independent living. Stevens Creek meanders through the neighborhood in a general north-south direction. This neighborhood is separated from the Oak Valley neighborhood by Foothill Boulevard. The Homestead Crossings neighborhood center and the neighborhood center at the corner of Stevens Creek Boulevard and Foothill Boulevard are located a short distance away and provide neighborhood serving uses. VISION The Creston-Pharlap area is largely developed and is anticipated to maintain its single-family character. The Creston portion will ultimately be annexed into the City of Cupertino with a single-family zoning designation to reflect the existing uses, consistent with the surrounding Pharlap portion. Potential trail connections within the Creston-Pharlap neighborhood may be considered to create trail linkages with the existing and planned trail system in the area. While this neighborhood does not include services within its boundary, the neighborhood commercial center at the intersection of Foothill and Stevens Creek Boulevards is within walking and biking distance to the southern part of the neighborhood. Bike and pedestrian-friendly improvements along Foothill Boulevard and its intersections will help enhance connections from the neighborhood to services on the west side. CRESTON-PHARLAP CONTEXT CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-21 280 8551 51Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM STEVENS CREEKResidential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBMN. FOOTHILL BLVD.S T E V E N S C R E E K B LVD. Stevens Creek Elementary Varian Park Somerset Park CRESTON-PHARLAP NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-22 The Inspiration Heights neighborhood is situated in the western foothills of Cupertino and offers uninterrupted vistas of the San Francisco Peninsula. The neighborhood is largely comprised of the undeveloped foothills along Cupertino’s western and southern edge and extends north to Stevens Creek Boulevard and east to Foothill Boulevard/Stevens Canyon Road. Larger lot residential hillside homes are nestled along the foothills and accessed primarily via private drives. The Inspiration Heights foothills portion can be characterized as an environmentally sensitive area given the topography, vegetation, urban wildlife interface and proximity to two inferred earthquake faults. The lower elevation portions are more urbanized and consist of smaller lot and duplex developments closer to Stevens Creek and Foothill Boulevards, which provide a transition with the adjoining neighborhoods on the valley floor. Stevens Creek County Park and the Fremont Older space, operated by the Midpeninsula Open Space District, are located to the south and west of the neighborhood. The neighborhood is also served by Monta Vista Park, located along the west side of Foothill Boulevard, and two small neighborhood service centers (one at the intersection of Foothill Boulevard and Stevens Creek Boulevard and the other at the intersection of Stevens Canyon Road and McClellan Road). Stevens Canyon Road is also a popular bicycle route for people accessing the open space preserves through this neighborhood. VISION The Inspiration Heights neighborhood will continue to be a low-intensity and hillside residential area. The lower elevation areas are largely developed; however, there remains some limited development potential in the foothills. Cupertino’s hillsides are an irreplaceable resource that provides important habitat for wildlife, recreational opportunities for residents, and visual relief. Given the sensitive environmental conditions found in the hillsides, greater attention is needed in the review and consideration of any future development proposals within this neighborhood. Enhancing the bicycle and pedestrian environment along Foothill Boulevard and Stevens Canyon Road up to the southern edge of the city will help improve neighborhood connectivity to services as well as the environment for hikers and bikers who like to use the road to access open space areas to the south and west. INSPIRATION HEIGHTS CONTEXT CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-23 STEVENS CREEK BLVD FOOTHILL BLVDSTEVENS CANYON RDVOSS AVENUE Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Monta Vista Park Stevens Creek Market Neighborhood Center INSPIRATION HEIGHTS NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM STEVENS CREEK BLVD FOOTHILL BLVDSTEVENS CANYON RDVOSS AVENUE Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Monta Vista Park Stevens Creek Market Neighborhood Center CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-24 The Monta Vista North neighborhood is located in the western portion of Cupertino and is generally bounded by Stevens Creek Boulevard to the north, Regnart Creek/Road to the south, Foothill Boulevard to the west and Highway 85 to the east. This neighborhood is directly adjacent to the Monta Vista Village Special Area. The Monta Vista North neighborhood encompasses the tri-school area of Lincoln Elementary School, Kennedy Middle School and Monta Vista High School, and also includes community facilities such as Blackberry Farm, McClellan Ranch Preserve, Linda Vista Park and Stevens Creek County Park. Located directly to the south of this neighborhood in the unincorporated county is the Fremont Older Open Space Preserve, operated by the Midpeninsula Open Space District. Stevens Creek meanders through the western portion of the neighborhood through Blackberry Farm Golf Course and the privately owned and operated Deep Cliff Golf Course. Both golf courses are depressed in elevation in relation to the surrounding residential homes and are therefore subject to flooding. A number of Cupertino’s historic and commemorative sites are located in this neighborhood near Stevens Creek. A former quarry site is also located near the southwest portion of the neighborhood. Much of the neighborhood east of Stevens Creek is located along the valley floor; however, the topography in the southwestern portion of the neighborhood consists of steep slopes and hilly terrain. VISION The Monta Vista North neighborhood is largely built out with the exception of the former McDonald-Dorsa quarry site and an adjacent 42-acre property currently under the same ownership. A portion of this undeveloped land may be considered for limited future low-density residential development, which could include trails that would connect the City’s recreational facilities (McClellan Ranch Preserve and Linda Vista Park) to Stevens Creek County Park and the Fremont Older Open Space Preserve. MONTA VISTA NORTH CONTEXT CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-25 MCCLELLAN RD.BUBB RD.S. FOOTHILL BLVD. CANYON RDSTEVENS STEVEN S C R E E K B L V D 85 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Monta Vista High School Lincoln Elementary John F Kennedy Middle School Former Quarry Linda Vista Park Deep Cliff Golf Course Stevens Creek51 Neighborhood Center MCCLELLAN RD.BUBB RD.S. FOOTHILL BLVD. CANYON RDSTEVENS STE VE N S C R E E K B L V D 85 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Monta Vista High School Lincoln Elementary John F Kennedy Middle School Former Quarry Linda Vista Park Deep Cliff Golf Course Stevens Creek51 Neighborhood Center MONTA VISTA NORTH NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-26 The Monta Vista South neighborhood is located along the southern edge of Cupertino and is bounded by Regnart Road/Creek to the north, the City of Saratoga to the south across Prospect Road, the unincorporated County to the south and west, and Highway 85 and the City of San Jose to the east. The neighborhood can be divided into two general areas with very distinct characteristics. The west side of the Monta Vista South neighborhood is located in the southwestern foothills and zoned for residential hillside development. Lots in this area are primarily over one acre in size, and in some instances up to 13 acres. The east side of the Monta Vista South neighborhood is located on the valley floor and is developed in a more traditional residential subdivision pattern with lots generally 6,000 square feet in size. Regnart Elementary School, Three Oaks Park and Hoover Park are located in the eastern portion of the Monta Vista South neighborhood. Also located at the southern edge of this neighborhood is the 37-acre Seven Springs Ranch that was listed on the California Register of Historic Places and determined eligible for the National Register in 2011. VISION The Monta Vista South neighborhood is envisioned to remain a residential area. There remains some limited subdivision potential within the residential hillsides, which would be subject to the City’s hillside policies and standards. In the eastern portion of the neighborhood, no change is anticipated with the exception of the Seven Springs area at the south edge of Cupertino that may have potential for limited development. Given the historic designation of the Seven Springs Ranch property, any future development would be subject to compliance with the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Historic Resources. MONTA VISTA SOUTH CONTEXT CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-27 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 85 RAINBOW DR S. STELLING RDBUBB RDPROSPECT RD Regnart Elementary Three OaksPark Hoover Park MONTA VISTA SOUTH NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 85 RAINBOW DR S. STELLING RDBUBB RDPROSPECT RD Regnart Elementary Three Oaks Park Hoover Park CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-28 The Homestead Villa neighborhood is located at the northern edge of Cupertino at the northwest quadrant of Interstate 280 and Highway 85. The City of Los Altos is located to the west and north of this neighborhood, across Homestead Road. Housing within this neighborhood includes a mixture of traditional single- family homes, clustered homesites, townhomes, condominiums and duplexes. The area does not contain any public parks or schools; however, there is a private school located near the northeast corner of the neighborhood. The neighborhood is served by West Valley Elementary School and Cupertino Middle School across Homestead Road to the north, and Homestead High School to the east. The neighborhood is also served by the Homestead Crossing neighborhood center which currently includes coffee shops, a sandwich shop, personal service uses and a bank. Also located directly adjacent on the west, within the City of Los Altos, is a neighborhood shopping center that currently includes a pharmacy and specialty grocery store. VISION The Homestead Villa neighborhood is largely developed and is not anticipated to change in character. A trail along Foothill Boulevard is identified in the General Plan as a proposed trail linkage that will connect to Stevens Creek in Mountain View and points north. Bicycle and pedestrian improvements along Homestead Road will help the neighborhood connect to schools and services. HOMESTEAD VILLA CONTEXT HOMESTEAD VILLA NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM 280 85 51 101182 HOMESTEAD RD F O O T H I L L EXPYSTEVE N S CREEK Homestead Crossing Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Neighborhood Center 280 85 51 101182 HOMESTEAD RD F O O TH I L L EXPYSTEVE N S CREEK Homestead Crossing Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Neighborhood Center CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-29 The Garden Gate neighborhood is located in the central portion of Cupertino and is predominantly defined by single-family residential homes with pockets of duplexes and apartments, including the Villages of Cupertino apartment site. Bounded by Interstate 280, Mary Avenue, the Heart of the City Special Area and the North De Anza Special Area, this area is served by several amenities including shopping and employment opportunities along Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevards, Garden Gate Elementary, Mary Avenue Dog Park, Memorial Park and the Quinlan Community Center. A substantial portion of the neighborhood was originally developed in the early 1950s and was in unincorporated Santa Clara County until it was annexed to Cupertino in 2001. The remaining neighborhood near Mary Avenue was developed in the late 1960s. There has been substantial redevelopment of existing homes in the neighborhood since the 1990s with varying architectural styles and building sizes. Lot sizes are generally larger than other single-family residential neighborhoods in other parts of the city. VISION The Garden Gate neighborhood will continue to be mainly a residential area. Existing single-family residences will continue to develop in accordance with the R1 Ordinance, and there may be redevelopment of some existing apartment and duplex uses. No other land use changes are anticipated in this area. Bicycle and pedestrian-friendly improvements to Stelling Road will help strengthen connections to Quinlan Center and Memorial Park. GARDEN GATE CONTEXT CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-30 25 51 101 53 182280 85 STELLING RDResidential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Garden Gate Elementary YMCA Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM GARDEN GATE NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-31 The Jollyman neighborhood is located in the central portion of Cupertino, south of Stevens Creek Boulevard. This area is predominantly defined by single-family residential homes and is generally located on the valley floor with minimal changes in grade. Bounded by Highway 85, Stevens Creek Boulevard and De Anza Boulevard, this area is served by several amenities including a large park and several churches along Stelling Road. McClellan Road is a major east-west corridor through the area. The McClellan Square Shopping Center, located in the South De Anza Special Area, includes grocery stores, pharmaceutical services and a variety of small restaurants and neighborhood serving uses. Housing types located in this neighborhood include fourplexes, townhomes and apartments. Jollyman Park and Faria Elementary School are also located in the Jollyman Neighborhood. VISION The Jollyman neighborhood will continue to be a residential area. It is anticipated that there may be limited residential growth in this area on sites that may be subdivided. No other changes are anticipated in this area. McClellan Road is a key school route and is envisioned to become a bicycle and pedestrian route to improve the east-west connection to connect neighborhoods to the east and west to the tri-school area. JOLLYMAN CONTEXT JOLLYMAN NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM 85 MCLELLAN RD STELLING RDWilliam Faria Elementary Jollyman Park Regnart Creek 53 5525 323 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 LEGEND 85 MCLELLAN RD STELLING RDWilliam Faria Elementary Jollyman Park Regnart Creek 53 5525 323 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 LEGEND CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-32 NORTH BLANEY CONTEXT The North Blaney neighborhood is located in the eastern portion of Cupertino, north of Stevens Creek Boulevard and east of De Anza Boulevard. This area, predominantly defined by single-family residential homes, is on the valley floor with minimal grade changes. Bounded generally by De Anza Boulevard, Highway 280, Stevens Creek Boulevard, and Perimeter Road, this area is served by amenities including Portal Park, which includes a number of recreational amenities such as a tot lot and a recreation building. The Junipero Serra drainage channel runs along the northern edge of the neighborhood along Interstate 280. North Blaney is a major north-south corridor through the area. The Portal Plaza Shopping Center, located in the Heart of the City Special Area, includes grocery facilities and a variety of neighborhood serving uses. Proximity to the Vallco Shopping Mall in the Heart of the City Special Area provides opportunities for shopping for this neighborhood within close walking distance. Housing types located in this neighborhood include duplexes, townhomes and apartments closer to the freeway. The North Blaney Neighborhood includes Collins Elementary School and Lawson Middle School. VISION The North Blaney neighborhood will continue to be mainly a residential area. It is anticipated that there may be limited residential growth in this area on sites that may be subdivided or redeveloped. No other land use changes are anticipated in this area. Bicycle and pedestrian enhancements to North Blaney Avenue will improve the north-south connection through the city. There is also a potential to improve the east-west pedestrian and bicycle connection along the Junipero Serra channel along Interstate 280. NORTH BLANEY NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 51 101 182 CollinsElementary Portal Park Lawson Middle School DE ANZA BLVDBLANEY AVE280 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 51 101 182 Collins Elementary Portal Park Lawson Middle School DE ANZA BLVDBLANEY AVE280 CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-33 The South Blaney neighborhood is located in the eastern portion of Cupertino, south of Stevens Creek Boulevard and east of De Anza Boulevard. This area is predominantly defined by single-family residential homes on the valley floor with minimal changes in grade. Bounded generally by Bollinger Road, Miller Road, De Anza Boulevard and Stevens Creek Boulevard, this area is served by several amenities including proximity to the Cupertino Library and two large parks: Wilson Park and Creekside Park. South Blaney Avenue is a major north-south corridor through the area. Two creeks run through this neighborhood. Regnart Creek has mainly a concrete channel and Calabazas Creek has a more natural channel. The De Anza Plaza Shopping Center, located in the South De Anza Special Area, includes a variety of small restaurants and neighborhood serving uses. Housing types located in this neighborhood include townhomes and duplexes that line Miller Avenue and Bollinger Road. Eaton Elementary School is also located in the South Blaney Neighborhood. VISION The South Blaney neighborhood will continue to be a residential area. It is anticipated that there may be limited residential growth in this area on sites that may be subdivided or redeveloped with multi-family uses. No other changes are anticipated in this area. Enhancements to De Anza Boulevard, Blaney Avenue and Bollinger Road with a bicycle and pedestrian route will improve the north-south and east-west connections in this neighborhood. SOUTH BLANEY CONTEXT SOUTH BLANEY NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 25 26BLANEY AVE MILLER AVE BOLLINGER RD Wilson Park Eaton Elementary Creekside Park CreekCalaba z a s Neighborhood Center Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Commercial/Residential $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM LEGEND 25 26BLANEY AVE MILLER AVE BOLLINGER RD Wilson Park Eaton Elementary Creekside Park CreekCalaba z a s Neighborhood Center CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-34 RANCHO RINCONADA CONTEXT The Rancho Rinconada neighborhood is located in the southeastern portion of Cupertino, bounded by Stevens Creek Boulevard, Tantau Avenue, Lawrence Expressway, Bollinger Road and the Fairgrove Neighborhood. This area is predominantly defined by single-family residential homes with some duplexes and apartments. The area is served by several amenities including shopping and employment opportunities along Stevens Creek Boulevard, Sterling Barnhart Park, Sedgwick Elementary School, Cupertino High School, Lutheran Church of Our Saviour, Bethel Lutheran Church and Saratoga Creek. The neighborhood was originally developed in the late 1940s/early 1950s and the majority of the neighborhood was in unincorporated Santa Clara County until it was annexed to Cupertino in 1999. There has been substantial redevelopment of existing homes in the neighborhood since the 1990s with varying architectural styles and building sizes. Lot sizes are generally smaller than other single- family residential neighborhoods in the city. This area is served by the newly constructed Sterling Barnhart Park at the eastern end of the neighborhood. In addition, the Rancho Rinconada Park and Recreation District operates a swim and recreation center at the southern end of the neighborhood, which are available to the residents of the Rancho Rinconada area. Neighborhood centers serving the area are along Stevens Creek Boulevard and Tantau Avenue to the north. VISION The Rancho Rinconada neighborhood will continue to be mainly a residential area. Existing single-family residences will continue to redevelop in accordance with the R1 Ordinance, and there may be redevelopment of some existing apartment and duplex uses. No other major land use changes are anticipated in this area. This area has the potential for a future park along the Saratoga/San Tomas Creek Trail west of Lawrence Expressway. CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-35TANTAU AVEBOLLINGER RD BARNHARDT AVE Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 pre-zoned, outside of city limits Cupertino High School Sedgwick Elementary Bethel LutheranSchoolCalabazas CreekMILLER AVE 25 26 RANCHO RINCONADA NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AREAS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PA-36 FAIRGROVE CONTEXT The Fairgrove neighborhood is located in the southeastern portion of Cupertino and includes the area bounded by Phil Lane to the north, Tantau Avenue to the east, Bollinger to the south, and Miller Avenue to the west. The neighborhood is zoned “R1e-Eichler Single Family” and consists of a group of distinct 220 Eichler homes built in the early 1960s. Hyde Middle School is located within the Fairgrove neighborhood. VISION The Fairgrove neighborhood will continue to be mainly a low density single- family residential area. The City will continue to encourage application of the Eichler Design Handbook Guidelines in the Fairgrove neighborhood to preserve the neighborhood’s unique character and architectural identity. 26 25MILLER AVETANTAU AVEBOLLINGER RD Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 LEGEND Residential Land Use Designations Very Low Density (1/2 Acre Slope Density Formula) Very Low Density (Slope Density Formula) Low Density (1-5 DU/Acre) Low Density (1-6 DU/Acre) Rancho Rinconada Low/Medium Density (5-10 DU/Acre) Medium Density (10-20 DU/Acre) Medium/High Density (20-35 DU/Acre) Very Low Density (5-20 Acre Slope Density Formula) High Density (>35 DU/Acre) Non-Residential Land Use Designations Commercial/Residential 0ˎDF*OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM Public Facilities Quasi-Public $PNNFSDJBM0ˎDF3FTJEFOUJBM Parks and Open Space 2VBTJ1VCMJD*OTUJUVUJPOBM Riparian Corridor Creek Transit Route Monta Vista Land Use Designations Residential (4.4-7.7 DU/Acre) Residential (4.4-12 DU/Acre) Residential (10-15 DU/Acre) Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Residential (0-4.4 DU/Acre) 26 0B3EF9 Hyde Middle School FAIRGROVE NEIGHBORHOOD DIAGRAM land use and community design CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY CHARACTER ELEMENT | cupertino community vision 2040 2 The Land Use and Community Design Element is the keystone of Community Vision 2040. It unifies and informs the other Elements by providing an overall policy context for future physical change. It deals with the issues of future growth and helps define the desired balance among social, environmental and economic considerations, while enhancing quality of life in the community. As Cupertino implements Community Vision 2040, it aspires to preserve and enhance the distinct character of each planning area to create a vibrant community with inviting streets and public spaces, preserved, connected and walkable neighborhoods, exceptional parks and community services, and a vibrant economy with a strong tax base. This Element includes goals, policies and strategies that provide direction on land use and design principles that will shape future change in Cupertino. In turn, each of the other Elements in Community Vision 2040 support the land use and design assumptions included in this Element. Introduction LU-2 Introduction LU-3 Context Development History Land Use and Transportation Patterns Historic Preservation Hillsides Neighborhood Preservation Regional Land Use Planning Cupertino’s Demographics Climate Action Plan and Sustainable Development Principles Economic Vitality LU-8 Looking Forward LU-10 Citywide Goals and Policies Balanced Community Community Identity Site and Building Design Streetscape Design Connectivity Historic Preservation Arts and Culture Fiscal Stability Economic Development Regional Cooperation and Coordination Access to Community Facilities and Services Hillsides LU-40 Planning Area Goals and Policies Special Areas Heart of the City Special Area West Stevens Creek Boulevard Subarea Crossroads Subarea City Center Subarea Central Stevens Creek Boulevard Subarea East Stevens Creek Boulevard Subarea Vallco Shopping District Special Area North Vallco Park Special Area North De Anza Special Area South De Anza Special Area Homestead Special Area Bubb Road Special Area Monta Vista Village Other Non-Residential/ Mixed-Use Special Areas Neighborhoods Inspiration Heights Neighborhood Oak Valley Neighborhood Fairgrove Neighborhood CONTENTS: CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) DEVELOPMENT HISTORY Cupertino was incorporated in 1955 and grew from a lightly settled agricultural community of 2,500 people into a mostly suburban community during Silicon Valley’s expansion from the 1960s through the 1980s. Cupertino’s attractive natural setting and close proximity to employment centers and regional transportation networks makes it a highly desirable place to live. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION PATTERNS Cupertino’s land use pattern was largely built on a conventional suburban model, with predominantly single-family residential subdivisions and distinct commercial and employment centers. This development pattern was also heavily influenced by the topography of the area, with more intensive growth located on the valley floor and lower design residential on the foothills. The western area by the foothills is semi-rural with steep terrain, larger residential lots and access to open space. The pattern becomes more suburban immediately west of Highway 85 where residential neighborhoods have a more uniform pattern with smaller lots and older commercial and industrial areas along Stevens Creek Boulevard and Bubb Road. The land use pattern becomes more urban east of Highway 85, with a relatively connected street grid and commercial development along major boulevards such as Stevens Creek, De Anza, Homestead, Stelling and Wolfe. This area also has significant amounts of multi-family development in and around the major boulevards. The suburban pattern is also reflected in building locations, with most of the older buildings set back from the street with parking lots in the front. Streets have also been historically widened to accommodate larger volumes of traffic, often to the detriment of other forms of transportation such as walking, biking and transit. In the last 20 years, the City has made strides towards improving walkability and bikeability by retrofitting existing streets to include bike lanes; creating sidewalks lined with trees along major boulevards; and encouraging development to provide a more pedestrian-oriented frontage with active uses, gathering places and entries lining the street. As the City seeks to implement sustainability and community health objectives, future growth and retrofitting of existing infrastructure will create vibrant mixed- use, commercial, employment and neighborhood centers; pedestrian-oriented and walkable spaces for the community to gather; and distinct and connected neighborhoods with easy walkable and bikeable access to services, including schools, parks and shopping. LU-3 CONTEXT CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HISTORIC PRESERVATION The Cupertino area was originally settled by the Ohlone Indians, who lived in the Rancho San Antonio area for over 3,000 years. In 1776 the area was explored by Spanish soldiers during an expedition led by Colonel Juan Bautista De Anza. The area was later settled by European immigrants who established farms on the valley’s fertile land and enjoyed a thriving agricultural economy. In the late nineteenth century, the village of Cupertino sprang up at the crossroads of Saratoga-Sunnyvale Road (De Anza Boulevard) and Stevens Creek Road. It was first known as the West Side. However, by 1898 the post office at the Crossroads needed a new name to distinguish it from other similarly named towns. The name “Cupertino” came from a local creek and winery owned by John T. Doyle, a San Francisco lawyer and historian. In 1904, the Cupertino name was officially applied to the Crossroads post office. At the same time, the Home Union Store at the Crossroads location was renamed the Cupertino Store and moved to the northeast corner of the Crossroads. HILLSIDES Cupertino’s hillsides are an irreplaceable resource shared by the entire Santa Clara Valley. They provide important habitat for plants and wildlife; watershed capacity to prevent flooding in downstream areas; a wide vegetative belt that cleanses the air of pollutants; creates recreational opportunities for residents; and a natural environment that provides a contrast to the built environment. The City balances the needs of property owners in hillside areas with those of the environment and the community by allowing low-intensity residential and other uses in these areas, while requiring preservation of natural habitat and riparian corridors when selecting building sites. NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION Cupertino is a city with diverse and unique neighborhoods that vary in character and composition. As Cupertino matures, the city must continue to look at preserving and enhancing its built environment. Cupertino’s vision is to preserve the distinct character of neighborhoods; provide walking and biking connections to services including parks, schools and shopping; and revitalize neighborhood centers as community gathering places. The City will welcome citizens as partners in making sure that their neighborhoods are the kind in which they want to live in the future. LU-4 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-5 REGIONAL LAND USE PLANNING The Sustainable Communities and Climate Protection Act of 2008 (SB 375) calls on each of the State’s 18 metropolitan areas to develop a Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) to accommodate future population growth and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light trucks. Plan Bay Area, jointly adopted in 2013 by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), is the region’s first Sustainable Communities Strategy to meet the requirements of SB 375 through the year 2040. Plan Bay Area anticipates that the Bay Area’s population will grow from about 7 million today to approximately 9 million by 2040 with employment growth of about 1.1 million jobs. The Plan provides a strategy for meeting 80 percent of the region’s future housing needs in Priority Development Areas (PDAs). These are neighborhoods within walking distance of frequent transit service, offering a wide variety of housing options, and featuring amenities such as grocery stores, community centers and restaurants (see page LU-7). CUPERTINO’S DEMOGRAPHICS Cupertino’s population has grown from 3,664 in 1960 to over 58,000 in 2010 per the U.S. Census Bureau. Most of the population growth has been from annexation of areas into the city and from tract development during the 1970s and 1980s. The city’s population is projected to grow to 66,110 by 2040 (Plan Bay Area, 2013). The diversity of its population has grown and changed over the years. In 1960, 94 percent of the population was white while only 6 percent of the population comprised of other races per the U.S. Census. This statistic held fairly steady until 1980 when the population of whites steadily started to decline with only 91 percent being white. By 1990, the population of whites had plunged to 74 percent and the Asian population had increased to 23 percent. In the following decade, the white population continued to decline steadily to 50 percent, while Asian population stood at 44 percent. By 2010 the Asian population in Cupertino accounted for almost two thirds of the population (63 percent). A sizeable portion of the City’s 2010 population, almost 50 percent are foreign born while only seven percent of the 1960 population was foreign born; indicating a large immigrant population. The population of Cupertino is also growing older. Per the 1970 census, the median age in the city was 26. The 2010 census reveals that the median age in Cupertino has increased to 39.9. In 1970, only three percent of the population was 65 years or over in age; however, the 2010 census indicates that 12.5 percent of the population is 65 years or over. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) With the changing demographic and ethnic values, housing needs are changing as more immigrant families care for parents in their homes, younger workers look for more affordable housing, close to services and employment, and the older generation looks to downsize from their single-family homes into smaller, single-level homes within walking distance to shopping and entertainment. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES A major challenge today is meeting the energy needs of a growing population while protecting the environment and natural resources. The Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) and Executive Order S-3-05 set a target to reduce California’s greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by year 2020 and by 80 percent below the 1990 levels by year 2050. The City is in the process of completing its Climate Action Plan (CAP), which aims to achieve statewide and Bay Area emissions reduction targets. The CAP is based on 2040 growth projections for Cupertino and identifies policies and strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at a municipal and community-wide level. Similar to most neighboring cities, Cupertino has historically had an imbalance of land uses (housing, services and jobs) with a roadway infrastructure primarily dedicated to the automobile. When this imbalance is multiplied at a regional level, there are regional consequences including, traffic congestion, high housing costs, increased air pollution and lack of accessibility for the young, elderly and disabled. ECONOMIC VITALITY Cupertino is fortunate in its location in the heart of Silicon Valley. Despite its mostly suburban characteristics to the west and south, the city is home to a number of small, medium and large software, technology and biomedical companies. Community Vision 2040 includes more office growth to support a strong fiscal revenue and a stable tax base. In particular, policies focus on retaining and increasing the number of small, medium and major businesses in key sectors and provide flexible space for innovative startups that need non- traditional office environment. Policies for commercial areas seek to revitalize the Vallco Shopping District, and enhance commercial centers and neighborhood centers, which contribute to the City’s tax base and serve community needs. LU-6 In 2008, ABAG and the MTC created a regional initiative to allow local governments to identify Priority Development Areas (PDAs). PDAs are areas where new development will support the day-to-day needs of residents and workers in a pedestrian-friendly environment served by transit. While PDAs were originally established to address housing needs in infill communities, they have been broadened to advance focused employment growth. PDAs are critical components for implementing the region’s proposed long term growth strategy. The level of growth in each PDA reflects its role in achieving regional objectives and how it fits into locally designated priority growth plans. Cupertino’s PDA area includes properties within a quarter mile of Stevens Creek Boulevard from Highway 85 to its eastern border and a portion of North and South De Anza Boulevards. PRIORITY DEVELOPMENT AREAS Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas PDA Boundary CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-8 PLANNING FOR CHANGING DEMOGRAPHICS. The City needs to plan not only for existing families which form a larger percentage of our population, but also for the growing demographic of seniors and younger workers through new housing, services, shopping, entertainment and community facilities. LOCAL AND REGIONAL LAND USE PLANNING AND COLLABORATION. The City will take an active part in regional collaborative planning processes related to housing, transportation, sustainability, health, transportation and infrastructure financing in order to ensure local land use and transportation decisions are coordinated with regional efforts. INTEGRATING COMMUNITY HEALTH INTO LAND USE PLANNING. Integrating community health into land use planning. The City will enhance and improve health of people who live and work in our community. This includes integrating land use and transportation networks to reduce reliance on auto usage and improving alternative choices for transportation by focusing growth and change in corridors that support all modes of transit, providing neighborhoods with easy access to schools, parks and neighborhood centers. Maintaining and enhancing Cupertino’s great quality of life is the keystone of Community Vision 2040. The City will look towards focusing future change within Special Areas that are located on Cupertino’s major mixed-use corridors. These areas already have a mix of commercial, office, hotel and residential uses, and are located along roadways that will be enhanced with “Complete Streets” features (see Mobility Element), improved landscaping and expanded public spaces (e.g., parks and plazas). In turn, the City will also protect and enhance Neighborhoods throughout Cupertino to ensure these largely residential areas continue to support the community’s great quality of life. As we look forward, the following are ways the City will address key challenges and opportunities facing Cupertino: LOOKING FORWARD 1 2 3 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-9 LAND USE AND ECONOMICS. The City will look to diversify the City’s tax base, support and retain existing businesses, increase the vitality of aging commercial centers with redevelopment, seek to diversify shopping opportunities so that the community has the opportunity to satisfy their shopping needs within Cupertino. URBAN DESIGN, FORM AND CHARACTER. The City will seek high-quality development to achieve desired physical environment in Planning Areas, including walkable, connected neighborhoods, inviting streets that allow for different modes of transportation, and vibrant and walkable special areas, and neighborhood centers in keeping with Community Vision 2040. PRESERVATION OF NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AND HILLSIDES. Cupertino is blessed with an abundance of natural resources, including hillsides, creek corridors, and sensitive animal and plant habitats along the foothills. Much of this land is preserved in low-intensity residential and agricultural uses or open space. As redevelopment occurs, the City will strive to preserve these natural areas through land use and building design decisions. ECONOMIC VITALITY AND FISCAL STABILITY. As Cupertino’s population grows and ages, demands on community resources will increase. In order to maintain and enhance the community’s quality of life, the City will ensure that existing businesses are encouraged to reinvest and grow in Cupertino, and that the city continues to attract new businesses and investment. 4 5 6 7 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) CITYWIDE GOALS AND POLICIES LU-10 Cupertino is a collection of many different neighborhoods, employment centers, streets, parks and open space areas that all have their own unique character and constraints. While there are specific planning and design considerations for these areas (see Planning Area Goals and Policies later in this Element), many growth, design and planning policies and strategies apply citywide. The following section describes the goals, policies and strategies that are applicable to all property in the city. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) BALANCED COMMUNITY The City seeks to balance future growth and development in order create a more complete community. This includes ensuring a mix of land uses that support economic, social and cultural goals in order to preserve and enhance Cupertino’s great quality of life. POLICY LU-1.1: LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION Focus higher land use intensities and densities within a half-mile of public transit service, and along major corridors. POLICY LU-1.2: DEVELOPMENT ALLOCATION Maintain and update the development allocation table (Table LU-1) to ensure that the allocations for various land uses adequately meet city goals. STRATEGIES: LU-1.2.1: Planning Area Allocations. Development allocations are assigned for various Planning Areas. However, some flexibility may be allowed for transferring allocations among Planning Areas provided no significant environmental impacts are identified beyond those already studied in the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for Community Vision 2040. LU-1.2.2: Major Employers. Reserve a development allocation for major companies with sales office and corporate headquarters in Cupertino. Prioritize expansion of office space for existing major companies. New office development must demonstrate that the development positively contributes to the fiscal well-being of the city. GOAL LU-1 Create a balanced community with a mix of land uses that supports thriving businesses, all modes of transportation, complete neighborhoods and a healthy community LU-11 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-1.2.3: Unused Development Allocation. Unused development allocations may be re-assigned to the citywide allocation table per Planning Area, when development agreements and development permits expire. LU-1.2.4: Neighborhood Allocation. Allocate residential units in neighborhoods through the building permit process unless subdivision or development applications are required. POLICY LU-1.3: LAND USE IN ALL CITYWIDE MIXED-USE DISTRICTS Encourage land uses that support the activity and character of mixed-use districts and economic goals. STRATEGIES: LU-1.3.1: Commercial and Residential Uses. Review the placement of commercial and residential uses based on the following criteria: 1. All mixed-use areas with commercial zoning will require retail as a substantial component. The North De Anza Special Area is an exception. 2. All mixed-use residential projects should be designed on the “mixed- use village” concept discussed earlier in this Element. 3. On sites with a mixed-use residential designation, residential is a permitted use only on Housing Element sites and in the Monta Vista Village Special Area. 4. Conditional use permits will be required on mixed-use Housing Element sites that propose units above the allocation in the Housing Element, and on non-Housing Element mixed-use sites. LU-1.3.2: Public and Quasi-Public Uses. Review the placement of public and quasi-public activities in limited areas in mixed-use commercial and office zones when the following criteria are met: 1. The proposed use is generally in keeping with the goals for the Planning Area, has similar patterns of traffic, population or circulation of uses with the area and does not disrupt the operations of existing uses. 2. The building form is similar to buildings in the area (commercial or office forms). In commercial areas, the building should maintain a commercial interface by providing retail activity, storefront appearance or other design considerations in keeping with the goals of the Planning Area. LU-12 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-1.4: PARCEL ASSEMBLY Encourage parcel assembly and discourage parcelization to ensure that infill development meets City standards and provides adequate buffers to neighborhoods. POLICY LU-1.5: COMMUNITY HEALTH THROUGH LAND USE Promote community health through land use and design. POLICY LU-1.6: JOBS/HOUSING BALANCE Strive for a more balanced ratio of jobs and housing units. Table LU-1: Citywide Development Allocation Between 2014-2040 commercial (s.f.)office (s.f.)hotel (rooms)residential (units) current built (Oct 7,2014) buildout available current built (Oct 7,2014) buildout available current built (Oct 7,2014) buildout available current built (Oct 7,2014) buildout available Heart of the City 1,351,730 214,5000 793,270 2,447,500 2,464,613 17,113 404 526 122 1,336 1,805 469 Vallco Shopping District** 1,207,774 120,7774 --2,000,000 2,000,000 148 339 191 -389 389 Homestead 291,408 291,408 -69,550 69,550 -126 126 -600 750 150 N. De Anza 56,708 56,708 -2,081,021 2,081,021 -126 126 -49 146 97 N. Vallco 133,147 133,147 -3,069,676 3,069,676 -123 123 -554 1154 600 S. De Anza 352,283 352,283 -130,708 130,708 -315 315 -6 6 - Bubb ---444,753 444,753 ------- Monta Vista Village 94,051 99,698 5,647 443,140 456,735 13,595 ---828 878 50 Other 144,964 144964,-119,896 119,896 ----18,039 18,166 127 Major Employers ---109,935 633,053 523,118 ------ Citywide 3,632,065 4,430,982 798,917 8,916,179 11,470,005 2,553826,1116 1429 313 21,412 23,294 1,882 ** Buildout totals for Office and Residential allocation within the Vallco Shopping District are contingent upon a Specific Plan being adopted for this area by May 31, 2018. If a Specific Plan is not adopted by that date, City will consider the removal of the Office and Residential allocations for Vallco Shopping District. See the Housing Element (Chapter 4) for additional information and requirements within the Vallco Shopping District. LU-13 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-2 Ensure that buildings, sidewalks, streets and public spaces are coordinated to enhance community identity and character COMMUNITY IDENTITY The City will seek to promote community identity and design consistency through the development review process and infrastructure master plans. POLICY LU-2.1: GATEWAYS Implement a gateway plan for the city’s entry points (Figure LU-1) and identify locations and design guidelines for gateway features. Look for opportunities to reflect the gateway concept when properties adjacent to defined gateways are redeveloped. POLICY LU-2.2: PEDESTRIAN-ORIENTED PUBLIC SPACES Require developments to incorporate pedestrian-scaled elements along the street and within the development such as parks, plazas, active uses along the street, active uses, entries, outdoor dining and public art.FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDP RUNERIDGE AVE STEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 00.5 1Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) N Gateway LU-14 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-1 FIGURE LU-1 GATEWAYS FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDP RUNERIDGE AVE STEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 00.5 1Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) N Gateway LU-15 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Hill s i d e Tra n s i t i o n 280 280 280 85 85 SARATOGA SUNNYVALE SANTA CLARA STEVENS CREEK BLVDWOLFE RD DE ANZA BLVDDE ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD RD Homestead Special Area Maximum Residential Density As indicated in the General Plan Land Use Map; 15 units per acre for Neighborhood Commercial Sites Maximum Height 30 feet Homestead Special Area North Vallco Park Special Area Maximum Residential Density Up to 35 units per acre per General Plan Land Use Map 15 units per acre (southeast corner of Homestead Road and Blaney Avenue) Maximum Height 30 feet, or 45 feet (south side between De Anza and Stelling) Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 60 feet Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet Maximum Residential Density 25 (north of Bollinger) or 5-15 (south of 85) units per acre Maximum Height 30 feet Monta Vista Village Special Area Maximum Residential Density 20 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet West of Wolfe Rd Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height Per Specific Plan East of Wolfe Rd Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height Per Specific Plan Maximum Residential Density 25 or 35 (South Vallco) units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet, or 30 feet where designated by hatched line Maximum Residential Density Up to 15 units per acre per General Plan Land Use Map Maximum Height Up to 30 feet Heart of the City Special Area North De Anza Special Area South De Anza Special Area Monta Vista Village Special Area Bubb Road Special Area Vallco Shopping District Special Area Neighborhoods North De Anza Gateway Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet Stelling Gateway West of Stelling Road: Maximum Residential Density 15 units per acre (southwest corner of Homestead and Stelling Roads) 35 units per acre (northwest corner of I-280 and Stelling Road) Maximum Height 30 feet East of Stelling Road: Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet Oaks Gateway Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet North Crossroads Node Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet South Vallco Park Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet, or 60 feet with retail North Vallco Gateway West of Wolfe Road: Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 60 feet East of Wolfe Road: Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 75 feet (buildings located within 50 feet of the property lines abutting Wolfe Road, Pruneridge Avenue and Apple Campus 2 site shall not exceed 60 feet) City Center Node Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet or as existing, for existing buildings Building Planes: • Maintain the primary building bulk below a 1:1 slope line drawn from the arterial/boulevard curb line or lines except for the Crossroads Area. • For the Crossroads area, see the Crossroads Streetscape Plan. • For projects adjacent to residential areas: Heights and setbacks adjacent to residential areas will be determined during project review. • For the North and South Vallco Park areas (except for the Vallco Shopping District Special Area): Maintain the primary building bulk below a 1.5:1 (i.e., 1.5 feet of setback for every 1 foot of building height) slope line drawn from the Stevens Creek Blvd. and Homestead Road curb lines and below 1:1 slope line drawn from Wolfe Road and Tantau Avenue curb line. Rooftop Mechanical Equipment: Rooftop mechanical equipment and utility structures may exceed stipulated height limitations if they are enclosed, centrally located on the roof and not visible from adjacent streets. Priority Housing Sites: Notwithstanding the heights and densities shown above, the maximum heights and densities for Priority Housing Sites identified in the adopted Housing Element shall be as reflected in the Housing Element. Legend City Boundary Special Areas Homestead North Vallco Park Vallco Shopping District North De Anza South De Anza Bubb Road Monta Vista Village Avenues (Major Collectors) Boulevards (Arterials) Key Intersections Neighborhood Centers Heart of the City Hillside Transition Urban Service Area Sphere of Influence Urban Transition Avenues (Minor Collectors) Neighborhoods Neighborhoods Figure LU-1 COMMUNITY FORM DIAGRAM LU-16 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Hill s i d e Tra n s i t i o n 280 280 280 85 85 SARATOGA SUNNYVALE SANTA CLARA STEVENS CREEK BLVDWOLFE RD DE ANZA BLVDDE ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD RD Homestead Special Area Maximum Residential Density As indicated in the General Plan Land Use Map; 15 units per acre for Neighborhood Commercial Sites Maximum Height 30 feet Homestead Special Area North Vallco Park Special Area Maximum Residential Density Up to 35 units per acre per General Plan Land Use Map 15 units per acre (southeast corner of Homestead Road and Blaney Avenue) Maximum Height 30 feet, or 45 feet (south side between De Anza and Stelling) Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 60 feet Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet Maximum Residential Density 25 (north of Bollinger) or 5-15 (south of 85) units per acre Maximum Height 30 feet Monta Vista Village Special Area Maximum Residential Density 20 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet West of Wolfe Rd Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height Per Specific Plan East of Wolfe Rd Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height Per Specific Plan Maximum Residential Density 25 or 35 (South Vallco) units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet, or 30 feet where designated by hatched line Maximum Residential Density Up to 15 units per acre per General Plan Land Use Map Maximum Height Up to 30 feet Heart of the City Special Area North De Anza Special Area South De Anza Special Area Monta Vista Village Special Area Bubb Road Special Area Vallco Shopping District Special Area Neighborhoods North De Anza Gateway Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet Stelling Gateway West of Stelling Road: Maximum Residential Density 15 units per acre (southwest corner of Homestead and Stelling Roads) 35 units per acre (northwest corner of I-280 and Stelling Road) Maximum Height 30 feet East of Stelling Road: Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet Oaks Gateway Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet North Crossroads Node Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet South Vallco Park Maximum Residential Density 35 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet, or 60 feet with retail North Vallco Gateway West of Wolfe Road: Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 60 feet East of Wolfe Road: Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 75 feet (buildings located within 50 feet of the property lines abutting Wolfe Road, Pruneridge Avenue and Apple Campus 2 site shall not exceed 60 feet) City Center Node Maximum Residential Density 25 units per acre Maximum Height 45 feet or as existing, for existing buildings Building Planes: • Maintain the primary building bulk below a 1:1 slope line drawn from the arterial/boulevard curb line or lines except for the Crossroads Area. • For the Crossroads area, see the Crossroads Streetscape Plan. • For projects adjacent to residential areas: Heights and setbacks adjacent to residential areas will be determined during project review. • For the North and South Vallco Park areas (except for the Vallco Shopping District Special Area): Maintain the primary building bulk below a 1.5:1 (i.e., 1.5 feet of setback for every 1 foot of building height) slope line drawn from the Stevens Creek Blvd. and Homestead Road curb lines and below 1:1 slope line drawn from Wolfe Road and Tantau Avenue curb line. Rooftop Mechanical Equipment: Rooftop mechanical equipment and utility structures may exceed stipulated height limitations if they are enclosed, centrally located on the roof and not visible from adjacent streets. Priority Housing Sites: Notwithstanding the heights and densities shown above, the maximum heights and densities for Priority Housing Sites identified in the adopted Housing Element shall be as reflected in the Housing Element. Legend City Boundary Special Areas Homestead North Vallco Park Vallco Shopping District North De Anza South De Anza Bubb Road Monta Vista Village Avenues (Major Collectors) Boulevards (Arterials) Key Intersections Neighborhood Centers Heart of the City Hillside Transition Urban Service Area Sphere of Influence Urban Transition Avenues (Minor Collectors) Neighborhoods Neighborhoods Figure LU-1 COMMUNITY FORM DIAGRAM LU-17 NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL CENTERS Many of the City’s Housing Element sites are located in major corridors to reduce traffic and environmental impacts and preserve neighborhoods (Figure LU-2). Housing Element sites, which are further identified and defined in the Housing Element, represent the City’s priority for residential development. Residential uses on sites with mixed-use zoning should be designed on the “mixed-use village” concept discussed below. 1. Parcel assembly. Parcel assembly of the site is required. Further parcelization is highly discouraged in order to preserve the site for redevelopment in the future. 2. Plan for complete redevelopment. A plan for complete redevelopment of the site is required in order to ensure that the site can meet development standards and provide appropriate buffers. 3. “Mixed-Use Village” layout. An internal street grid with streets and alleys using “transect planning” (appropriate street and building types for each area), that is pedestrian-oriented, connects to existing streets, and creates walkable urban blocks for buildings and open space. 4. Uses. Include a substantial viable, retail component. Retail and active uses such as restaurants, outdoor dining, and entries are required along the ground floor of main street frontages. Mix of units for young professionals, couples and/ or active seniors who like to live in an active “mixed-use village” environment. Office uses, if allowed, should provide active uses on the ground floor street frontage, including restaurants, entries, lobbies, etc. 5. Open space. Open space in the form of a central town square with additional plazas and “greens” for community gathering spaces, public art, and community events. The locations and sizes will depend on the size of the site. 6. Architecture and urban design. Buildings should have high-quality, pedestrian- oriented architecture, and an emphasis on aesthetics, human scale, and creating a sense of place. 7. Parking. Parking in surface lots shall be located to the side or rear of buildings. Underground parking under buildings is preferred. Above grade structures shall not be located along major street frontages. In cases, where above-grade structures are allowed along internal street frontages, they shall be lined with retail, entries and active uses on the ground floor. All parking structures should be designed to be architecturally compatible with a high-quality “town center” environment. 8. Neighborhood buffers. Setbacks, landscaping and/or building transitions to buffer abutting single-family residential areas. MIXED-USE URBAN VILLAGES Neighborhood Commercial Centers serve adjacent neighborhoods and provide shopping and gathering places for residents. Retaining and enhancing neighborhood centers within and adjacent to neighborhoods throughout Cupertino supports the City’s goals for walkability, sustainability and creating gathering places for people. Figure LU-2 shows the location of the Neighborhood Commercial Centers in Cupertino. The Guiding Principles of sustainability and health in Community Vision 2040 support the retention and enhancement of neighborhood centers throughout the community, and providing pedestrian and bike connections to them from neighborhoods. Mixed-residential use may be considered if it promotes revitalization of retail uses, creation of new gathering spaces, and parcel assembly. Housing Element sites represent the City’s priority for residential development. Residential uses should be designed on the “mixed-use village” concept discussed in this Element. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY CHARACTER ELEMENT | cupertino community vision 2040CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-19 GOAL LU-3 Ensure that project site planning and building design enhance the public realm through a high sense of identity and connectivity SITE AND BUILDING DESIGN The City will seek to ensure that the site and building design of new projects enhance the public realm (e.g., streets, parks, plazas and open space areas) and that there is a focus on integrating connections to adjacent neighborhoods, where appropriate. POLICY LU-3.1: SITE PLANNING Ensure that project sites are planned appropriately to create a network of connected internal streets that improve pedestrian and bicycle access, provide public open space and building layouts that support city goals related to streetscape character for various Planning Areas and corridors. POLICY LU-3.2: BUILDING HEIGHTS AND SETBACK RATIOS Maximum heights and setback ratios are specified in the Community Form Diagram (Figure LU-2). As indicated in the figure, taller heights are focused on major corridors, gateways and nodes. Setback ratios are established to ensure that the desired relationship of buildings to the street is achieved. POLICY LU-3.3: BUILDING DESIGN Ensure that building layouts and design are compatible with the surrounding environment and enhance the streetscape and pedestrian activity. STRATEGIES: LU-3.3.1: Attractive Design. Emphasize attractive building and site design by paying careful attention to building scale, mass, placement, architecture, materials, landscaping, screening of equipment, loading areas, signage and other design considerations. LU-19 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-3.3.2: Mass and Scale. Ensure that the scale and interrelationships of new and old development complement each other. Buildings should be grouped to create a feeling of spatial unity. LU-3.3.3: Transitions. Buildings should be designed to avoid abrupt transitions with existing development, whether they are adjacent or across the street. Consider reduced heights, buffers and/or landscaping to transition to residential and/or low-intensity uses in order to reduce visual and privacy impacts. LU-3.3.4: Compatibility. Ensure that the floor area ratios of multi-family residential developments are compatible with buildings in the surrounding area. Include a mix of unit types and avoid excessively large units. LU-3.3.5: Building Location. Encourage building location and entries closer to the street while meeting appropriate landscaping and setback requirements. LU-3.3.6: Architecture and Articulation. Promote high-quality architecture, appropriate building articulation and use of special materials and architectural detailing to enhance visual interest. LU-3.3.7: Street Interface. Ensure development enhances pedestrian activity by providing active uses within mixed-use areas and appropriate design features within residential areas along a majority of the building frontage facing the street. Mixed-use development should include retail, restaurant, outdoor dining, main entries, etc. Residential development should include main entrances, lobbies, front stoops and porches, open space and other similar features. LU-3.3.8: Drive-up Services. Allow drive-up service facilities only when adequate circulation, parking, noise control, architectural features and landscaping are compatible with the expectations of the Planning Area, and when residential areas are visually buffered. Prohibit drive-up services in areas where pedestrian- oriented activity and design are highly encouraged, such as Heart of the City, North De Anza Boulevard, Monta Vista Village and neighborhood centers. LU-3.3.9: Specific and Conceptual Plans. Maintain and update Specific/ Conceptual plans and design guidelines for Special Areas such as Heart of the City, Crossroads, Homestead Corridor, Vallco Shopping District, North and South De Anza corridors and Monta Vista Village. LU-20 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-3.3.10: Entrances. In multi-family projects where residential uses may front on streets, require pedestrian-scaled elements such as entries, stoops and porches along the street. LU-3.3.11: Multiple-Story Buildings and Residential Districts. Allow construction of multiple- story buildings if it is found that nearby residential districts will not suffer from privacy intrusion or be overwhelmed by the scale of a building or group of buildings. POLICY LU-3.4: PARKING In surface lots, parking arrangements should be based on the successful operation of buildings; however, parking to the side or rear of buildings is desirable. No visible garages shall be permitted along the street frontage. Above grade structures shall not be located along street frontages and shall be lined with active uses on the ground floor on internal street frontages. Subsurface/deck parking is allowed provided it is adequately screened from the street and/or adjacent residential development. LU-21 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) STREETSCAPE DESIGN The City will seek to improve streetscapes throughout Cupertino with attractive landscaping, and complete and safe sidewalks. POLICY LU-4.1: STREET AND SIDEWALKS Ensure that the design of streets, sidewalks and pedestrian and bicycle amenities are consistent with the vision for each Planning Area and Complete Streets policies. POLICY LU-4.2: STREET TREES AND LANDSCAPING Ensure that tree planting and landscaping along streets visually enhances the streetscape and is consistent for the vision for each Planning Area (Special Areas and Neighborhoods): 1. Maximize street tree planting along arterial street frontages between buildings and/or parking lots. 2. Provide enhanced landscaping at the corners of all arterial intersections. 3. Enhance major arterials and connectors with landscaped medians to enhance their visual character and serve as traffic calming devices. 4. Develop uniform tree planting plans for arterials, connectors and neighborhood streets consistent with the vision for the Planning Area. 5. Landscape urban areas with formal planting arrangements. 6. Provide a transition to rural and semi-rural areas in the city, generally west of Highway 85, GOAL LU-4 Promote the unique character of planning areas and the goals for community character, connectivity and complete streets in streetscape design LU-22 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-5 Ensure that employment centers and neighborhoods have access to local retail and services within walking or bicycling distance CONNECTIVITY The City will ensure that employment centers and neighborhoods have access to desired and convenient amenities, such as local retail and services. POLICY LU-5.1: NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS Retain and enhance local neighborhood shopping centers and improve pedestrian and bicycle access to neighborhoods to improve access to goods and services. POLICY LU-5.2: MIXED-USE VILLAGES Where housing is allowed along major corridors or neighborhood commercial areas, development should promote mixed-use villages with active ground- floor uses and public space. The development should help create an inviting pedestrian environment and activity center that can serve adjoining neighborhoods and businesses. POLICY LU-5.3: ENHANCE CONNECTIONS Look for opportunities to enhance publicly-accessible pedestrian and bicycle connections with new development or redevelopment. LU-23 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-6.1: HISTORIC PRESERVATION Maintain and update an inventory of historically significant structures and sites in order to protect resources and promote awareness of the city’s history in the following four categories: Historic Sites, Commemorative Sites, Community Landmarks and Historic Mention Sites (Figure LU-3). POLICY LU-6.2: HISTORIC SITES Projects on Historic Sites shall meet the Secretary of Interior Standards for Treatment of Historic Properties. POLICY LU-6.3: HISTORIC SITES, COMMEMORATIVE SITES AND COMMUNITY LANDMARKS Projects on Historic Sites, Commemorative Sites and Community Landmarks shall provide a plaque, reader board and/or other educational tools on the site to explain the historic significance of the resource. The plaque shall include the city seal, name of resource, date it was built, a written description and photograph. The plaque shall be placed in a location where the public can view the information. HISTORIC PRESERVATION Cupertino has a rich and varied cultural history; however, only a few historic buildings and resources are preserved today. The City seeks to encourage preservation of these precious historic resources and encourage their enhancement in the future. GOAL LU-6 Preserve and protect the city’s historic and cultural resources LU-24 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-6.4: PUBLIC ACCESS Coordinate with property owners of public and quasi-public sites to allow public access of Historic and Commemorative Sites to foster public awareness and education. Private property owners will be highly encouraged, but not required, to provide public access to Historic and Commemorative Sites. POLICY LU-6.5: HISTORIC MENTION SITES These are sites outside the City’s jurisdiction that have contributed to the City’s history. Work with agencies that have jurisdiction over the historical resource to encourage adaptive reuse and rehabilitation and provide public access and plaques to foster public awareness and education. POLICY LU-6.6: INCENTIVES FOR PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC RESOURCES Utilize a variety of techniques to serve as incentives to foster the preservation and rehabilitation of Historic Resources including: 1. Allow flexible interpretation of the zoning ordinance not essential to public health and safety. This could include land use, parking requirements and/or setback requirements. 2. Use the California Historical Building Codes standards for rehabilitation of historic structures. 3. Tax rebates (Milles Act or Local tax rebates). 4. Financial incentives such as grants/loans to assist rehabilitation efforts. POLICY LU-6.7: HERITAGE TREES Protect and maintain the city’s heritage trees in a healthy state. STRATEGY: LU-6.7.1: Heritage Tree List. Establish and periodically revise a heritage tree list that includes trees of importance to the community. POLICY LU-6.8: CULTURAL RESOURCES Promote education related to the city’s history through public art in public and private developments. LU-25 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | cupertino community vision 2040 LU-1 FIGURE LU-3 HISTORIC RESOURCES FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Hanson Permanente Monta Vista Neighborhood Cupertino Historical Museum Memorial Park, Community Center, Sports Complex De Anza College De Anza Industrial Park Cupertino Civic Center Vallco Shopping District Vallco Industrial Park A B C D E F G H I Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Maryknoll Seminary Snyder Hammond House De La Vega Tack House Baer Blacksmith Enoch J. Parrish Tank House Nathan Hall Tank House Gazebo Trim Union Church of Cupertino Old Collins School Miller House Glendenning Barn McClellan Ranch Barn Seven Springs Ranch 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 12 13 13 De Anza Knoll Doyle Winery “Cupertino Wine Company” Stocklmeir Farmhouse Elisha Stephens Place Arroyo De San Joseph Cupertino Hazel Goldstone Variety Store Woelffel Cannery Engles Grocery “Paul and Eddie’s” Apple One Building Baldwin Winery Le Petit Trianon and Guest Cottages Interim City Hall City of Cupertino Crossroads St. Joseph’s Church 1 7 8 53 A I D H C E F B 9 10 11 2 4 G 6 2 1 3 4 8 12 7 14 2 10 1 114 5 133 9 6 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Heart of the City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Historic Sites Commemorative Sites 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Community Landmarks Montebello School, 1892 Perrone Ranch Stone Cellar, now part of Ridge Vineyards Picchetti Brothers Winery and Ranch Woodhills Estate 1 2 3 4 Sites of Historic Mention (outside city jurisdicition) LU-26 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | cupertino community vision 2040 Snyder Hammond House 22961 Stevens Creek Blvd. Old Collins School 20441 Homestead Road Cupertino De Oro Club Maryknoll Seminary 2300 Cristo Rey Drive Glendenning Barn 10955 N Tantau Avenue Baer Blacksmith 22221 McClellan Road McClellan Ranch Park Gazebo Trim Mary & Stevens Creek Blvd. Memorial Park Nathan Hall Tank House 22100 Stevens Creek Blvd. Enoch J. Parrish Tank House 22221 McClellan Road McClellan Ranch Park De La Vega Tack House Rancho Deep Cliff Club House Union Church of Cupertino 20900 Stevens Creek Blvd. Miller House 10518 Phil Place Historic Sites McClellan Ranch Barn 22221 McClellan Road Seven Springs Ranch 11801 Dorothy Anne Way LU-27 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Elisha Stephens Place 22100 Stevens Creek Boulevard Existing Plaque Doyle Winery “Cupertino Wine Company” Visible from McClellan Ranch Park (no photo available) De Anza Knoll Off of Cristo Rey Drive Le Petit Trianon and Guest Cottages 1250 Stevens Creek Boulevard Foothill-De Anza Community College Stocklmeir Farm House 22120 Stevens Creek Rd. Woelffel Cannery 10120 Imperial Avenue Demolished St. Josephs Church 10110 North de Anza Boulevard Apple One Building 10240 Bubb Road Arroyo De San Joseph Cupertino 21840 McClellan Road – Monta Vista High School, State of California Historical Landmark #800 The Crossroads Intersection at Stevens Creek Boulevard and De Anza Boulevard Interim City Hall 10321 South De Anza Boulevard LU-28 Commemorative Sites CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Baldwin Winery 1250 Stevens Creek Boulevard, Foothill-De Anza Community College Engles Grocery “Paul and Eddie’s” 1619 Stevens Creek Boulevard Hazel Goldstone Variety Store, 21700 Stevens Creek Boulevard Perrone Ranch Stone Cellar: Ridge Vineyards 17100 Montebello Road, Mid-Peninsula Regional Open Space District Woodhills Estate Cupertino/Saratoga Hills, End of Prospect Road – Mid-Peninsula Regional Open Space District, National Register of Historic Places Picchetti Brothers Winery 13100 Montebello Road – Mid-Peninsula Regional Open Space District Montebello School 15101 Montebello Road LU-29LU-29 Commemorative Sites (continued) Sites of Historic Mention CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-7.1: PUBLIC ART Stimulate opportunities for the arts through development and cooperation with agencies and the business community. STRATEGIES: LU-7.1.1: Public Art Ordinance. Maintain and update an ordinance requiring public art in public as well as private projects of a certain size. LU-7.1.2: Gateways. Promote placement of visible artwork in gateways to the city. LU-7.1.3: Artist Workspace. Encourage the development of artist workspace, such as live/work units, in appropriate location in the city. Note: see the Recreation and Community Services Element for policies related to programming. LU-30 GOAL LU-7 Promote a civic environment where the arts express an innovative spirit, cultural diversity and inspire community participation ARTS AND CULTURE Cupertino history and diversity provides a rich background for community art and culture. The City seeks to encourage support public art and the arts community through development. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-5 Ensure that employment centers and neighborhoods have access to local retail and services within walking or bicycling distance GOAL LU-8 Maintain a fiscally sustainable city government that preserves and enhances the quality of life for its residents, workers and visitors FISCAL STABILITY The City will seek to identify strategies and programs that ensure the long-term fiscal health of the City. POLICY LU-8.1: FISCAL IMPACTS Evaluate fiscal impacts of converting office/commercial uses to residential use, while ensuring that the city meets regional housing requirements. POLICY LU-8.2: LAND USE Encourage land uses that generate City revenue. STRATEGY: LU-8.2.1: Fiscal Impacts. Evaluate fiscal impacts of converting office/commercial uses to residential use, while ensuring that the city meets regional housing requirements. POLICY LU-8.3: INCENTIVES FOR REINVESTMENT Provide incentives for reinvestment in existing, older commercial areas. STRATEGIES: LU-8.3.1: Mixed-Use. Consider mixed-use (office, commercial, residential) in certain commercial areas to encourage reinvestment and revitalization of sales-tax producing uses, when reviewing sites for regional housing requirements. LU-31 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-8.3.2: Shared or Reduced Parking. Consider shared or reduced parking, where appropriate as incentives to construct new commercial and mixed- use development, while increasing opportunities for other modes of transportation. LU-8.3.3: Infrastructure and Streetscape Improvements. Consider infrastructure and streetscape improvements in areas, such as the Crossroads or South Vallco area to encourage redevelopment as a pedestrian- oriented area that meets community design goals. LU-8.3.4: High Sales-Tax Producing Retail Uses. Consider locations for high sales-tax producing retail uses (such as life- style and hybrid commodity-specialty centers) provided the development is compatible with the surrounding area in terms of building scale and traffic. POLICY LU-8.4: PROPERTY ACQUISITION Maximize revenue from City-owned land and resources, and ensure that the City’s land acquisition strategy is balanced with revenues. POLICY LU-8.5: EFFICIENT OPERATIONS Plan land use and design projects to allow the City to maintain efficient operations in the delivery of services including, community centers, parks, roads, and storm drainage, and other infrastructure. LU-32 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-5 Ensure that employment centers and neighborhoods have access to local retail and services within walking or bicycling distance GOAL LU-9 Promote a strong local economy that attracts and retains a variety of businesses POLICY LU-9.1: COLLABORATION WITH BUSINESS COMMUNITY Collaborate with the business community to facilitate growth, development and infrastructure improvements that benefit residents and businesses. STRATEGIES: LU-9.1.1: Economic Development Strategy Plan. Create and periodically update an Economic Development Strategy Plan in order to ensure the City’s long-term fiscal health and stability and to make Cupertino an attractive place to live, work and play. LU-9.1.2: Partnerships. Create partnerships between the City and other public, and private and non-profit organizations to provide improvements and services that benefit the community. LU-9.1.3: Economic Development and Business Retention. Encourage new businesses and retain existing businesses that provide local shopping and services, add to municipal revenues, contribute to economic vitality and enhance the City’s physical environment. LU-9.1.4: Regulations. Periodically review and update land use and zoning requirements for retail, commercial and office development in order to attract high-quality sales-tax producing businesses and services, while adapting to the fast- changing retail, commercial and office environment. LU-9.1.5: Incubator Work Space. Encourage the development of flexible and affordable incubator work space for start-ups and new and emerging technologies. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The City will seek to identify strategies and programs that support and retain local businesses, and attract new businesses and investment. LU-33 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-9.1.6: Development Review. Provide efficient and timely review of development proposals, while maintaining quality standards in accordance with city codes. Look for a solution-based approach to problems while being responsive to community concerns and promote positive communication among parties. POLICY LU-9.2: WORK ENVIRONMENT Encourage the design of projects to take into account the well-being and health of employees and the fast- changing work environment. STRATEGIES: LU-9.2.1: Local Amenities. Encourage office development to locate in areas where workers can walk or bike to services such as shopping and restaurants, and to provide walking and bicycling connections to services. LU-9.2.2: Workplace Policies. Encourage public and private employers to provide workplace policies that enhance and improve the health and well-being of their employees. LU-34 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-10 Promote effective coordination with regional and local agencies on planning issues REGIONAL COOPERATION AND COORDINATION The City will work with regional agencies to coordinate with regional plans and address community priorities by participating in the planning process. POLICY LU-10.1: REGIONAL DECISIONS Coordinate with regional and local agencies on planning, transportation, economic development and sustainability issues to ensure that the decisions improve fiscal health and the quality of life for Cupertino residents and businesses. POLICY LU-10.2: REGIONAL PLANNING COORDINATION Review regional planning documents prior to making decisions at the local level. POLICY LU-10.3: NEIGHBORING JURISDICTIONS Collaborate with neighboring jurisdictions on issues of mutual interest. POLICY LU-10.4: URBAN SERVICE AREA Work with neighboring jurisdictions to create boundaries that are defined by logical municipal service areas. STRATEGY: LU-10.4.1: Tax-Sharing Agreements. Consider entering into tax-sharing agreements with adjacent jurisdictions in order to facilitate desired boundary realignments. POLICY LU-10.5: ANNEXATION Actively pursue the annexation of unincorporated properties within the City’s urban service area, including the Creston neighborhoods, which will be annexed on a parcel-by-parcel basis with new development. Other remaining unincorporated islands will be annexed as determined by the City Council. LU-35 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-11 Maintain and enhance community access to library and school services provided by other agencies POLICY LU-11.1: CONNECTIVITY Create pedestrian and bicycle access between new developments and community facilities. Review existing neighborhood circulation to improve safety and access for students to walk and bike to schools, parks, and community facilities such as the library. POLICY LU-11.2: DE ANZA COLLEGE Allow land uses not traditionally considered part of a college to be built at De Anza College, provided such uses integrate the campus into the community, provide facilities and services not offered in the City and/ or alleviate impacts created by the college. LU-36 ACCESS TO COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES The City will seek to improve connectivity and access to public facilities and services, including De Anza College. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-12 Preserve and protect the City’s hillside natural habitat and aesthetic values LU-37 POLICY LU-12.1: LAND USE REGULATIONS Establish and maintain building and development standards for hillsides that ensure hillside protection. STRATEGIES: LU-12.1.1: Ordinance and Development Review. Through building regulations and development review, limit development on ridgelines, hazardous geological areas and steep slopes. Control colors and materials and minimize the illumination of outdoor lighting. Reduce visible building mass with measures including, stepping structures down the hillside, following natural contours, and limiting the height and mass of the wall plane facing the valley floor. LU-12.1.2: Slope-Density Formula. Apply a slope-density formula to very low intensity residential development in the hillsides. Density shall be calculated based on the foothill modified, foothill modified ½ acre and the 5-20 acre slope density formula. Actual lot sizes and development areas will be determined through zoning ordinances, clustering and identification of significant natural features and geological constraints. HILLSIDES The City seeks to establish clear hillside policy in order to provide for the realistic use of privately-owned hillside lands, while preserving natural and aesthetic features. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-12.1.3: 1976 General Plan- Previously Designated Very Low Density: Semi-Rural 5-Acre. Properties previously designated Very Low-Density Residential: Semi-Rural 5-acre per the 1976 General Plan may be subdivided utilizing that formula. Properties that have already been since subdivided in conformance with the above designation have no further subdivision potential for residential purposes. LU-12.1.4: Existing lots in Foothill Modified and Foothill Modified 1/2–Acre Slope Density Designations. Require discretionary review with a hillside exception for hillside or R1 properties if development is proposed on substandard parcels on slopes per the R1 and RHS zoning. POLICY LU-12.2: CLUSTERING SUBDIVISIONS Cluster lots in major subdivisions and encourage clustering in minor subdivisions, for projects in the 5-20-acre slope density designation. Reserve 90 percent of the land in private open space to protect the unique characteristics of the hillsides from adverse environmental impacts. Keep the open space areas contiguous as much as possible. POLICY LU-12.3: RURAL IMPROVEMENT STANDARDS IN HILLSIDE AREAS Require rural improvement standards in hillside areas to preserve the rural character of the hillsides. Improvement standards should balance the need to furnish adequate utility and emergency services against the need to protect the hillside, vegetation and animals. STRATEGIES: LU-12.3.1: Grading. Follow natural land contours and avoid mass of grading of sites during construction, especially in flood hazard or geologically sensitive areas. Grading hillside sites into large, flat areas shall be avoided. LU-12.3.2: Roads. Roads should be narrowed to avoid harming trees and streambeds. LU-12.3.3: Trees. Retain significant specimen trees, especially when they grow in groves or clusters and integrate them into the developed site. POLICY LU-12.4: HILLSIDE VIEWS The Montebello foothills at the south and west boundary of the valley floor provide a scenic backdrop, adding to the City’s scale and variety. While it is not possible to guarantee an unobstructed view of the hills from every vantage point, an attempt should be made to preserve views of the foothills. LU-38 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-39 STRATEGIES: LU-12.4.1: Views from Public Facilities. Design public facilities, particularly open spaces, so they include views of the foothills or other nearby natural features, and plan hillside developments to minimize visual and other impacts on adjacent public open space. LU-12.4.2: Developments near Public Space. Located private driveways and building sites as far as possible from property boundaries adjoining public open space preserves and parks to enhance the natural open space character and protect plant and animal habitat. POLICY LU-12.5: DEVELOPMENT IN THE COUNTY JURISDICTION Development in the County, particularly if located near Cupertino’s hillsides and urban fringe area, should consider the goals and policies in Community Vision 2040. STRATEGY: LU-12.5.1: County Development. Development in these areas should be compatible with Cupertino’s hillside policies of low-intensity residential, agricultural or open space uses. Preservation of the natural environment, clustering sites to minimize impact and dedication of open space are encouraged. Visual impacts, access, traffic and other impacts, and service demands should be assessed in consultation with Cupertino’s goals and policies. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-40 PLANNING AREA GOALS AND POLICIES As outlined in the Planning Areas chapter, Community Vision 2040 organizes the city into 21 distinct Planning Areas, divided into two categories: (1) Special Areas that are expected to transition over the life of the General Plan and (2) Neighborhoods where future changes are expected to be minimal. The following goals, policies and strategies are specific to the Planning Areas and provide guidance for future change in accordance with the community vision. Figure LU-2 shows maximum heights and residential densities allowed in each Special Area. SPECIAL AREAS Special Areas are located along major mixed-use corridors and nodes that have access to a variety of different forms of transportation. Future growth in Cupertino will be focused in these areas to manage growth while minimizing traffic, greenhouse gas and health impacts on the community. The discussion for each Special Area outlines goals, policies and strategies related to land use, building form, streetscape, connectivity, open space, landscaping, and the urban/ rural ecosystem in order to help implement the community vision for these areas. CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-13 Ensure a cohesive, landscaped boulevard that supports all modes of transportation, links its distinct and active commercial and mixed-use sub-areas and notes, and creates a high-quality, distinct community image and a vibrant heart for Cupertino POLICY LU-13.1: HEART OF THE CITY SPECIFIC PLAN The Heart of the City Specific Plan provides design standards and guidelines for this area, which promote a cohesive, landscaped boulevard that links its distinct sub- areas and is accessible to all modes of transportation. POLICY LU-13.2: REDEVELOPMENT Encourage older properties along the boulevard to be redeveloped and enhanced. Allow more intense development only in nodes and gateways as indicated in the Community Form Diagram (Figure LU-2). HEART OF THE CITY SPECIAL AREA The Heart of the City will remain the core commercial corridor in Cupertino, with a series of commercial and mixed-use centers and a focus on creating a walkable, bikeable boulevard that can support transit. General goals, policies and strategies will apply throughout the entire area; while more specific goals, policies and strategies for each subarea are designed to address their individual settings and characteristics. LU-41 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-13.3: PARCEL ASSEMBLY Encourage the assembly of parcels to foster new development projects that can provide high-quality development with adequate buffers for neighborhoods. POLICY LU-13.4: NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS AND ACTIVITY AREAS A majority of the commercial development allocation should be devoted to rehabilitating neighborhood centers and major activity centers with a focus on creating pedestrian- oriented, walkable and bikeable areas with inviting community gathering places. Land uses between the activity centers should help focus and support activity in the centers. Neighborhood centers should be retrofitted and redeveloped using the “neighborhood commercial centers” concept discussed earlier in this Element. POLICY LU-13.5: LAND USE The Heart of the City area allows a mix of retail, commercial, office and residential uses. Specific uses are provided in the Heart of the City Specific Plan. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. POLICY LU-13.6: BUILDING FORM Buildings should be high-quality, with pedestrian-oriented and active uses along the street. POLICY LU-13.7: STREETSCAPE AND CONNECTIVITY Create a walkable and bikeable boulevard with active uses and a distinct image for each subarea. STRATEGIES: LU-13.7.1: Streetscape. Provide active uses along the street frontage, bike lanes, sidewalks that support pedestrian-oriented activity, improved pedestrian crossings at street intersections, and attractive transit facilities (e.g., bus stops, benches, etc.). LU-13.7.2: Street trees and Landscaping. Create a cohesive visual image with street tree plantings along the corridor, but with distinct tree types for each sub-area to support its distinct character and function. LU-13.7.3: Connectivity. Properties within a block should be inter-connected with shared access drives. Provide pedestrian paths to enhance public access to and through the development. New development, particularly on corner lots, should provide pedestrian and bicycle improvements along side streets to enhance connections to surrounding neighborhoods. LU-42 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-13.7.4: Traffic Calming. Evaluate options on Stevens Creek Boulevard to improve the pedestrian environment by proactively managing speed limits, enforcement, and traffic signal synchronization. LU-13.7.5: Neighborhood Buffers. Consider buffers such as setbacks, landscaping and/or building transitions to buffer abutting single- family residential areas from visual and noise impacts. LU-43 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-14.1: LAND USE Primary land uses include quasi- public/public facilities, with supporting mixed commercial/ residential uses. POLICY LU-14.2: STREETSCAPE Street tree planting that supports an active, pedestrian-oriented environment. Street tree planting should provide a connection with the adjacent foothills with trees such as oaks. POLICY LU-14.3: GATEWAY CONCEPT Buildings should be high-quality in keeping with the gateway character of the area. Projects should provide or contribute towards gateway signs and landscaping. POLICY LU-14.4: DE ANZA COLLEGE NODE Buildings should be designed to fit into the surroundings with pedestrian-orientation. Externalizing activities by providing cafeterias, bookstores and plazas along the street and near corners is encouraged. POLICY LU-14.5: OAKS GATEWAY NODE This is a gateway retail and shopping node. New residential, if allowed, should be designed on the “mixed-use village” concept discussed earlier in this Element. POLICY LU-14.6: COMMUNITY RECREATION NODE Contribute to the high-quality streetscape with trees, sidewalks, building and site design, and active uses such as main entries, lobbies or similar features along the street to reinforce pedestrian orientation. GOAL LU-14 Create a public and civic gateway supported by mixed-commercial and residential uses WEST STEVENS CREEK BOULEVARD SUBAREA LU-44 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-15.1: CROSSROADS STREETSCAPE PLAN Create a streetscape plan for the Crossroads Subarea that provides design standards and guidelines for an attractive, walkable, vibrant shopping village, where commercial and roadway design encourage pedestrian activity. The plan will include the following elements: 1. Land use plan specifying the type, intensity and arrangement of land uses to promote pedestrian and business activity. 2. Streetscape plan that provides for an attractive pedestrian streetscape. 3. Design guidelines that foster pedestrian activity and a sense of place. STRATEGIES: LU-15.1.1: Uses. Include in this subarea primary uses such as retail, office and commercial. Ground floor uses shall have active retail uses with storefronts. Commercial office and office uses may be allowed on upper levels. In the case of deep lots, buildings along the street should provide retail and buildings in the back may be developed with allowed uses. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. LU-15.1.2: Streetscape. Primary ground-floor entrances shall face the street. The streetscape shall consist of wide pedestrians sidewalks with inviting street furniture, street trees, pedestrian-scaled lighting with banners, small plazas, art/water features, pedestrian crosswalks CROSSROADS SUBAREA GOAL LU-15 Create an active, pedestrian-oriented shopping district with vibrant retail uses and entries along the street, outdoor dining and plazas or public gathering spaces LU-45 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) with special paving, and other elements identified in the Crossroads Streetscape Plan. LU-15.1.3: Building Form. Buildings should be moderately- scaled with high-quality, pedestrian- oriented scaled, active uses along the street. LU-15.1.4: Shared Parking. Require shared parking and access arrangements throughout the area, with overall parking standards reflecting the shared parking. LU-15.1.5: De Anza Boulevard/Stevens Creek Boulevard Landmark. Secure permanent landscape easements as a condition of development from properties at the intersection of De Anza and Stevens Creek Boulevards for construction of a future landmark. The landmark may include open space, landscaping and other design elements at the corners. Land at the southeast corner will remain a publicly accessible park . LU-46 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-16.1: CITY CENTER NODE Establish the City Center Node as a moderately-scaled, medium-density mixed-use office, hotel, retail and residential area, with an integrated network of streets and open space. STRATEGIES: LU-16.1.1: Uses. A mix of uses including, office, hotel, retail, residential and civic uses. The ground floor of buildings along the street should be activated with pedestrian-oriented, active uses including retail, restaurants, and entries. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. LU-16.1.2: Connectivity. New development should improve the connectivity within the block and with surrounding streets, including connections to the Crossroads Subarea. LU-16.1.3: Building Form. Buildings should be moderately- scaled to transition from existing taller buildings to the scale of the surrounding area. Taller buildings should provide appropriate transitions to fit into the surrounding area. LU-16.1.4: Gateway Concept. Buildings should be designed with high-quality architecture and landscaping befitting the gateway character of the site. LU-16.1.5: Open Space. A publicly-accessible park shall be retained at the southeast corner of Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevard and shall include public art, seating areas and plazas for retail and restaurant uses along the ground floor of adjacent buildings. POLICY LU-16.2: CIVIC CENTER NODE Create a civic heart for Cupertino that enables community building by providing community facilities, meeting and gathering spaces, public art, and space for recreation and community events. CITY CENTER SUBAREA GOAL LU-16 Maintain a mixed-use and civic district that will enhance community identity and activity, and support the crossroads subarea LU-47 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-17.1: LAND USE Allow a mix of uses including commercial, retail, commercial office and limited residential uses. The ground floor of buildings along the street should be activated with pedestrian-oriented, active uses including retail, restaurants, entries, etc. Neighborhood centers shall be remodeled or redeveloped using the “neighborhood commercial centers” concept described earlier in this Element. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. GOAL LU-17 Retain and enhance as a walkable, bikeable, commercial mixed-use boulevard with neighborhood centers, office and limited residential uses CENTRAL STEVENS CREEK BOULEVARD SUBAREA LU-48 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-18.1: LAND USE Allow regional commercial with retail, commercial, office and hotels as the primary uses, with residential mixed-use as a supporting use. Retail, restaurant and other actives uses are highly encouraged on the ground floor facing the street. In case of office complexes, active uses such as entries, lobbies or plazas should be provided on the ground floor along the street. Neighborhood centers shall be remodeled or redeveloped using the “neighborhood commercial centers” concept described earlier in this Element. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. POLICY LU-18.2 SOUTH VALLCO Retain and enhance the South Vallco area as a mixed-use retail, office and residential district with a pedestrian- oriented, downtown atmosphere. STRATEGIES: LU-18.2.1: Uses. Encourage a mix of retail, commercial, office, residential and hotel uses. Provide active retail uses on the ground floor facing the street or outdoor pedestrian corridor with connections to adjacent development. Office sites to the north of Vallco Parkway are encouraged to provide retail uses. However, if retail is not provided, office sites should provide entries and active uses along the street frontage. LU-18.2.2: Vallco Parkway. Vallco Parkway is envisioned as a parkway with bike lanes, wide sidewalks, street-trees and on-street parking. The street will connect to a future street grid in the Vallco Shopping District. EAST STEVENS CREEK BOULEVARD SUBAREA GOAL LU-18 Create a walkable, bikeable mixed-use boulevard with pedestrian-oriented regional and neighborhood commercial, retail, hotel and office uses LU-49 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-19.1: SPECIFIC PLAN Create a Vallco Shopping District Specific Plan prior to any development on the site that lays out the land uses, design standards and guidelines, and infrastructure improvements required. The Specific Plan will be based on the following strategies: STRATEGIES: LU-19.1.1: Master Developer. Redevelopment will require a master developer in order remove the obstacles to the development of a cohesive district with the highest levels of urban design. LU-19.1.2: Parcel Assembly. Parcel assembly and a plan for complete redevelopment of the site is required prior to adding residential and office uses. Parcelization is highly discouraged in order to preserve the site for redevelopment in the future. LU-19.1.3: Complete Redevelopment. The “town center” plan should be based on complete redevelopment of the site in order to ensure that the site can be planned to carry out the community vision. LU-19.1.4: Land Use. The following uses are allowed on the site (see Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria): GOAL LU-19 Create a distinct and memorable mixed-use "town center" that is a regional destination and a focal point for the community VALLCO SHOPPING DISTRICT SPECIAL AREA The City envisions a complete redevelopment of the existing Vallco Fashion Mall into a vibrant mixed-use “town center” that is a focal point for regional visitors and the community. This new Vallco Shopping District will become a destination for shopping, dining and entertainment in the Santa Clara Valley. LU-50 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) 1. Retail: High-performing retail, restaurant and entertainment uses. Maintain a minimum of 600,000 square feet of retail that provide a good source of sales tax for the City. Entertainment uses may be included but shall consist of no more than 30 percent of retail uses. 2. Hotel: Encourage a business class hotel with conference center and active uses including main entrances, lobbies, retail and restaurants on the ground floor. 3. Residential: Allow residential on upper floors with retail and active uses on the ground floor. Encourage a mix of units for young professionals, couples and/or active seniors who like to live in an active “town center” environment. 4. Office: Encourage high-quality office space arranged in a pedestrian-oriented street grid with active uses on the ground floor, publicly-accessible streets and plazas/green space. LU-19.1.5: “Town Center” Layout. Create streets and blocks laid out using “transect planning” (appropriate street and building types for each area), which includes a discernible center and edges, public space at center, high quality public realm, and land uses appropriate to the street and building typology. LU-19.1.6: Connectivity. Provide a newly configured complete street grid hierarchy of streets, boulevards and alleys that is pedestrian-oriented, connects to existing streets, and creates walkable urban blocks for buildings and open space. It should also incorporate transit facilities, provide connections to other transit nodes and coordinate with the potential expansion of Wolfe Road bridge over Interstate 280 to continue the walkable, bikeable boulevard concept along Wolfe Road. The project should also contribute towards a study and improvements to a potential Interstate 280 trail along the drainage channel south of the freeway and provide pedestrian and bicycle connections from the project sites to the trail. LU-19.1.7: Existing Streets. Improve Stevens Creek Boulevard and Wolfe Road to become more bike and pedestrian-friendly with bike lanes, wide sidewalks, street trees, improved pedestrian intersections to accommodate the connections to Rosebowl and Main Street. LU-51 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-19.1.8: Open Space. Open space in the form of a central town square on the west and east sides of the district interspersed with plazas and “greens” that create community gathering spaces, locations for public art, and event space for community events. LU-19.1.9: Building Form. Buildings should have high-quality architecture, and an emphasis on aesthetics, human scale, and create a sense of place. Taller buildings should provide appropriate transitions to fit into the surrounding area. LU-19.1.10: Gateway Character. High-quality buildings with architecture and materials befitting the gateway character of the site. The project should provide gateway signage and treatment. LU-19.1.11: Phasing Plan. A phasing plan that lays out the timing of infrastructure, open space and land use improvements that ensures that elements desired by the community are included in early phases. LU-19.1.12: Parking. Parking in surface lots shall be located to the side or rear of buildings. Underground parking beneath buildings is preferred. Above grade structures shall not be located along major street frontages. In cases, where above-grade structures are allowed along internal street frontages, they shall be lined with retail, entries and active uses on the ground floor. All parking structures should be designed to be architecturally compatible with a high- quality “town center” environment. LU-19.1.13: Trees. Retain trees along the Interstate 280, Wolfe Road and Stevens Creek Boulevard to the extent feasible, when new development are proposed. LU-19.1.14: Neighborhood Buffers. Consider buffers such as setbacks, landscaping and/or building transitions to buffer abutting single- family residential areas from visual and noise impacts. LU-52 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-20.1: LAND USE This area is a major employment node with office, and research and development uses. Retail and hotel uses are allowed on the west side of Wolfe Road. Redevelopment of the retail site at the corner of Wolfe and Homestead Roads should be based on the “neighborhood commercial centers” concept described earlier in this Element. Retail uses are not required on the Hamptons site. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. POLICY LU-20.2: STREETSCAPE AND CONNECTIVITY Future roadway improvements on Wolfe Road, Homestead Road and Tantau Avenue should be coordinated with planned improvements to improve pedestrian, bike and transit connections. Streetscape improvements will enhance the pedestrian environment with street trees, attractive bus shelters and street furniture. The campus site should provide an attractive landscaped edge along the street. Future improvements to the Wolfe Road bridge should be coordinated to preserve the vision for this area. GOAL LU-20 Support a sustainable campus environment that is served by a mix of pedestrian- oriented retail and commercial uses in a walkable and bikeable environment NORTH VALLCO PARK SPECIAL AREA The North Vallco Park Special Area is envisioned to become a sustainable, office and campus environment surrounded by a mix of connected, high-quality, pedestrian-oriented retail, hotels and residential uses. Taller buildings could be built at gateway nodes close to Interstate 280. LU-53 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-20.3: BUILDING FORM Buildings in the retail and hotel area should provide active, pedestrian- oriented uses along the street. Buildings should transition to fit the scale of the surrounding area. Taller buildings should provide appropriate transitions to fit into the surrounding area. In addition to the height limits established in the Community Form Diagram, buildings abutting the campus shall incorporate appropriate setbacks, landscaped buffering, and building height transitions to minimize privacy and security impacts. POLICY LU-20.4: PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE CONNECTIONS Pedestrian-oriented retail and hotel development will support a diverse population of workers and residents in the area. Trail routes, and alternate trail routes to address security and privacy concerns of major employers, shall be developed to provide pedestrian and bicycle connections to other destinations. POLICY LU-20.5: GATEWAY CONCEPT Building and landscape design should be of high quality and reflect the fact that this area is a gateway into Cupertino from Interstate 280 and points north. The project should provide gateway signage and treatment. POLICY LU-20.6: NEIGHBORHOOD BUFFERS Provide building transitions, setbacks and/or landscaping to buffer development from adjoining single- family residential uses. LU-54 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-21.1: CONCEPTUAL PLAN Amend the North De Anza Conceptual Plan to create a cohesive set of land use and streetscape regulations and guidelines for the North De Anza area. POLICY LU-21.2: LAND USE Primarily office, and research and development uses supplemented with limited commercial and residential uses. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. POLICY LU-21.3: STREETSCAPE AND CONNECTIVITY North De Anza is envisioned as a walkable, bikeable boulevard with wide sidewalks with street trees and roadway improvements for bike lanes and pedestrian crossings. Pedestrian and bike improvements and enhanced pedestrian crossings are also envisioned along other streets in this area to create an interconnected grid. Such improvements will also improve school routes from the Garden Gate neighborhood to Lawson school to the east and provide access to transit routes. GOAL LU-21 Maintain an employment node served by a mix of pedestrian-oriented retail, commercial and hotel uses in a walkable and bikeable environment NORTH DE ANZA SPECIAL AREA The North De Anza Special Area is expected to remain an employment node. Its designation as a Priority Development Area (PDA) and the availability of restaurants and services in the Heart of the City Special Area opens opportunities to locate higher density office uses along the corridor with connections to Stevens Creek Boulevard in a pedestrian and bicycle-oriented format. The streets in this area are envisioned to work as a walkable, bikeable grid that enhance connections for school children and residents from the Garden Gate neighborhood to Lawson Middle School and other services on the east side. LU-55 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-21.4: BUILDING DESIGN Locate buildings along the street with parking areas to the rear. Break up massing of large office buildings along the street with pedestrian scaled elements and locate building entries and active uses along the street frontage to improve the pedestrian character of the area. Mixed-use buildings should include entries, active uses and gathering spaces along the street. POLICY LU-21.5: GATEWAY CONCEPT Building and landscape design should be of high quality and reflect the fact that this area is a gateway into Cupertino from Interstate 280 and points north. POLICY LU-21.6: NEIGHBORHOOD BUFFER Provide building transitions, setbacks and/or landscaping to buffer development from adjoining single- family residential uses. LU-56 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-22.1: CONCEPTUAL PLAN Maintain and implement the existing South De Anza and Sunnyvale- Saratoga Conceptual Plans POLICY LU-22.2: LAND USE General commercial and retail uses with limited commercial office, office and residential uses. Neighborhood centers should be redeveloped in the “neighborhood commercial centers” concept discussed earlier in this Element. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. POLICY LU-22.3: PARCEL ASSEMBLY Highly encourage assembly of parcels to resolve the fragmented and narrow lot pattern and encourage high-quality development with adequate buffers for neighborhoods. POLICY LU-22.4: STREETSCAPE AND CONNECTIVITY South De Anza is envisioned as a walkable, bikeable boulevard with sidewalks, street trees and roadway improvements for bike lanes and pedestrian crossings. Side streets SOUTH DE ANZA SPECIAL AREA The South De Anza Special Area will remain a predominantly general commercial area with supporting existing mixed residential uses with neighborhood centers providing services to neighborhoods and nodes. The policies in this area are intended to encourage parcel assembly to resolve the fragmented and narrow lot pattern, promote active retail and service uses, bike and pedestrian friendly improvements, and connectivity to adjacent neighborhoods. GOAL LU-22 Maintain a commercial boulevard with neighborhood centers, commercial office and residential uses that provide services and gathering spaces for the community in a walkable and bikeable environment LU-57 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) are also envisioned with pedestrian and bicycle improvements to ensure walkable connections from adjacent neighborhoods. POLICY LU-22.5: SHARED ACCESS Since South De Anza is a heavily traveled route, properties in the same block should be connected with auto and pedestrian access through shared access easements to reduce impacts on the corridor. POLICY LU-22.6: BUILDING DESIGN Locate buildings and commercial pads along the street with parking areas to the side and rear. Provide pedestrian- scaled elements and active uses including retail, restaurants, and entries along the street. Outdoor plaza and activity areas can be located along the street with sidewalk and street trees to buffer them from through traffic. POLICY LU-22.7: GATEWAY CONCEPT Building and landscape design should be of high quality and reflect the fact that this area has gateways from Highway 85 and at the southern and eastern borders of Cupertino. POLICY LU-22.8: NEIGHBORHOOD BUFFER Provide building transitions, setbacks and/or landscaping to buffer development from adjoining single- family residential uses. LU-58 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-23.1: CONCEPTUAL PLAN Create a conceptual plan for the Homestead Road Special Area with a cohesive set of land use and streetscape regulations and guidelines. POLICY LU-23.2: LAND USE Primarily retail, commercial and residential uses, with some limited quasi-public use. Redevelopment of neighborhood centers should be based on the “neighborhood center” concept discussed earlier in this element. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. HOMESTEAD SPECIAL AREA The Homestead Special Area will continue to be a predominantly mixed-use retail commercial area with residential uses and neighborhood centers providing services to local residents. Bike and pedestrian improvements to the roadways in this area will provide better connections for residents and workers to access services. Tree-lined streets and sidewalks will provide an inviting environment and will link existing and new uses. GOAL LU-23 Retain a commercial and residential boulevard that forms a gateway into Cupertino with neighborhood centers, commercial office and residential uses that provide services and gathering spaces for the community in a walkable and bikeable environment LU-59 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-23.3: CONNECTIVITY Homestead Road is envisioned to become a boulevard with bike and pedestrian improvements and new bicycle and pedestrian crossings at De Anza Boulevard, Blaney Avenue, Wolfe Road, and Tantau Avenue. This will provide better access for people moving east/west through the city north of Interstate 280, linking neighborhoods in the western part of the city with Homestead High School, Homestead Square Shopping Center and Apple Campus 2 to the east. POLICY LU-23.4: BUILDING DESIGN Buildings will be located closer to the street with parking mostly to the side and rear. In the case of larger sites, large buildings may be placed behind parking; however a substantial portion of the front of the site should be lined with active uses such as retail/restaurant pads, and plazas. Buildings should include pedestrian- oriented elements with entries, retail, lobbies, and active uses along the street. Parking areas along the street will be screened with street trees. Residential buildings will provide stoops and porches along the street and side streets. Taller buildings should provide appropriate transitions to fit into the surrounding area. POLICY LU-23.5: GATEWAY CONCEPT Building and landscape design should be of high quality and reflect the fact that this area is a gateway into the northern part of Cupertino. POLICY LU-23.6: NEIGHBORHOOD BUFFER Provide building transitions, setbacks and/or landscaping to buffer development from adjoining single- family residential uses. LU-60 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-24.1: LAND USE Allowed uses in the Bubb Road Special Area will consist of those described in the ML-RC ordinance with limited commercial and residential uses. POLICY LU-24.2: STREETSCAPE AND CONNECTIVITY Bubb Road is envisioned as a walkable, bikeable corridor with sidewalks, street trees and roadway improvements for bike lanes and pedestrian crossings. Pedestrian and bike improvements and enhanced pedestrian crossings are also envisioned along other streets in this area to create an interconnected grid. Such improvements will also improve routes from the northern and eastern neighborhood to the tri-school area, parks and services and reduce impacts caused by to school and employment traffic. GOAL LU-24 Maintain an employment area with light- industrial, and research and development uses in walkable and bikeable environment that connects to surrounding nodes and services BUBB ROAD SPECIAL AREA The Bubb Road Special Area is envisioned to become a tree-lined avenue that is bike and pedestrian friendly with an improved public and internal street grid, since it is a well-traveled route by school children from the northern and eastern sections of the city to the tri-school area to the south, and increased foot traffic from workers in the area. LU-61 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-24.3: BUILDING AND SITE DESIGN Locate buildings along the street with parking areas to the rear. Break up massing of large office buildings along the street with pedestrian- scaled elements and locate building entries and active uses along the street frontage to improve the pedestrian character of the area. POLICY LU-24.4: COMPATIBILITY OF USE The compatibility of non-industrial uses with industrial uses must be considered when reviewing new development. POLICY LU-24.5: NEIGHBORHOOD BUFFERS New industrial uses should provide building transitions, setbacks and landscaping to provide a buffer for adjoining low-intensity residential uses. LU-62 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-25.1: CONCEPTUAL PLAN Continue to govern Monta Vista’s commercial area through the Monta Vista Design Guidelines. The guidelines provide direction for architecture, landscaping and public improvements. Create a Monta Vista Village Conceptual Plan to with a cohesive set of updated regulations and guidelines for this area. POLICY LU-25.2: LAND USE Encourage the commercial district to serve as a neighborhood commercial center for Monta Vista Village and its adjoining neighborhoods. Mixed-use with residential is encouraged. The industrial area should be retained to provide small-scale light industrial and service industrial opportunities, while remaining compatible with the surrounding residential and commercial uses. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. POLICY LU-25.3: BUILDING AND SITE DESIGN Encourage buildings to be designed in a way that promotes the small-scale, older and mixed-use character of the area. Buildings should be located along the street with pedestrian-scale architecture and retail and active uses on the ground floor. Parking should be located to the rear. GOAL LU-25 Retain and enhance Monta Vista Village's small town character as a pedestrian- oriented, small scale, mixed-use residential, neighborhood commercial and industrial area MONTA VISTA VILLAGE The Monta Vista Village Special Area is envisioned to be retained as a small town, pedestrian-oriented mixed-use area within Cupertino. As incremental change occurs, the City will identify opportunities to enhance the areas uses that are consistent with the small town character. LU-63 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) STRATEGIES: LU-25.3.1: Storefront appearance. Commercial and office buildings shall include a storefront appearance to the public street, and shall not be separated from the public sidewalk by extensive landscaping or changes in elevation. Office buildings shall be designed to accommodate future entrances from the sidewalk for future retail uses. LU-25.3.2: Parking. Commercial properties or commercial portions of properties may rely on public parking on Pasadena and Imperial Avenues to meet their off- site parking needs within the area bounded by Granada Avenue, Stevens Creek Boulevard, Orange Avenue and the Union Pacific right-of-way (see diagram to the right). POLICY LU-25.4: STREET DESIGN AND CONNECTIVITY Maintain Monta Vista Village as a walkable, bikeable mixed-use neighborhood with sidewalks, street trees and roadway improvements for bike lanes and sidewalks with routes to the tri-school area. Automobile, pedestrian and bicycle improvements are envisioned along other streets in this area to create an interconnected grid and with new development to remove street blockages and promote a network of streets. On-street parking is encouraged. Roadway and sidewalk improvements will also improve school routes from the northern neighborhoods to the tri- school area. STRATEGIES: LU-25.4.1: Interconnected access. Individual properties shall have interconnected pedestrian and vehicle access and shared parking. LU-25.4.2. Residential streets. Residential street improvements may have a semi-rural appearance based on the Municipal Code requirements. Safe routes to school streets, or any others designated by the City Council shall be required to have sidewalks and street trees. LU-64 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-26 Retain commercial areas adjacent to neighborhoods and retrofit or encourage redevelopment as neighborhood centers in a pedestrian-oriented and bike-friendly environment POLICY LU-26.1: LAND USE Retrofit or redevelop neighborhood centers using the “neighborhood commercial centers” concept discussed earlier in this Element. Areas that are not designated as "neighborhood centers" are encouraged to provide commercial uses with active uses such as entries, lobbies, seating areas or retail along the street. See Figure LU-2 for residential densities and criteria. POLICY LU-26.2: BUILDING AND SITE DESIGN Encourage buildings to be designed in a pedestrian-oriented format. Buildings should be located along the street with pedestrian-scale architecture and retail and active uses on the ground floor. Parking should be located to the sides or rear. Buildings may be one to two stories in height. In some instances where taller heights are allowed, buildings may be three stories in height. OTHER NON-RESIDENTIAL/MIXED-USE SPECIAL AREAS In addition to the major mixed-use corridors described above, other Non- Residential/Mixed-Use Areas are located throughout the city. These include the following: west side of Stevens Canyon Road across from McClellan Road; intersection of Foothill Boulevard and Stevens Creek Boulevard; Homestead Road near Foothill Boulevard; northwest corner of Bollinger Road and Blaney Avenue; and all other non-residential properties not referenced in an identified Special Area. LU-65 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-26.3: STREET DESIGN AND CONNECTIVITY Create neighborhood centers that are walkable, bikeable areas with sidewalks, street trees and roadway improvements for bike lanes and sidewalks to provide connections to the neighborhoods that they serve. POLICY LU-26.4: NEIGHBORHOOD BUFFERS Encourage projects to include building transitions, setbacks and landscaping to provide a buffer for adjoining low- intensity residential uses. LU-66 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-27.1: COMPATIBILITY Ensure that new development within and adjacent to residential neighborhoods is compatible with neighborhood character. STRATEGIES: LU-27.1.1: Regulations. Maintain and update design regulations and guidelines for single- family development that address neighborhood compatibility and visual and privacy impacts. LU-27.1.2: Neighborhood Guidelines. Identify neighborhoods that have a unique architectural style, historical background or location and develop plans that preserve and enhance their character. Support and budget for special zoning or design guidelines (e.g., the Fairgrove Eichler neighborhood) and single-story overlay zones in neighborhoods, where there is strong neighborhood support. GOAL LU-27 Preserve neighborhood character and enhance connectivity to nearby services to create complete neighborhoods NEIGHBORHOODS The City has many neighborhoods, each with its own distinctive character and setting. These neighborhoods play a vital role in supporting Cupertino’s great quality of life. Neighborhood goals and policies help preserve and enhance the quality of life by protecting neighborhood character and improving walking and biking connections to parks, schools and services. Neighborhoods typically offer a variety of housing choices to meet a spectrum of community needs. The following general goal, policies and strategies apply to all neighborhoods in the city. LU-67 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-27.1.3: Flexibility. When neighborhoods are in transition, add flexibility for requirements for new development that acknowledge the transition while continuing to respect the existing neighborhood. LU-27.1.4: Late Night Uses. Discourage late-evening entertainment activities such as night- clubs in commercial areas where parcels are especially narrow, abut single-family residential development, and cannot adequately provide visual and noise buffers. POLICY LU-27.2: RELATIONSHIP TO THE STREET Ensure that new development in and adjacent to neighborhoods improve the walkability of neighborhoods by providing inviting entries, stoops and porches along the street frontage, compatible building design and reducing visual impacts of garages. POLICIES LU-27.3: ENTRIES Define neighborhood entries through architecture, or landscaping appropriate to the character of the neighborhood. Gates are discouraged because they isolate developments from the community. POLICY LU-27.4: CONNECTIONS Support pedestrian and bicycling improvements that improve access with neighborhoods to parks, schools and local retail, and between neighborhoods. Support traffic calming measures rather than blocking the street to reduce traffic impacts on neighborhoods. POLICY LU-27.5: STREETS Determine appropriate street widths, bike lane, sidewalk and streetlight design to define the unique character of neighborhoods, where appropriate. POLICY LU-27.6: MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL DESIGN Maintain an attractive, livable environment for multi-family dwellings. STRATEGIES: LU-27.6.1: Provision of Outdoor Areas. Provide outdoor areas, both passive and active, and generous landscaping to enhance the surroundings for multi-family residents. Allow public access to the common outdoor areas whenever possible LU-27.6.2: Ordinance Updates. Update the Planned Development (residential) and R-3 ordinances to achieve the policies and strategies applicable to multi-family development in neighborhoods. POLICY LU-27.7: COMPATIBILITY OF LOTS Ensure that zoning, subdivision and lot-line adjustment requests related to lot size or lot design consider the need to preserve neighborhood lot patterns. LU-68 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) STRATEGIES: LU-27.7.1: Lot Size. Ensure that subdivision and lot- line adjustment requests respect the neighborhood lot size patterns. Consider revisions to lot size requirements if the neighborhood lot pattern is different from the zoning requirements. LU-27.7.2: Flag Lots. Allow flag lots only in cases where they are the sole alternative to integrate subdivisions with the surrounding neighborhood. POLICY LU-27.8: PROTECTION Protect residential neighborhoods from noise, traffic, light, glare, odors and visually intrusive effects from more intense development with landscape buffers, site and building design, setbacks and other appropriate measures. POLICY LU-27.9: AMENITIES AND SERVICES Improve equitable distribution of community amenities such as parks and access to shopping within walking and bicycling distance of neighborhoods. LU-69 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-28.1: CONNECTIVITY Improve bicycle and pedestrian environment along Foothill Boulevard and Stevens Canyon Road to improve neighborhood connectivity to services as well for hikers and bikers accessing natural open space areas in the vicinity. POLICY LU-28.2: MERRIMAN-SANTA LUCIA NEIGHBORHOOD Allow legal, non-conforming duplexes to remain in the area bounded by Santa Lucia Road, Alcalde Road and Foothill Boulevard. INSPIRATION HEIGHTS NEIGHBORHOOD The Inspiration Heights neighborhood will continue to be a low-intensity and hillside residential area. Future development should consider preservation of hillsides, riparian corridors, and plant and animal wildlife habitat through sensitive site and building design. This area has developments that were annexed from the county. Legal, non-conforming uses and buildings in such areas are granted additional flexibility. GOAL LU-28 Retain Inspiration Heights as a low-intensity residential area in a natural, hillside setting LU-70 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL LU-29 Retain and enhance the Oak Valley as a unique neighborhood surrounded by natural hillside areas and private and public space POLICY LU-29.1: DEVELOPMENT INTENSITY Require development intensity for the single-family Oak Valley neighborhood to be consistent with the development agreement that includes the use permit and other approvals. The development agreement describes development areas, intensity and styles of development, public park dedication, tree protection, access and historic preservation. The theme of the approvals is to balance development with environmental protection by clustering development, setting it back from sensitive environmental areas and preserving large areas as permanent open space. POLICY LU-29.2: DESIGN ELEMENTS Require buildings to reflect the natural hillside setting as required in residential hillside zones with traditional architectural styles and natural materials and colors. Larger building elements should be scaled to respect the existing development in the surrounding area. OAK VALLEY NEIGHBORHOOD LU-71 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY LU-30.1: DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Require all new construction to conform to the R1-e zoning (Single- Family Residential–Eichler). POLICY LU-30.2: DESIGN GUIDELINES Encourage residents to incorporate the design guidelines illustrated in the Eichler Design Guidelines. GOAL LU-30 Preserve the unique character of the Eichler homes in the Fairgrove Neighborhood FAIRGROVE NEIGHBORHOOD LU-72 CHAPTER 4: HOUSING | cupertino community vision 2040 4housing CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-2 Cupertino is a community with a high quality of life, a renowned school system, and a robust high-technology economy. The long term vitality of Cupertino and the local economy depend upon the availability of all types of housing to meet the community’s diverse housing needs. As Cupertino looks towards the future, increasing the range and diversity of housing options will be integral to the City’s success. Consistent with the goal of being a balanced community, this Housing Element continues the City’s commitment to ensuring new opportunities for residential development, as well as for preserving and enhancing our existing neighborhoods. CONTENTS: H-2 Introduction Role and Content of Housing Element H-4 Housing Needs Assessment Demographic Trends in Cupertino Housing Stock Characteristics Income and Market Conditions Related to Housing Costs Special Housing Needs Introduction H-14 Regional Housing Needs and Allocation H-15 Housing Resources H-18 Housing Plan H-19 Quantified Objectives CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) The Housing Element is a comprehensive eight-year plan to address housing needs in Cupertino. This updated Housing Element focuses on housing needs from January 31, 2015 through January 31, 2023, in accordance with the housing element planning period established by State law for San Francisco Bay Area jurisdictions. This Housing Element is the City’s primary policy document regarding the development, rehabilitation, and preservation of housing for all economic segments of the population. Per State Housing Element law, the document must be periodically updated to: • Outline the community’s housing production objectives consistent with State and regional growth projections • Describe goals, policies and implementation strategies to achieve local housing objectives • Examine the local need for housing with a focus on special needs populations • Identify adequate sites for the production of housing serving various income levels • Analyze potential constraints to new housing production • Evaluate the Housing Element for consistency with other General Plan elements This element outlines the community’s projected housing needs and defines the actions the City will take to address them. General Plan Appendix B provides detailed background information to meet all requirements of State Housing Element law. ROLE AND CONTENT OF HOUSING ELEMENT H-3 CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-4 HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT This section describes the demographic, housing, and economic conditions in Cupertino; assesses the demand for housing for households at all income levels; and documents the demand for housing to serve special needs populations. The Housing Needs Assessment establishes the framework for defining the City’s housing goals and formulating policies and strategies that address local housing needs. A community’s population characteristics can affect the amount and type of housing needed. Factors such as population growth, household type, and whether or not households are more likely to rent or buy their homes influence the type of housing needed. DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS IN CUPERTINO AND THE REGION POPULATION The City’s population increased by 15 percent between 2000 and 2010, exceed- ing the growth rate of Santa Clara County (six percent), the San Francisco Bay area (five percent), and the State of California (10 percent) (see Table HE-1). During this period, Cupertino grew from 50,546 to 58,302 residents. A portion of this population growth can be attributed to the annexation of 168 acres of land between 2000 and 2008. Annexation of Garden Gate, Monta Vista, and scattered County “islands” added 1,600 new residents. After removing the population in- creases from these annexations, Cupertino experienced a 12-percent increase in its population during the previous decade. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-5 HOUSEHOLDS A household is defined as a person or group of persons living in a housing unit, as opposed to persons living in group quarters, such as dormitories, convalescent homes, or prisons. In 2010, Cupertino was home to 20,181 households (see Table HE-1). The City added approximately 2,000 new households between 2000 and 2010, an increase of 11 percent. Approximately 600 of these households, however, resulted from annexations. After adjusting for household increases due to annexation, the number of households grew by only eight percent between 2000 and 2010. During the same time period, the number of households increased by 6.8 percent in Santa Clara County. HOUSEHOLD TYPE Households are divided into two different types, depending on their composition. Family households are those consisting of two or more related persons living together. Non-family households include persons who live alone or in groups of unrelated individuals. Cupertino has a large proportion of family households. In 2011, family households comprised 77 percent of all households in the City, compared with 71 percent of Santa Clara County households (see Table HE-1). HOUSEHOLD TENURE Households in Cupertino are more likely to own than rent their homes. Approximately 63 percent of Cupertino households owned their homes in 2010. By comparison, 58 percent of Santa Clara County households owned homes (see Table HE-1). CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-6 LONG-TERM PROJECTIONS Table HE-2 shows population, household, and job growth projections for Cupertino, Santa Clara County, and the nine-county Bay Area region between 2010 and 2040 and represents the analysis conducted by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) using 2010 Census data and a variety of local sources. Between 2010 and 2040, Cupertino’s population is expected to grow by 12,898 residents—from 58,302 to 71,200. This translates into an increase of 22 percent over 30 years. ABAG projects both Santa Clara County and the ABAG region will experience much larger growth over the same time period (36 percent and 31 percent, respectively). Cupertino’s job growth is expected to continue to outpace population and household growth between 2010 and 2020, compounding the “jobs rich” nature of the City and the region. By 2020, Cupertino is anticipated to have a jobs-to-housing ratio of 1.40 (up from 1.29 in 2010, but mirroring the regional average of 1.40). Job growth in Cupertino is projected to level off after 2020 to a comparable pace with population and household growth. Similar trends are also projected for the County and the ABAG region as a whole. HOUSING STOCK CHARACTERISTICS A community’s housing stock is defined as the collection of all types of housing located within the jurisdiction. The characteristics of the housing stock— including condition, type, and affordability—are important in determining the housing needs for Cupertino. DISTRIBUTION OF UNITS BY STRUCTURE TYPE A majority of housing units in Cupertino are single-family detached homes (57 percent in 2013). While still representing the majority house type, this represents a decrease from 2000, when 61 percent of all homes were single-family detached. In comparison, single-family detached homes in both Santa Clara County and the Bay Area comprised 54 percent of all homes in 2013. Large multi-family buildings (defined as units in structures containing five or more dwellings) represent the second largest housing category in Cupertino (21 percent), followed by single-family attached dwellings (12 percent). Between 2000 and 2013, these two housing types experienced an increase of 24 and 26 percent, respectively. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table HE-1: Population and Household Trends, 2000-2010/2011 2000 2010/2011 Total Change 2000-2010 Percent Change 2000-2011 City of Cupertino Population 50,546 58,302 7,756 15.3% Households 18,204 20,181 1,977 10.9% Average Household Size (a)2.75 2.83 Household Type (a) Families 74.8%77.4% Non-Families 25.2%22.6% Tenure Owner 63.6%62.6% Renter 36.4%37.4% Santa Clara County Population 1,682,585 1,781,642 99,057 5.9% Households 565,863 604,204 38,341 6.8% Average Household Size (a)2.92 2.89 Household Type (a) Families 69.9%70.8% Non-Families 30.1%29.2% Tenure Owner 59.8%57.6% Renter 40.2%42.4% Bay Area (b) Population 6,783,760 7,150,739 366,979 5.4% Households 2,466,019 2,608,023 142,004 5.8% Average Household Size (a)2.69 2.69 Household Type (a) Families 64.7%64.8% Non-Families 35.3%35.2% Tenure Owner 57.7%56.2% Renter 42.3%43.8% California Population 33,871,648 37,253,956 3,382,308 10.0% Households 11,502,870 12,577,498 1,074,628 9.3% Average Household Size (a)2.87 2.91 Household Type (a) Families 68.9%68.6% Non-Families 31.1%31.4% Tenure Owner 56.9%55.9% Renter 43.1%44.1% Notes: (a) Average household size and household type figures from American Community Survey (ACS), 2007-2011. (b) Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. Source: Association of Bay area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013 H-7 CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) TABLE HE-2: Population, Household, and Job Projections, 2010-2040 Years Percent Change 2010 2020 2030 2040 2010- 2020 2020- 2030 2030- 2040 City of Cupertino Population 58,302 62,100 66,300 71,200 6.5%6.8%7.4% Households 20,181 21,460 22,750 24,040 6.3%6.0%5.7% Jobs 26,090 29,960 31,220 33,110 14.8%4.2%6.1% Santa Clara County Population 1,781,642 1,977,900 2,188,500 2,423,500 11.0%10.6%10.7% Households 604,204 675,670 747,070 818,400 11.8%10.6%9.5% Jobs 926,270 1,091,270 1,147,020 1,229,520 17.8%5.1%7.2% Bay Area (a) Population 6,432,288 7,011,700 7,660,700 8,394,700 9.0%9.3%9.6% Households 2,350,186 2,560,480 2,776,640 2,992,990 8.9%8.4%7.8% Jobs 3,040,110 3,579,600 3,775,080 4,060,160 17.7%5.5%7.6% Notes: a) Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. H-8 INCOME AND MARKET CONDITIONS RELATED TO HOUSING COSTS The cost of housing is dependent on a variety of factors, including underlying land costs, market characteristics, and financing options. In the Bay Area, the technology boom has increased the demand for new housing at all income levels, resulting in both lower-earning residents and well-paid area professionals competing for housing in an overcrowded and expensive market. High housing costs can price lower-income families out of the market, cause extreme cost burdens, or force households into overcrowded conditions. Cupertino has some of the highest housing costs in the region. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-9 RENTAL MARKET CHARACTERISTICS AND TRENDS A review of rental market conditions in Cupertino was conducted for this Housing Element by reviewing advertised apartment listings. The survey found that market-rate rents averaged: • $1,608 per month for studio units • $2,237 per month for one-bedroom units • $2,886 per month for two-bedroom units • $3,652 per month for three-bedroom units Rental prices in Cupertino ranged from $1,400 for a studio unit to $5,895 for a five-bedroom unit. As can be expected, smaller units are generally more affordable than larger units. The overall median rental price for all unit sizes surveyed was $2,830, and the average price was $2,919. HOME SALE TRENDS While other areas of the State and nation experienced downturns in the housing market during the national recession that began in 2008, Cupertino home values have continued to grow. During the depth of the housing market crash (between 2008 and 2010), the median home price in Cupertino held steady at around $1,000,000. Since 2011, home prices in Cupertino have increased substantially. The 2013 median home sales price of $1,200,000 in Cupertino was nearly double that of the County median price ($645,000), and prices continued to rise in 2014. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-10 HOUSING AFFORDABILITY According to the federal government, housing is considered “affordable” if it costs no more than 30 percent of a household’s gross income. Often, affordable housing is discussed in the context of affordability to households with different income levels. Households are categorized as very low income, low income, moderate income, or above moderate income based on percentages of the area median income established annually by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). In 2014, the area median income for Santa Clara County was $105,500 for a family of four. SPECIAL HOUSING NEEDS Certain groups have more difficulty finding decent, affordable housing due to their special circumstances. Special circumstances may be related to one’s income-earning potential, family characteristics, the presence of physical or mental disabilities, or age-related health issues. As a result, certain groups typically earn lower incomes and have higher rates of overpayment for housing, or they may live in overcrowded residences. Housing Element law specifically requires an analysis of the special housing needs of the elderly, the disabled, female-headed households, large families, farmworkers, and homeless persons and families. Table HE-3 summarizes demographics for these special needs groups in Cupertino. SENIORS Many senior residents face a unique set of housing needs, largely due to physical limitations, fixed incomes, and health care costs. Affordable housing cost, unit sizes and accessibility to transit, family, health care, and other services are critical housing concerns for seniors. In 2010, 20 percent of Cupertino householders were 65 years old or older, slightly higher than the proportion of senior households in Santa Clara County (18.5 percent). A large majority of these senior households owned their homes; 86 percent of elderly households were homeowners, compared to only 58 percent of householders under 64 years old. Cupertino’s elderly renter households are more likely to be lower income than elderly owner households. Approximately 62 percent of elderly renter households earned less than 80 percent of the area median income compared to 42 percent of senior homeowners. Elderly households also tend to pay a larger portion of their income on housing costs than do other households. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-11 Table HE-3: Special Needs Groups in Cupertino Special Needs Group Person or Household Renter Owner Percent of Total Senior-Headed Households 3,983 785 (19.7%)3,198 (80.3%)19.7% Households with a Senior Member 5,069 n/a n/a 25.1% Seniors Living Alone 1,612 516 (32.0%)1,096 (68.0%)8.0% Large Households 1,883 619 (32.9%)1,264 (67.1%)9.3% Single-Parent Households 883 n/a n/a 4.4% Female Single-Parent Households 667 n/a n/a 6.9% Persons with Disabilities (a)3,445 n/a n/a 5.9% Agricultural Workers (b)36 n/a n/a <1% Persons living in Poverty (b)2,330 n/a n/a 4.0% Homeless (c)112 n/a n/a <1% Notes: (a) 2010 Census data not available for persons with disabilities. Estimate is from the 2008-2012 ACS. Estimate is for persons 5 years of age and older. (b) 2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from the 2007-2011 ACS. (c) 2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Point-In-Time Census and Survey Comprehensive Report. Of the 112 homeless persons counted in Cupertino in 2013, 92 persons were unsheltered and 20 were sheltered. Sources: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013; U.S. Census, American Community Survey (ACS), 2008-2012; 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Point-In-Time Census and Survey Comprehensive Report CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-12 LARGE HOUSEHOLDS Large households are defined as those with five or more members. Large households are identified as a special needs group because of limited opportunities for adequately sized and affordable housing. Cupertino has a smaller proportion of large households than Santa Clara County as a whole (9.3 percent in Cupertino compared to 15 percent in Santa Clara County). In the City, large households are more likely to be homeowners (67 percent) than renters (33 percent). Approximately 64 percent of the housing units in Cupertino have three or more bedrooms and can accommodate large households. SINGLE-PARENT HOUSEHOLDS Single-parent households often require special consideration and assistance because of their greater need for affordable housing and accessible day care, health care, and other supportive services. Female-headed single-parent households with children, in particular, tend to have a higher need for affordable housing than other family households in general. In addition, these households are more likely to need childcare since the mother is often the sole source of income in addition to being the sole caregiver for the children in the household. In 2010, 667 female-headed single-parent households with children under 18 years of age lived in Cupertino, representing 3.3 percent of all households in the City. A significant proportion of these households were living in poverty (21 percent). PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES A disability is a physical or mental impairment that limits one or more major life activities. Persons with disabilities generally have lower incomes and often face barriers to finding employment or adequate housing due to physical or structural obstacles. This segment of the population often needs affordable housing that is located near public transportation, services, and shopping. Persons with disabilities may require units equipped with wheelchair accessibility or other special features that accommodate physical or sensory limitations. Depending on the severity of the disability, people may live independently with some assistance in their own homes, or may require assisted living and supportive services in special care facilities. Approximately six percent of Cupertino residents and eight percent of Santa Clara County residents had one or more disabilities in 2010. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-13 RESIDENTS LIVING BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL Families with incomes below the poverty level, specifically those with extremely low and very low incomes, are at the greatest risk of becoming homeless and often require assistance in meeting their rent and mortgage obligations in order to prevent homelessness. Census data suggest that four percent of all Cupertino residents were living below the poverty level in 2010. Specifically, about three percent of family households and two percent of families with children were living below the poverty level. These households may require specific housing solutions such as deeper income targeting for subsidies, housing with supportive services, single-room occupancy units, or rent subsidies and vouchers. HOMELESS Demand for emergency and transitional shelter in Cupertino is difficult to determine given the episodic nature of homelessness. Generally, episodes of homelessness among families or individuals can occur as a single event or periodically. The county-wide 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Census & Survey reported a point-in-time count of 7,631 homeless people on the streets and in emergency shelters, transitional housing, and domestic violence shelters throughout the County. This estimate includes 112 homeless individuals in Cupertino. The count, however, should be considered conservative because many unsheltered homeless individuals may not be visible at street locations, even with the most thorough methodology. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-14 PROGRESS TOWARD THE REGIONAL HOUSING NEEDS ALLOCATION The City of Cupertino may count housing units constructed, approved, or proposed since January 1, 2014 toward satisfying its RHNA goals for this planning period. Between January 1 and May 31, 2014, building permits for 14 single-family housing units and three second units were approved in Cupertino. In addition, six single-family homes and seven apartments received Planning approvals. Also included in the RHNA credits are 32 second units projected to be developed within the planning period. This projection is based on historical approvals of second units during the past Housing Element planning period. With these credits, the City has a remaining RHNA of 1,002 units: 356 extremely low/ very low-income units, 207 low-income units, 196 moderate-income units, and 243 above moderate-income units. Table HE-4: RHNA, Cupertino, 2014-2022 Income Category Projected Need Percent of Total Extremely Low/Very Low (0-50% of AMI)356 33.5% Low (51-80% of AMI)207 19.5% Moderate (81-120% of AMI)231 21.7% Above Moderate (over 120% AMI)270 25.4% Total Units 1,064 100.0% Source: ABAG Regional Housing Needs Assessment, 2014. REGIONAL HOUSING NEEDS ALLOCATION Pursuant to California Government Code Section 65584, the State, regional councils of government (in this case, ABAG), and local governments must collectively determine each locality’s share of regional housing need allocation (RHNA). In conjunction with the State mandated housing element update cycle that requires Bay Area jurisdictions to update their elements by January 31, 2015, ABAG has determined housing unit production needs for each jurisdiction within the Bay Area. These allocations set housing production goals for the planning period that runs from January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022 (Table HE-4). CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-15 HOUSING RESOURCES OVERVIEW OF AVAILABLE SITES FOR HOUSING The purpose of the adequate sites analysis is to demonstrate that a sufficient supply of land exists in the City to accommodate the fair share of the region’s housing needs during the RHNA projections period (January 1, 2014 – October 31, 2022). The Government Code requires that the Housing Element include an “inventory of land suitable for residential development, including vacant sites and sites having the potential for redevelopment”((Section 65583[a][3]). It further requires that the Element analyze zoning and infrastructure on these sites to ensure housing development is feasible during the planning period. Figure HE-1 indicates the available residential development opportunity sites to meet and exceed the identified regional housing need pursuant to the RHNA. The opportunity sites can accommodate infill development of up to 1,400 residential units on properties zoned for densities of 20 dwelling units to the acre or more. The potential sites inventory is organized by geographic area and in particular, by mixed use corridors. As shown in Table HE-5, sites identified to meet the near-term development potential lie within the North Vallco Park Special Area, the Heart of the City Special Area, and the Vallco Shopping District Special Area. One particular site will involve substantial coordination for redevelopment (Vallco Shopping District, Site A2). Due to the magnitude of the project, the City has established a contingency plan to meet the RHNA if a Specific Plan is not approved within three years of Housing Element adoption. This contingency plan (called Scenario B and discussed further in General Plan Appendix B), would involve the City removing Vallco Shopping District, adding more priority sites to the inventory, and also increasing the density/allowable units on other priority sites. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-16 North Vallco Park: 600 Units Heart of the City: 411 Units Vallco Shopping District: 389 Units FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos A3: Oaks 200 units A5: Vacant 11 units A1: Hamptons 600 units A2: Vallco 389 units A4: Marina 200 units 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Special Areas Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas North Vallco Park Heart of the City Housing Elements Sites VTA Priority Development Area (PDA) Site units Site Number: Realistic Capacity. Note: Realistic capacity is generally 85% of maximum capacity allowed Vallco Shopping District Priority Housing Element Sites: Scenario A Applicable if Vallco Specific Plan is adopted by May 31, 2018 If Vallco Specific Plan is not adopted by May 31, 2018, the designated Priority Housing Element Sites will be as shown in General Plan Appendix B, Section 5.5: Residential Sites Inventory - Scenario B. LU-1 FIGURE HE-1 HOUSING ELEMENT: SITES TO MEET THE RHNA CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-17 Table HE-5: Summary of PRIORITY HOUSING ELEMENT SITES To Meet the RHNA - Scenario A Site Adopted General Plan/ Adopted Zoning Special Area Max Density (DUA) Max Height Realistic Capacity (units) Site A1 (The Hamptons)High Density P(Res) North Vallco Park 85 75 ft; or 60 ft in certain locations*;600 net Site A2 (Vallco Shopping District)RS/O/R P(Regional Shopping) & P(CG) Vallco Shopping District 35 height to be determined in Vallco Shopping District Specific Plan 389 Site A3 (The Oaks Shopping Center) C/R P(CG, Res) Heart of the City 30 45 ft 200 Site A4 (Marina Plaza)C/O/R P(CG, Res) Heart of the City 35 45 ft 200 Site A5 (Barry Swenson)C/O/R P(CG, Res) Heart of the City 25 45 ft 11 Total 1,400 Notes: Zoning for Site A2 (Vallco) will be determined by Specific Plan to allow residential uses. Site A1 (Hamptons) height limit of 60 feet is applicable for buildings located within 50 feet of property lines abutting Wolfe Rd, Pruneridge Ave. & Apple Campus 2 site. Site A2 (Vallco) height will be determined by Specific Plan. For more detail on height limits, see Land Use and Community Design Element, Figure LU-2. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-18 HOUSING PLAN This section presents the quantified objectives for new housing unit construction, conservation, and rehabilitation during the 2014-2022 projections period, as well as the policies and strategies to meet these objectives and address local housing needs. Policies and strategies are grouped into the following goals: • Goal HE-1: An Adequate Supply of Residential Units for all Economic Segments • Goal HE-2: Housing that is Affordable for a Diversity of Cupertino Households • Goal HE-3: Enhanced Residential Neighborhoods • Goal HE-4: Energy and Water Conservation • Goal HE-5: Services for Extremely Low-Income Households and Special Needs Neighborhoods • Goal HE-6: Equal Access to Housing Opportunities • Goal HE-7: Coordination with Regional Organizations and Local School Districts This section also identifies the responsible party and timeline for each implementation strategy. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-19 Table HE-6: Quantified Objectives Income Category New Construction (RHNA) Rehabilitation Conservation Extremely Low 178 10 8 Very Low 178 10 - Low 207 20 - Moderate 231 -- Above Moderate 270 -- Total 1,064 40 8 Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 QUANTIFIED OBJECTIVES Table HE-6 outlines the proposed housing production, rehabilitation, and conservation objectives for the eight-year Housing Element planning period. CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-20 GOAL HE-1 An adequate supply of residential units for all economic segments POLICY HE-1.1: PROVISION OF ADEQUATE CAPACITY FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION NEED Designate sufficient land at appropriate densities to accommodate Cupertino’s Regional Housing Needs Allocation of 1,064 units for the 2014- 2022 planning period. POLICY HE-1.2: HOUSING DENSITIES Provide a full range of densities for ownership and rental housing. POLICY HE-1.3: MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT Encourage mixed-use development near transportation facilities and employment centers. STRATEGIES: HE-1.3.1: Land Use Policy and Zoning Provisions. To accommodate the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA), the City will continue to: • Provide adequate capacity through the Land Use Element and Zoning Ordinance to accommodate the RHNA of 1,064 units while maintaining a balanced land use plan that offers opportunities for employment growth, commercial/retail activities, services, and amenities. • Monitor development standards to ensure they are adequate and appropriate to facilitate a range of housing in the community. • Monitor the sites inventory and make it available on the City website. • Monitor development activity on the Housing Opportunity Sites to ensure that the City maintains sufficient land to accommodate the RHNA during the planning period. In the event a housing site listed in the Housing Element sites inventory is redeveloped with PROVISION OF NEW HOUSING CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-21 a non-residential use or at a lower density than shown in the Housing Element sites inventory, ensure that the City has adequate capacity to meet the RHNA by making the findings required by Government Code Section 65863 and identifying alternative site(s) within the City if needed. Priority Housing Sites: As part of the Housing Element update, the City has identified five priority sites under Scenario A (see Table HE-5) for residential development over the next eight years. The General Plan and zoning designations allow the densities shown in Table HE-5 for all sites except the Vallco Shopping District site (Site A2). The redevelopment of Vallco Shopping District will involve significant planning and community input. A specific plan will be required to implement a comprehensive strategy for a retail/office/residential mixed use development. The project applicant would be required to work closely with the community and the City to bring forth a specific plan that meets the community’s needs, with the anticipated adoption and rezoning to occur within three years of the adoption of the 2014-2022 Housing Element (by May 31, 2018). The specific plan would permit 389 units by right at a minimum density of 20 units per acre. If the specific plan and rezoning are not adopted within three years of Housing Element adoption (by May 31, 2018), the City will schedule hearings consistent with Government Code Section 65863 to consider removing Vallco as a priority housing site under Scenario A, to be replaced by sites identified in Scenario B (see detailed discussion and sites listing of “Scenario B” in Appendix B - Housing Element Technical Appendix). As part of the adoption of Scenario B, the City intends to add two additional sites to the inventory: Glenbrook Apartments and Homestead Lanes, along with increased number of permitted units on The Hamptons and The Oaks sites. Applicable zoning is in place for Glenbrook Apartments; however the Homestead Lanes site would need to be rezoned at that time to permit residential uses. Any rezoning required will allow residential uses by right at a minimum density of 20 units per acre. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing; Adopt Specific Plan and rezoning for Vallco by May 31, 2018; otherwise, conduct public hearings to consider adoption of “Scenario B” of sites strategy. Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives 1064 units (178 extremely low-, 178 very low-, 207 low-, 231 moderate- and 270 above moderate- income units) CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-22 HE-1.3.2: Second Dwelling Units. The City will continue to implement the Second Dwelling Unit Ordinance and encourage the production of second units. HE-1.3.3: Lot Consolidation. To facilitate residential and mixed use developments, the City will continue to: • Encourage lot consolidation when contiguous smaller, underutilized parcels are to be redeveloped. • Encourage master plans for such sites with coordinated access and circulation. • Provide technical assistance to property owners of adjacent parcels to facilitate coordinated redevelopment where appropriate. • Encourage intra- and inter- agency cooperation in working with applicants at no cost prior to application submittal for assistance with preliminary plan review. HE-1.3.4: Flexible Development Standards. The City recognizes the need to encourage a range of housing options in the community. The City will continue to: • Offer flexible residential development standards in planned residential zoning districts, such as smaller lot sizes, lot widths, floor area ratios and setbacks, particularly for higher density and attached housing developments. • Consider granting reductions in off-street parking on a case-by- case basis for senior housing. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives Four second units annually for a total of 32 units over eight years Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-23 HE-1.3.5: Heart of the City Specific Plan. To reduce constraints to housing development, and in order to ensure that the designated sites can obtain the realistic capacity shown in the Housing Element, the City will review revisions to the Heart of the City Specific Plan residential density calculation requirement, to eliminate the requirement to net the non- residential portion of the development from the lot area. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-24 GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of CupertinoGOAL HE-2 Housing is affordable for a diversity of Cupertino households POLICY HE-2.1: HOUSING MITIGATION Ensure that all new developments— including market-rate residential developments—help mitigate project- related impact on affordable housing needs. POLICY HE-2.2: RANGE OF HOUSING TYPES Encourage the development of diverse housing stock that provides a range of housing types (including smaller, moderate cost housing) and affordability levels. Emphasize the provision of housing for lower- and moderate-income households including wage earners who provide essential public services (e.g., school district employees, municipal and public safety employees, etc.). POLICY HE-2.3: DEVELOPMENT OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS Maintain and/or adopt appropriate land use regulations and other development tools to encourage the development of affordable housing. Make every reasonable effort to disperse units throughout the community but not at the expense of undermining the fundamental goal of providing affordable units. STRATEGIES: HE-2.3.1: Office and Industrial Housing Mitigation Program. The City will continue to implement the Office and Industrial Housing Mitigation Program. This program requires that developers of office, commercial, and industrial space pay a mitigation fee, which will then be used to support affordable housing in HOUSING AFFORDABILITY CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-25 the City of Cupertino. These mitigation fees are collected and deposited in the City’s Below Market-Rate Affordable Housing Fund (BMR AHF). HE-2.3.2: Residential Housing Mitigation Program. The City will continue to implement the Residential Housing Mitigation Program to mitigate the need for affordable housing created by new market-rate residential development. This program applies to new residential development. Mitigation includes either the payment of the “Housing Mitigation” fee or the provision of a Below Market-Rate (BMR) unit or units. Projects of seven or more for-sale units must provide on-site BMR units. Projects of six units or fewer for-sale units can either build one BMR unit or pay the Housing Mitigation fee. Developers of market- rate rental units, where the units cannot be sold individually, must pay the Housing Mitigation fee to the BMR AHF. The BMR program specifies the following: • Priority. To the extent permitted by law, priority for occupancy is given to Cupertino residents, Cupertino full-time employees and Cupertino public service employees as defined in Cupertino’s Residential Housing Mitigation Manual. • For-Sale Residential Developments. Require 15% for- sale BMR units in all residential developments where the units can be sold individually (including single-family homes, common interest developments, and condominium conversions or allow rental BMR units as allowed in (d) below). • Rental Residential Developments: To the extent permitted by law, require 15% rental very low and low- income BMR units in all rental residential developments. If the City is not permitted by law to require BMR units in rental residential developments, require payment of the Housing Mitigation Fee. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources BHR AHF Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-26 • Rental Alternative. Allow rental BMR units in for-sale residential developments, and allow developers of market-rate rental developments to provide on-site rental BMR units, if the developer: 1) enters into an agreement limiting rents in exchange for a financial contribution or a type of assistance specified in density bonus law (which includes a variety of regulatory relief); and 2) provides very low-income and low-income BMR rental units. • Affordable Prices and Rents. Establish guidelines for affordable sales prices and affordable rents for new affordable housing and update the guidelines each year as new income guidelines are received; • Development of BMR Units Off Site. Allow developers to meet all or a portion of their BMR or Housing Mitigation fee requirement by making land available for the City or a nonprofit housing developer to construct affordable housing, or allow developers to construct the required BMR units off site, in partnership with a nonprofit. The criteria for land donation or off-site BMR units (or combination of the two options) will be identified in the Residential Housing Mitigation Manual. • BMR Term. Require BMR units to remain affordable for a minimum of 99 years; and enforce the City’s first right of refusal for BMR units and other means to ensure that BMR units remain affordable. HE-2.3.3: Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF). The City’s BMR AHF will continue to support affordable housing projects, strategies and services, including but not limited to: • BMR Program Administration • Substantial rehabilitation • Land acquisition • Acquisition of buildings for permanent affordability, with or without rehabilitation Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources BHR AHF Quantified Objectives 20 BMR units over eight years CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-27 • New construction • Preserving “at-risk” BMR units • Rental operating subsidies • Down payment assistance • Land write-downs • Direct gap financing • Fair housing The City will target a portion of the BMR AHF to benefit extremely low- income households and persons with special needs (such as the elderly, victims of domestic violence, and the disabled, including persons with developmental disabilities), to the extent that these target populations are found to be consistent with the needs identified in the nexus study the City prepares to identify the connection, or “nexus” between new developments and the need for affordable housing. To ensure the mitigation fees continue to be adequate to mitigate the impacts of new development on affordable housing needs, the City will update its Nexus Study for the Housing Mitigation Plan by the end of 2015. HE-2.3.4: Housing Resources. Cupertino residents and developers interested in providing affordable housing in the City have access to a variety of resources administered by other agencies. The City will continue to provide information on housing resources and services offered by the County and other outside agencies. These include, but are not limited to: • Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC) – Santa Clara County Housing and Community Development Department. • First-Time Homebuyer Assistance and Developer Loans for Multi-Family Development - Housing Trust Silicon Valley (HTSV). • Housing Choice Vouchers (Section 8) - Housing Authority of Santa Clara County (HASCC). • Affordable housing development Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing/annually publish RFPs to solicit projects; update Nexus Study by the end of 2015 Funding Sources BHR AHF Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-28 - Santa Clara County HOME Consortium. The City will also continue to explore and pursue various affordable housing resources available at the local, regional, state, and federal levels that could be used to address housing needs in the community. HE-2.3.5: Surplus Properties for Housing. The City will explore opportunities on surplus properties as follows: • Work with local public agencies, school districts and churches, to identify surplus properties or underutilized properties that have the potential for residential development. • Encourage long-term land leases of properties from churches, school districts, and corporations for construction of affordable units. • Evaluate the feasibility of developing special housing for teachers or other employee groups on the surplus properties. Research other jurisdictions’ housing programs for teachers for their potential applicability in Cupertino. HE-2.3.6: Incentives for Affordable Housing Development. The City will continue to offer a range of incentives to facilitate the development of affordable housing. These include: • Financial assistance through the City’s Below Market-Rate Affordable Housing Fund (BMR AHF) and CDBG funds. • Partner with CDBG and/or support the funding application of qualified affordable housing developers for regional, state, and federal affordable housing Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing; evaluate housing programs for teachers in 2015 Funding Sources BHR AHF Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-29 funds, including HOME funds, Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), and mortgage revenue bonds. • Density bonus incentives (see Strategy HE-2.3.7). • Flexible development standards • Technical assistance. • Waiver of park dedication fees and construction tax. • Parking ordinance waivers. • Expedited permit processing. The City joined the Santa Clara County HOME Consortium so that HOME funds for eligible affordable housing projects within the City of Cupertino are available beginning federal fiscal year 2015. HE-2.3.7: Density Bonus Ordinance. The City will encourage use of density bonuses and incentives, as applicable, for housing developments which include one of the following: • At least 5 percent of the housing units are restricted to very low income residents. • At least 10 percent of the housing units are restricted to lower income residents. • At least 10 percent of the housing units in a for-sale common interest development are restricted to moderate income residents. • The project donates at least one acre of land to the city or county large enough for 40 very low income units; the land has the appropriate general plan designation, zoning, permits, approvals, and access to public facilities needed for such housing; funding has been identified; and other requirements are met. A density bonus of up to 20 percent must be granted to projects that contain one of the following: • The project is a senior citizen housing development (no affordable units required). • The project is a mobile home park age restricted to senior citizens (no affordable units required). Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing incentives (annually publish RFPs to solicit projects); joined HOME Consortium in 2014 Funding Sources BMR AHF; CDBG; HOME; General Fund Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-30 For projects that contain on-site affordable housing, developers may request one to three regulatory concessions, which must result in identifiable cost reductions and be needed to make the housing affordable. The City will update the density bonus ordinance as necessary to respond to future changes in State law. HE-2.3.8: Extremely Low-Income Housing and Housing for Persons with Special Needs. The City will continue to encourage the development of adequate housing to meet the needs of extremely low- income households and persons with special needs (such as the elderly, victims of domestic violence, and the disabled, including persons with developmental disabilities). Specifically, the City will consider the following incentives: • Provide financing assistance using the Below Market-Rate Affordable Housing Fund (BMR AHF) and Community Development Block Grant funds (CDBG). • Allow residential developments to exceed planned density maximums if they provide special needs housing and the increase in density will not overburden neighborhood streets or hurt neighborhood character. • Grant reductions in off-street parking on a case-by-case basis. • Partner with and/or support the funding application of qualified affordable housing developers for regional, state, and federal affordable housing funds, including HOME funds, Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), and mortgage revenue bond. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required. Quantified Objectives N/A Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources BMR AHF; CDBG; HOME Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-31 HE-2.3.9: Employee Housing. The City permits employee housing in multiple zoning districts. Pursuant to the State Employee Housing Act, any employee housing consisting of no more than 36 beds in a group quarters or 12 units or spaces designed for use by a single family or household shall be deemed an agricultural land use. No conditional use permit, zoning variance, or other zoning clearance shall be required of this employee housing that is not required of any other agricultural activity in the same zone. The permitted occupancy in employee housing in a zone allowing agricultural uses shall include agricultural employees who do not work on the property where the employee housing is located. The Employee Housing Act also specifies that housing for six or fewer employees be treated as a residential use. The City amended the Zoning Ordinance to be consistent with the State law in 2014 and will continue to comply with the Employee Housing Act where it would apply. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-32 POLICY HE-3.1: HOUSING REHABILITATION Pursue and/or provide funding for the acquisition/rehabilitation of housing that is affordable to very low-, low-, and moderate-income households. Actively support and assist non-profit and for-profit developers in producing affordable units. POLICY HE-3.2: MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR Assist lower-income homeowners and rental property owners in maintaining and repairing their housing units. POLICY HE-3.3: CONSERVATION OF HOUSING STOCK The City’s existing multi-family units provide opportunities for households of varied income levels. Preserve existing multi-family housing stock by preventing the net loss of multi-family housing units in new development and the existing inventory of affordable housing units that are at risk of converting to market-rate housing. STRATEGIES: HE-3.3.1: Residential Rehabilitation. The City will continue to: • Utilize its Below Market-Rate Affordable Housing Fund (BMR AHF) and Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds to support residential rehabilitation efforts in the community. These include: • Acquisition/rehabilitation of rental housing. • Rehabilitation of owner- occupied housing. • Provide assistance for home safety repairs and mobility/ accessibility improvements to income-qualified owner- occupants using CDBG funds. The focus of this strategy is on the correction of safety hazards. GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of CupertinoGOAL HE-3 Stable and physically sound residential neighborhoods MAINTAINING EXISTING HOUSING STOCK CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-33 • Partner with and/or support the funding application of qualified affordable housing developers for regional, state, and federal affordable housing funds, including HOME funds, Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), and mortgage revenue bonds. HE-3.3.2: Preservation of At-Risk Housing Units. One housing project – Beardon Drive (eight units) – is considered at risk of converting to market-rate housing during the next ten years. The City will proactively contact the property owner regarding its intent to remain or opt out of the affordable program. In the event the project becomes at risk of converting to market-rate housing, the City will work with the property owner or other interested nonprofit housing providers to preserve the units. The City will also conduct outreach to the tenants to provide information on any potential conversion and available affordable housing assistance programs. The City will continue to monitor its entire portfolio of affordable housing for-sale and rental inventory annually. The City will monitor its affordable for-sale inventory by requiring Below Market-Rate (BMR) homeowners to submit proof of occupancy such as utility bills, mortgage loan documentation, homeowner’s insurance, and property tax bills. The City will further monitor its affordable for-sale inventory by ordering title company lot books, reviewing property profile reports and updating its public database annually. The City will monitor its affordable rental inventory by verifying proof of occupancy and performing annual rental income certifications for each BMR tenant. The City records a Resale Restriction Agreement against each affordable Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Housing Division; West Valley Community Services Time Frame Ongoing/annually publish RFPs to solicit projects Funding Sources BMR AHF; CDBG; HOME Quantified Objectives Rehabilitate five units per year for a total of 40 units over eight years CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-34 BMR for-sale unit and a Regulatory Agreement for BMR rental units to help ensure long-term affordability. To help further preserve the City’s affordable housing stock, the City may consider providing assistance to rehabilitate and upgrade the affordable units as well. HE-3.3.3: Condominium Conversion. The existing Condominium Conversion Ordinance regulates the conversion of rental units in multi-family housing development in order to preserve the rental housing stock. Condominium conversions are not allowed if the rental vacancy rate in Cupertino and certain adjacent areas is less than five percent at the time of the application for conversion and has averaged five percent over the past six months. The City will continue to monitor the effectiveness of this ordinance in providing opportunities for homeownership while preserving a balanced housing stock with rental housing. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Housing Division Time Frame Annually monitor status of affordable projects; contact property owner of at risk project at least one year in advance of potential conversion date. Funding Sources BMR AHF; CDBG; HOME Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-35 HE-3.3.4: Housing Preservation Program. When a proposed development or redevelopment of a site would cause a loss of multi-family housing, the City will grant approval only if: • The project will comply with the City’s Below Market-Rate Program; • The number of units provided on the site is at least equal to the number of existing units; and • Adverse impacts on displaced tenants, in developments with more than four units, are mitigated. In addition, indirect displacement may be caused by factors such as increased market rents as areas become more desirable. The City will participate, as appropriate, in studies of regional housing need and displacement, and consider policies or programs to address the indirect displacement of lower income residents as appropriate. HE-3.3.5 Neighborhood and Community Clean-Up Campaigns. The City will continue to encourage and sponsor neighborhood and community clean-up campaigns for both public and private properties. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources General Funds Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-36 POLICY HE-4.1: ENERGY AND WATER CONSERVATION Encourage energy and water conservation in all existing and new residential development. STRATEGIES: HE-4.1.1: Enforcement of Title 24. The City will continue to enforce Title 24 requirements for energy conservation and will evaluate utilizing some of the other suggestions as identified in the Environmental Resources/ Sustainability element.GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of CupertinoGOAL HE-4 Energy and water conservation Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development Department/Building Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A SUSTAINABLE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-37 HE-4.1.2: Sustainable Practices. The City will continue to implement the Landscape Ordinance for water conservation and the Green Building Ordinance (adopted in 2013) that applies primarily to new residential and nonresidential development, additions, renovations, and tenant improvements of ten or more units. To further the objectives of the Green Building Ordinance, the City will evaluate the potential to provide incentives, such as waiving or reducing fees, for energy conservation improvements at affordable housing projects (existing or new) with fewer than ten units to exceed the minimum requirements of the California Green Building Code. This City will also implement the policies in its climate action plan to achieve residential-focused greenhouse gas emission reductions and further these community energy and water conservation goals. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division and Building Division Time Frame Ongoing; consider further incentives in 2015 to encourage green building practices in smaller developments Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-38 POLICY HE-5.1: LOWER-INCOME AND SPECIAL NEEDS HOUSEHOLDS Support organizations that provide services to lower-income households and special need households in the City, such as the homeless, elderly, disabled and single parent households. STRATEGIES: HE-5.1.1: Emergency Shelters. The City will continue to facilitate housing opportunities for special needs persons by allowing emergency shelters as a permitted use in the “BQ” Quasi-Public zoning district. The City will subject emergency shelters to the same development standards as other similar uses within the BQ zoning district, except for those provisions permitted by State law and provided in the Zoning Ordinance for emergency shelters. GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of CupertinoGOAL HE-5 Special services for lower-income and special needs households Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Planning Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A LOWER INCOME AND SPECIAL NEEDS HOUSING CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-39 HE-5.1.2: Supportive Services for Lower-Income Households and Persons with Special Needs. The City will continue to utilize its Below Market-Rate Affordable Housing Fund, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, and General Fund Human Service Grants (HSG) funds to provide for a range of supportive services for lower-income households and persons with special needs. HE-5.1.3: Rotating Homeless Shelter. The City will continue to support the operation of a Rotating Homeless Shelter program. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Housing Division Time Frame Annually through the Action Plan funding application process allocate CDBG and HSG to organizations that cater to the needs of lower income and special needs households Funding Sources BMR AHF; CDBG; HSG Quantified Objectives N/A Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Housing Division; Faith in Action Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None required Quantified Objectives N/A CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-40 GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of CupertinoGOAL HE-6 Equal access to housing opportunities POLICY HE-6.1: HOUSING DISCRIMINATION The City will work to eliminate on a citywide basis all unlawful discrimination in housing with respect to age, race, sex, sexual orientation, marital or familial status, ethnic background, medical condition, or other arbitrary factors, so that all persons can obtain decent housing. STRATEGY: HE-6.1.1: Fair Housing Services. The City will continue to: • Provide fair housing services, which include outreach, education, counseling, and investigation of fair housing complaints. • Retain a fair housing service provider to provide direct services for residents, landlords, and other housing professionals. • Coordinate with efforts of the Santa Clara County Fair Housing Consortium to affirmatively further fair housing. • Distribute fair housing materials produced by various organizations at public counters and public events. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development/ Housing Division; Santa Clara County Fair Housing Consortium; Eden Council for Hope and Opportunity (ECHO) Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources BMR AHF; CCDBG Quantified Objectives N/A FAIR HOUSING PRACTICES CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-41 POLICY HE-7.1: COORDINATION WITH LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS The Cupertino community places a high value on the excellent quality of education provided by the three public school districts which serve residents. To ensure the long-term sustainability of the schools in tandem with the preservation and development of vibrant residential areas, the City will continue to coordinate with the Cupertino Union School District (CUSD), Fremont Union High School District (FUHSD), and Santa Clara Unified School District (SCUSD). POLICY HE-7.2: COORDINATION WITH REGIONAL EFFORTS TO ADDRESS HOUSING-RELATED ISSUES Coordinate efforts with regional organizations, including ABAG and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), as well as neighboring jurisdictions, to address housing and related quality of life issues (such as air quality and transportation). POLICY HE-7.3: PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS Promote public-private partnerships to address housing needs in the community, especially housing for the workforce. STRATEGY: HE-7.3.1: Coordination with Outside Agencies and Organizations. The City recognizes the importance of partnering with outside agencies and organizations in addressing local and regional housing issues. These may include, but are not limited to, the following: • School districts • Housing providers • Neighboring jurisdictions GOAL HE-7 Coordination with regional organizations and local school districts MAINTAINING EXISTING HOUSING STOCK CHAPTER 4: HOUSING ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) H-42 • Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) • Air Quality Management District • Housing Trust Silicon Valley • Santa Clara County Fair Housing Consortium • Santa Clara County HOME Consortium • Santa Clara County Continuum of Care (COC) • Housing Authority of Santa Clara County (HASCC) • Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) Specifically, the City will meet with these agencies/organizations periodically to discuss the changing needs, development trends, alternative approaches, and partnering opportunities. Responsible Agencies Cupertino Department of Community Development Planning Division and Housing Division Time Frame Ongoing Funding Sources None Required Quantified Objectives N/A mobility 5 1 Cupertino’s transportation system is multi-faceted. It integrates walkways, sidewalks, bicycle routes, bus transit facilities, local streets, major roadways and freeways into a single, integrated system that supports the city’s high quality of life. At the local level, this includes facilities that connect neighborhoods with pedestrian, bicycle and automobile routes. Longer distance connections include links to major boulevards, expressways, commuter rail and the regional freeway system. This Element includes goals, policies and strategies that the City will use in making decisions regarding transportation network improvements needed to accommodate Cupertino’s anticipated growth. The purpose for this Element is to implement strategies that make alternative modes of transportation attractive choices. This will help reduce strain on the automobile network and improve health and quality of life for Cupertino residents and businesses. Introduction M-2 Introduction M-3 Context Regional Transportation Planning Link between Land Use and Transportation Complete Streets Greenhouse Gases and Transportation Pedestrians and Bicyclists Performance Measurement Transportation Network M-12 Looking Forward M-13 Goals and Policies Regional Coordination Complete Streets Walkability and Bikeability Transit Safe Routes to Schools Vehicle Parking Transportation Impact Analysis Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Air Quality Roadway System Efficiency Transportation Infrastructure CONTENTS: CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Cupertino’s circulation system was developed mostly in a suburban and auto- oriented pattern during the 1950s and 1960s. Over the years, the City has enhanced its roadway infrastructure with a system of bike lanes, trails, bridges, better sidewalks and publicly accessible connections in new development. Cupertino is also served by many important regional transportation facilities such as Highway 85, Interstate 280, Lawrence Expressway, and bus transit service provided by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA). The community anticipates reductions in auto traffic impacts, enhancements to the walking and biking environment, improvements to existing transit service, and connections to key transit nodes including Caltrain. As such, the goals in this Element respond to current conditions and present policies to adequately address future change. REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING Cupertino’s local transportation infrastructure is supplemented by regional facilities and services through agencies such as the VTA, the local congestion- management agency, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the Bay Area’s regional transportation authority, and Caltrans, the State Department of Transportation. Each agency has a long-term plan consisting of policies and projects which are connected to the operational success of Cupertino’s local transportation network. Key projects for these agencies include: • Interchange Improvements at Interstate 280/Highway 85 (MTC–Plan Bay Area) • Stevens Creek Bus Rapid Transit (MTC–Plan Bay Area) Regional transit service primarily includes bus lines operated by VTA that run along the city’s major corridors, including Stevens Creek Boulevard, De Anza Boulevard and Wolfe Road, and portions of Homestead Road, Stelling Road and Tantau Avenue. Regional facilities include a bus transit station at De Anza College and within the Vallco Shopping District. As new development projects are proposed, the City will continue to identify opportunities for improvements to bus stop facilities, such as the new Apple Campus 2 area at Wolfe Road, Homestead Road and Tantau Avenue and the Main Street project at Tantau Avenue and Stevens Creek Boulevard. M-3 CONTEXT CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-4 A relatively new trend in regional commute transportation is the implementation of private bus and shuttle services to connect workers and major employers throughout the Bay Area. While currently this activity is not regulated or organized among these employers, it is beneficial in the regional effort to reduce the reliance on Single Occupancy Vehicles (SOVs). The One Bay Area Grant Program is a new funding approach that better integrates the region’s federal transportation program with California’s landmark climate change law (Assembly Bill 32, 2006) and Sustainable Communities Strategy program (Senate Bill 375, 2008). Funding distribution to the counties considers progress toward achieving local land use and housing policies by: • Supporting the Sustainable Communities Strategy for the Bay Area by promoting transportation investments in Priority Development Areas (PDAs); and • Providing a higher proportion of funding to local agencies and additional investment flexibility to invest in bicycle and pedestrian improvements, local streets and roadway preservation and planning activities, while also providing specific funding opportunities for Safe Routes to School (SR2S) and Priority Conservation Areas. The goals and policies included in this Element and the Land Use and Community Design Element seek to take advantage of regional planning and funding efforts. They implement strategies that encourage the location of future growth in Cupertino’s Priority Development Areas along Stevens Creek Boulevard and portions of De Anza Boulevard, and by advocating for improved service and improvements to regional infrastructure. LINK BETWEEN LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION In order to maintain and enhance the quality of life for Cupertino residents and businesses, it is important to ensure that future growth does not overwhelm the transportation network, identify ways to limit greenhouse gas emissions, and improve the health of our community. Land use and mobility policies included in the General Plan seek to do so by working together to focus future growth along major mixed-use corridors and within PDAs. Mobility policies also seek to improve the walking/biking environment and enhance transit to ensure that the transportation network is accessible to people of all ages and abilities, including CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-5 school children, the disabled and the elderly. These policies also promote connectivity between neighborhoods and services, and between key nodes in order to reduce reliance on the automobile as the sole mode of transportation. COMPLETE STREETS The California Complete Streets Act (2008) places the planning, designing and building of “Complete Streets” into the larger planning framework of the General Plan by requiring jurisdictions to plan for multi-modal transportation networks. Complete Streets are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, the disabled, motorists, seniors, users of public transportation and movers of commercial goods. These networks allow people to effectively travel to key destinations within their community and the larger region. In addition, all transportation projects should be evaluated as to their ability to improve safety, access and mobility for all travelers and recognize pedestrian, bicycle and transit modes as integral elements of their transportation system. Cupertino has already begun the work of reviewing the existing street network and looking for new opportunities to improve alternative modes of transportation through the construction of sidewalks, walking paths, bike lanes, trails and bridges across pedestrian barriers, such as the Don Burnett Bridge at Mary Avenue. The goals and policies in this Element seek to continue the work of making enhancements to the transportation network to encourage all modes of transportation. GREENHOUSE GASES AND TRANSPORTATION A major challenge of today is meeting the energy needs of a growing population while also protecting air quality and natural resources. The majority of greenhouse gas emissions can be attributed to carbon dioxide emissions from the transportation sector. A 2010 inventory of Cupertino’s community- wide emissions shows that transportation accounts for almost 41 percent of community-wide emissions. Therefore, reducing the number of automobile trips, particularly from single-occupancy vehicles, can provide the greatest benefit in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Cupertino. The goals and policies in this Element work in tandem with other General Plan policies to address issues of sustainability, health and air quality by taking CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) advantage of opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Low-carbon fuels, new and improved vehicle technologies, and land use strategies and infrastructure improvements to reduce the number of vehicle miles traveled can reduce transportation-related emissions significantly. PEDESTRIANS AND BICYCLISTS Cupertino has made considerable strides improving walkability and bikeability with new or improved bike lanes, sidewalks and pedestrian connections. However, many older commercial areas and neighborhoods continue to lack a pedestrian and bike-friendly environment where students can safely walk and bike to school, and families can walk or bike to parks and nearby community facilities and shopping. This was a consistent theme expressed by participants during public workshops conducted as part of the General Plan Amendment. Areas are generally considered walkable if people can safely walk to schools, parks and services within a half mile (less than10-14 minutes) distance. A bike- friendly city provides a network of streets and paths where people can bike safely and conveniently to community facilities, employment and shopping. The goals and policies of this Element, along with the City’s Bicycle Transportation Plan and Pedestrian Plan, seek to further improve and enhance the walking and biking environment through capital improvement projects, development review, and retrofitting existing facilities within older commercial areas and neighborhoods. Figure M-1 identifies existing and planned improvements to bicycle and pedestrian facilities in the city. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT Senate Bill 743 (2013) created a process to change the way that transportation impacts are analyzed under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The process helps achieve the State’s goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and traffic-related air pollution, promotes the development of a multi-modal transportation system, and provides clean, efficient access to major destinations. Specifically, the law requires an alternative to automobile level of service (LOS) for evaluating transportation impacts. Particularly within areas served by transit, alternative criteria are required to promote the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the development of multi-modal transportation networks, and a diversity of land uses. M-6 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-7 Like many cities, Cupertino has used LOS as a performance measure to evaluate traffic impacts. Historically, this has led cities to focus entirely on improvements to auto infrastructure, often to the detriment of other modes of transportation. Consistent with State law, this Element seeks to look at performance measures that balance the needs of all modes of transportation, including automobile, walking, biking and transit. Such new measures can range from looking at vehicle miles traveled (VMT) as a measure of balancing land uses to reviewing seconds of delay for all travel modes as a measure of impacts to traffic. This will allow the City to develop and maintain a Transportation Improvement Plan that includes pedestrian, bicycle, transit and automobile network enhancements, and Transportation Systems Management (TSM) and Travel Demand Management (TDM) measures to improve efficiency of the network. TRANSPORTATION NETWORK Cupertino’s transportation network consists of a variety of street types and pathways. The network determines not only how various land uses are connected but also the modes of transportation used by people to access them. Table M-1 defines the various street types and paths in terms of their character, adjoining current and future land uses, modes of travel that they currently support, and improvements needed to enhance access for all modes of transportation. Close alignment of the City’s Capital Improvement Program with Community Vision 2040 priorities will allow the City to strategically plan and direct resources to develop this multi-modal transportation infrastructure. Figure M-2 shows the geographical locations of the major roadways. CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD TANTAU Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Heart of the City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas * Note: see Complete Streets policy for implementation Bike Lanes on Street Bike Paths Off Street Bike Route Right of Way Public Access N LU-1 FIGURE M-1 CURRENT (2014) AND PROPOSED BICYCLE NETWORK M-8 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (TSM) TSM is an approach to congestion mitigation that identifies improvements to enhance the capacity of existing roadways through better operations. These techniques help improve traffic flow, air quality and movement of vehicles and goods, as well as enhance system accessibility and safety. TSM strategies are low-cost and effective, and typically include: intersection and signal improvements; data collection to monitor system performance; and/or special events management strategies. TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT (TDM) TDM seeks to reduce travel demand (specifically that of single-occupancy car) by encouraging other modes of travel through requirements and/or incentives. TDM strategies typically include: commute trip reduction programs; parking policies; and/or incentives to take transit or other modes of transportation. CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table M-1: Street Typology Type Mode(s) of Transportation Guidelines Freeway Limited access, part of a regional and/or State network subject to State design standards. Expressway Limited access, regional and part of a county network subject to County design standards. Boulevard (Arterial)Access and safe crossing for all modes of travel along a regional transportation corridor. May include medians to separate directional travel. City or multi-jurisdictional design standards apply. Main Street Balances all modes of transportation, includes on-street parking and connects to highly pedestrian-oriented uses. Vehicular performance measures may be lowered to prioritize walking and biking. Avenue (Major and Minor Collector)Connector that distributes trips to commercial and residential areas from boulevards, and provides balanced levels of service for auto, bikes and pedestrians. Neighborhood Connector Primarily serves and connects neighborhoods and neighborhood services, and facilitates safe walking and biking. May contain elements of Avenues including landscaped median or bus service. Residential Street Provides access to low-intensity residential uses, prioritizes walking and biking, and are typically good candidates for traffic calming. Regional Pedestrian/Bike Pathway Part of regional network providing high quality pedestrian and bike paths to connect to other regional destinations. Local Pedestrian/Bike Pathway Connects to regional network but part of local infrastructure, provides quality pedestrian and bike paths connecting local destinations. M-10 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir ALVES DRMARY AVELAZANZEO DR RODRIGUES A V E PACIFICA DR BARNHART AVE KIRWIN LNORANGE AVEVISTA DRMIRA VISTA RDGREENLEAF DR FINCH AVEPHARLAP AVEVOSS AVE PORTAL AVEMANN DRCOLUMBUS AVE HYANNISPORT DR LINDA VISTA DRSunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Freeway and Expressways 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Boulevards (Arterials) Avenues (Major Collectors) Neighborhood Connectors N Main Street Avenues (Minor Collectors) LU-1 FIGURE M-2 CIRCULATION NETWORK M-11 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LOOKING FORWARD Maintaining Cupertino’s great quality of life – including convenient access, clean air, and reduced traffic – requires careful management of growth. The City will identify ways to locate appropriate land uses along major mixed-use corridors, improving overall access and connectivity, enhancing the attractiveness of non- vehicular transportation modes, and reducing demand on the roadway network. The following are ways the City will address key challenges and opportunities facing Cupertino: BETTER LINKAGES BETWEEN LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION. How we use our land directly impacts our transportation facilities, modes of travel and vice versa. A primary cornerstone of Community Vision 2040 is to focus growth on major mixed-use corridors; support alternate modes of transportation including walking, biking and transit; and encourage a mix of compatible and complementary uses on key sites. These strategies will allow the City to manage growth with reduced traffic, air quality and greenhouse gas impacts. IMPROVED REGIONAL COORDINATION. The City should continue to participate in regional projects and infrastructure planning to ensure consistency with local planning, and pursue funding for City transportation projects. ENHANCED CONNECTIVITY. A key objective of the City is to improve connections through streetscape and pathway improvements to ensure that the community enjoys easy walking and biking access to services including parks, schools and shopping. Other strategies seek to supplement existing modes of transportation such as community shuttles through partnerships and agreements and providing links between key transportation nodes. REDUCED DEMAND. The strategies in this Element seek to reduce demand on the City’s roadway infrastructure through careful land use planning, encourage alternative modes of transportation and utilize best practices in Transportation Demand Management (TDM) and Transportation Systems Management (TSM). 1 2 3 4 M-12 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-13 POLICY M-1.1: REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING Participate in regional transportation planning processes to develop programs consistent with the goals and policies of Cupertino’s General Plan and to minimize adverse impacts on the City’s circulation system. Work with neighboring cities to address regional transportation and land use issues of mutual interest. POLICY M-1.2: TRANSPORTATION IMPACT ANALYSIS Participate in the development of new multi-modal analysis methods and impact thresholds as required by Senate Bill 743. However, until such impact thresholds are developed, continue to optimize mobility for all modes of transportation while striving to maintain the following intersection Levels of Service (LOS) at a.m. and p.m. peak traffic hours: • Major intersections: LOS D • Stevens Creek Boulevard and De Anza Boulevard: LOS E+ • Stevens Creek Boulevard and Stelling Road: LOS E+ • De Anza Boulevard and Bollinger Road: LOS E+ POLICY M-1.3: REGIONAL TRAIL DEVELOPMENT Continue to plan and provide for a comprehensive system of trails and pathways consistent with regional systems, including the Bay Trail, Stevens Creek Corridor and Ridge Trail. REGIONAL COORDINATION Regional transportation and land use decisions affect the operation of the transportation network in Cupertino. A key consideration of the General Plan is for the City to participate in regional planning initiatives in order to coordinate local improvements with regional initiatives, advocate for Cupertino’s needs, and take advantage of programs that can support Cupertino’s transportation infrastructure. GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of Cupertino GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of Cupertino CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) COMPLETE STREETS Complete Streets policies encourage the design of streets that respond to the needs of all members of the community, balance different modes of transportation, promote the health and well-being of the community, and support environmental sustainability. M-14 POLICY M-2.1: STREET DESIGN Adopt and maintain street design standards to optimize mobility for all transportation modes including automobiles, walking, bicycling and transit. POLICY M-2.2: ADJACENT LAND USE Design roadway alignments, lane widths, medians, parking and bicycle lanes, crosswalks and sidewalks to complement adjacent land uses in keeping with the vision of the Planning Area. Strive to minimize adverse impacts and expand alternative transportation options for all Planning Areas (Special Areas and Neighborhoods). Improvement standards shall also consider the urban, suburban and rural environments found within the city. STRATEGIES: M-2.2.1: Rural Road Improvement Standards. Consider candidate rural roads and develop specific street improvement standards that preserve the rural character of these streets. Rural roads would typically feature natural landscaping, no sidewalks and narrow unpaved shoulders. M-2.2.2: Semi-Rural Road Improvement Standards. Consider candidate semi-rural roads where curb and gutter improvements, and no sidewalks, are appropriate. GOAL M-2 Promote improvements to city streets that safely accommodate all transportation modes and persons of all abilities CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-15 M-2.2.3: Urban Road Improvement Standards. Develop urban improvement standards for arterials such as Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevards. In these areas, standards may include wide sidewalks, tree wells, seating, bike racks and appropriate street furniture. M-2.2.4: Suburban Road Improvement Standards. Develop suburban road improvement standards for all streets not designated as rural, semi-rural or in the Crossroads Area. POLICY M-2.3: CONNECTIVITY Promote pedestrian and bicycle improvements that improve connectivity between planning areas, neighborhoods and services, and foster a sense of community. POLICY M-2.4: COMMUNITY IMPACTS Reduce traffic impacts and support alternative modes of transportation rather than constructing barriers to mobility. Do not close streets unless there is a demonstrated safety or over-whelming through traffic problem and there are no acceptable alternatives since street closures move the problem from one street to another. POLICY M-2.5: PUBLIC ACCESSIBILITY Ensure all new public and private streets are publicly accessible to improve walkability and reduce impacts on existing streets. POLICY M-2.6: TRAFFIC CALMING Consider the implementation of best practices on streets to reduce speeds and make them user-friendly for alternative modes of transportation, including pedestrians and bicyclists. CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-16 WALKABILITY AND BIKEABILITY Walkability and bikeability policies encourage a livable, healthy, sustainable and connected city with a safe and comfortable pedestrian network among its various neighborhoods, parks, trails, employment centers, community facilities, neighborhood centers and commercial centers. POLICY M-3.1: BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN MASTER PLAN Adopt and maintain a Bicycle and Pedestrian master plan, which outlines policies and improvements to streets, extension of trails, and pathways to create a safe way for people of all ages to bike and walk on a daily basis, and as shown in Figure M-1. POLICY M-3.2: DEVELOPMENT Require new development and redevelopment to increase connectivity through direct and safe pedestrian connections to public amenities, neighborhoods, shopping and employment destinations throughout the city. POLICY M-3.3: PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE CROSSINGS Enhance pedestrian and bicycle crossings and pathways at key locations across physical barriers such as creeks, highways and road barriers. POLICY M-3.4: STREET WIDTHS Preserve and enhance citywide pedestrian and bike connectivity by limiting street widening purely for automobiles as a means of improving traffic flow. POLICY M-3.5: CURB CUTS Minimize the number and the width of driveway openings. GOAL M-3 Support a safe pedestrian and bicycle street network for people of all ages and abilities CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) STRATEGIES: M-3.5.1: Shared Driveway Access. Encourage property owners to use shared driveway access and interconnected roads within blocks, where feasible. Require driveway access closures, consolidations or both when a site is remodeled or redeveloped. M-3.5.2: Direct Access from Secondary Streets. Encourage property with frontages on major and secondary streets to provide direct access to driveways from the secondary street. POLICY M-3.6: SAFE SPACES FOR PEDESTRIANS Require parking lots to include clearly defined paths for pedestrians to provide a safe path to building entrances. POLICY M-3.7: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Plan for improvements to pedestrian and bicycle facilities and eliminate gaps along the pedestrian and bicycle network as part of the City’s Capital Improvement Program. POLICY M-3.8: BICYCLE PARKING Require new development and redevelopment to provide public and private bicycle parking. POLICY M-3.9: OUTREACH Actively engage the community in promoting walking and bicycling through education, encouragement and outreach on improvement projects and programs. POLICY M-3.10: PROACTIVE ENFORCEMENT Prioritize enforcement of traffic speeds and regulations on all streets with bike lanes, bike routes, and around schools. M-17 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-18 TRANSIT Transit policies encourage planning and coordination of regional and local transit services, both public and private, to accommodate diverse community needs and to make transit a safe, comfortable and efficient option POLICY M-4.1: TRANSIT AGENCIES Coordinate with VTA to improve transportation service, infrastructure and access in the city, and to connect to transportation facilities such as Caltrain and VTA light rail stations. POLICY M-4.2: LOCAL TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Create or partner with transit providers, employers, educational institutions, and major commercial entities to minimize gaps within local transportation services. POLICY M-4.3: CONNECTING SPECIAL AREAS Identify and implement new or enhanced transit services to connect all Special Areas as identified in Figure PA-1 (Chapter 2: Planning Areas). POLICY M-4.4: TRANSIT FACILITIES WITH NEW DEVELOPMENT Work with VTA and/or major developments to ensure all new development projects include amenities to support public transit including bus stop shelters, space for transit vehicles as appropriate and attractive amenities such as trash receptacles, signage, seating and lighting. GOAL M-4 Promote local and regional transit that is efficient, frequent and convenient and reduces traffic impacts CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY M-4.5: ACCESS TO TRANSIT SERVICES Support right-of-way design and amenities consistent with local transit goals to improve transit as a viable alternative to driving. POLICY M-4.6: BUS AND SHUTTLE PROGRAMS Work with large regional employers and private commuter bus/shuttle programs to provide safe pick-up, drop-off, and park and rides in order to reduce single occupancy vehicle trips. POLICY M-4.7: VALLCO SHOPPING DISTRICT TRANSFER STATION Work with VTA and/or other transportation service organizations to study and develop a transit transfer station that incorporates a hub for alternative transportation services such as, car sharing, bike sharing and/ or other services. M-19 CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-20 SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL Safe routes to schools policies protect the safety of school children and promote health, environmental sustainability and social interaction. They leverage local, regional and national Safe Routes to Schools Program resources to support increased walking and bicycling to schools. POLICY M-5.1: SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOLS Promote Safe Routes to Schools programs for all schools serving the city. STRATEGIES: M-5.1.1. Coordination with School Districts. Coordinate with the School Districts to develop plans and programs that encourage car/van-pooling, stagger hours of adjacent schools, establish drop-off locations, and encourage walking and bicycling to school. M-5.1.2. Teen Commission. Encourage the Teen Commission to work with schools to encourage year- round programs to incentivize walking and biking to school. POLICY M-5.2: PRIORITIZING PROJECTS Ensure that bicycle and pedestrian safety improvements include projects to enhance safe accessibility to schools. POLICY M-5.3: CONNECTIONS TO TRAILS Connect schools to the citywide trail system. POLICY M-5.4: EDUCATION Support education programs that promote safe walking and bicycling to schools. GOAL M-5 Ensure safe and efficient pedestrian and bicycle access to schools while working to reduce school-related congestion CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY M-6.1: PARKING CODES Maintain efficient and updated parking standards to ensure that development provides adequate parking, both on- street and off-street depending on the characteristics of the development, while also reducing reliance on the automobile. POLICY M-6.2: OFF-STREET PARKING Ensure new off-street parking is properly designed and efficiently used. VEHICLE PARKING Vehicle parking policies encourage efficient and adequate parking, avoid negative effects on the pedestrian environment or surrounding neighborhoods, and support the City’s goals for Complete Streets, walkability, bikeability and effective transit. M-21 GOAL M-6 Promote innovative strategies to provide efficient and adequate vehicle parking CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-22 TRANSPORTATION IMPACT ANALYSIS Transportation Impact Analysis policies enable effective, informed transportation planning by using a more balanced system of indicators, data and monitoring to evaluate the city’s multi-modal transportation system and optimize travel by all transportation modes. POLICY M-7.1: MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION IMPACT ANALYSIS Follow guidelines set by the VTA related to transportation impact analyses, while conforming to State goals for multi-modal performance targets. POLICY M-7.2: PROTECTED INTERSECTIONS Consider adopting a Protected Intersection policy, which would identify intersections where improvements would not be considered, which would degrade levels of service for non-vehicular modes of transportation. Potential locations include intersections in Priority Development Areas (PDAs) and other areas where non-vehicular transportation is a key consideration, such as, near shopping districts, schools, parks and senior citizen developments. GOAL M-7 Review and update TIA policies and guidelines that allow for adequate consideration for all modes of transportation including automobiles, walking, bicycles and transit CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY M-8.1: GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS Promote transportation policies that help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. POLICY M-8.2: LAND USE Support development and transportation improvements that help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing per capita Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), reducing impacts on the City’s transportation network and maintaining the desired levels of service for all modes of transportation. POLICY M-8.3: TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (TSM) PROGRAMS Employ TSM strategies to improve efficiency of the transportation infrastructure including strategic right-of-way improvements, intelligent transportation systems and optimization of signal timing to coordinate traffic flow. POLICY M-8.4: TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT (TDM) PROGRAMS Require large employers, including colleges and schools, to develop and maintain TDM programs to reduce vehicle trips generated by their employees and students and develop a tracking method to monitor results. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND AIR QUALITY Greenhouse gas emissions and air quality policies in this Element work in tandem with other General Plan policies to reduce municipal and community-wide greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality throughout Cupertino. M-23 GOAL M-8 Promote policies to help achieve state, regional and local air quality and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-24 POLICY M-8.5: DESIGN OF NEW DEVELOPMENTS Encourage new commercial developments to provide shared office facilities, cafeterias, daycare facilities, lunchrooms, showers, bicycle parking, home offices, shuttle buses to transit facilities and other amenities that encourage the use of transit, bicycling or walking as commute modes to work. Provide pedestrian pathways and orient buildings to the street to encourage pedestrian activity. POLICY M-8.6: ALTERNATIVE FUEL CHARGING STATIONS Develop a city-wide strategy to encourage the construction of a network of public and private alternative fuel vehicle charging/ fueling stations. CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND COMMUNITY CHARACTER ELEMENT | cupertino community vision 2040 POLICY M-9.1: EFFICIENT AUTOMOBILE INFRASTRUCTURE Strive to maximize the efficiency of existing infrastructure by locating appropriate land uses along roadways and retrofitting streets to be accessible for all modes of transportation. POLICY M-9.2: REDUCED TRAVEL DEMAND Promote effective TDM programs for existing and new development. POLICY M-9.3: STREET WIDTH Except as required by environmental review for new developments, limit widening of streets as a means of improving traffic efficiency and focus instead on operational improvements to preserve community character. STRATEGIES: M-9.3.1. Wolfe Road Overcrossing. Consider alternate designs for the Wolfe Road/I-280 Interchange (e.g., from partial cloverleaf design to diamond design) when evaluating the need to widen the freeway overcrossing. M-9.3.2. Streetscape Design. When reviewing the widening of an existing street, consider aesthetically pleasing enhancements and amenities to improve the safe movement of pedestrians and bicyclists in keeping with the vision of the Planning Area. ROADWAY SYSTEM EFFICIENCY Roadway system efficiency policies make effective use of roadway capacity by encouraging strategic roadway improvements and complementary policies promoting transit, walking, bicycling and complete streets. M-25 GOAL M-9 Promote effective and efficient use of the city's transportation network and services CHAPTER 5: MOBILITY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) M-26 TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE Transportation infrastructure policies promote safe, attractive and well- maintained facilities for walking, bicycling, transit and automobiles. POLICY M-10.1: TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN Develop and implement an updated citywide transportation improvement plan necessary to accommodate vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle transportation improvements to meet the City’s needs. POLICY M-10.2: TRANSPORTATION IMPACT FEE Ensure sustainable funding levels for the Transportation Improvement Plan by enacting a transportation impact fee for new development. POLICY M-10.3: MULTI-MODAL IMPROVEMENTS Integrate the financing, design and construction of pedestrian and bicycle facilities with street projects. Build pedestrian and bicycle improvements at the same time as improvements for vehicular circulation to enable travelers to transition from one mode of transportation to another (e.g., bicycle to bus). POLICY M-10.4: ROADWAY MAINTENANCE FUNDING Identify and secure new funding sources to fund the on-going routine maintenance of roadways. GOAL M-10 Ensure that the City's transportation infrastructure is well-maintained for all modes of transportation and that projects are prioritized on their ability to meet the City's mobilities goals environmental resources and sustainability 6 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) ES-2 Cupertino’s long-term environmental, economic and social prosperity depends on ensuring that land use planning and development recognizes the link between the built and natural environments. Today, more than half the planet’s population live in either a city or suburb, and it is projected that by 2050 more than 80 percent of all people will live within urban areas. Water and other natural resources that support cities originates in natural areas, which have become places of vast resource extraction to feed the needs of a growing human population. As a result, once “untouched” and pristine ecological systems have become strained by the enormous impact of human activity. To support these growing urban and suburban populations, while seeking to mitigate their continued demands on our landscape, cities need to identify and systemically prioritize ways because human activity has such a large impact on the environment, cities need to identify ways to protect and restore natural ecosystems through land use decisions, building designs and resource conservation. This entails that community guardians and planners apply the principals of sustainability, only achieved by embedding social equity, economic and the environmental considerations throughout the development process, including mobility, infrastructure, water and energy use, buildings, streetscape and landscape, and land use planning. This Element includes goals, policies and strategies that help Cupertino think more holistically about sustainability, and in doing so, improve the ecological health and the quality of life for the community. Introduction ES-2 Introduction ES-3 Context Climate Change Air Quality Energy Buildings Natural Resources Mineral Resources Water ES-12 Looking Forward ES-13 Goals and Policies Planning and Regional Coordination Energy Sustainability Sustainable Buildings Air Quality Urban and Rural Ecosystems Mineral Resources Water CONTENTS: CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) CLIMATE CHANGE In 2006, the California Legislature and Governor took significant steps to address climate change concerns with the passage of the Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32). The law set a target to reduce California’s greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by year 2020. In addition, the Governor also signed Executive Order S-3-05 that required California to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by 80 percent below the 1990 levels by year 2050. Many initiatives at the State, regional and local levels are being implemented to help achieve these goals. These include: • The Sustainable Communities and Climate Protection Act of 2008 (SB 375) supports the State’s climate action goals to reduce GHG emissions through coordinated transportation and land use planning. Each of California’s Metropolitan Planning Organizations must prepare a Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) as an integral part of its Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) to achieve these targets. For the nine-county Bay Area, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) have prepared the One Bay Area Plan as its SCS. This plan contains land use, housing and transportation strategies that allow the region to meet its GHG reduction targets. • The One Bay Area Grant (OBAG) program, which implements transportation funding in coordination with the strategies in the One Bay Area Plan. • The City is in the process of completing its Climate Action Plan (CAP), which aims to address GHG reductions per the targets set in AB 32 and S-3-05. The CAP is based on 2040 growth projections for Cupertino. It aims to capture the shortfall projected from State initiatives by identifying policies and strategies to reduce GHG at a municipal and community-wide level. CONTEXT ES-3 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) AIR QUALITY Clean air is a basic need for human and environmental health. Air pollution comes from both mobile sources (e.g., cars, trucks, airplanes) and stationary sources (e.g., agricultural and industrial uses). Air quality standards are established by both the State Air Resources Board and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) has the responsibility to create strategies and monitor the targets set by State and Federal standards for the Bay Area. Due to air quality planning efforts, regional air quality has improved significantly over the past several decades, even though the population, traffic and industrialization have increased. BAAQMD’s 2010 Clean Air Plan works in tandem with the One Bay Area Plan and identifies strategies to address four categories of pollutants including ground-level ozone, particulate matter, air toxics and GHG. The City’s CAP aims to capture the shortfall projected from State initiatives to reduce GHG at a municipal and community-wide level. While standards are a key component in improving air quality, the City’s approach towards land use, mobility, infrastructure and operations can have a huge impact. ENERGY Energy consumption in the United States and in Cupertino is mainly fossil- fuel based (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.). The continuously rising cost of energy production, together with diminishing non-renewable fossil fuels, has necessitated a change towards reduction and efficient use of fossil fuels, and identifying and increasing the use of alternative, renewable energy sources. Energy providers are also looking to move their portfolio towards alternative energy sources including wind turbine, nuclear and solar generation. The diminishing cost of installing smaller solar power generation systems is encouraging the increased use of such facilities by consumers. Additionally, strides in automobile technology utilizing electric batteries and improvements to the network of charging stations allows users confidence in the use of electric cars. Finally, rising energy costs and Federal and State standards on energy usage are encouraging more people to replace existing appliances and other equipment with more energy efficient equipment. ES-4 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Cupertino has continued to express its commitment to conserving energy by improving municipal operations in order to reduce energy use (e.g., retrofitting or replacing street equipment, vehicles and facilities), and providing resources and information to professionals, residents, businesses and schools to achieve energy and associated cost savings. BUILDINGS The 2010 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory for Cupertino indicates that buildings account for about 55 percent of GHG emissions in the city. This means that State and local efforts towards energy conservation in buildings can significantly affect the community’s air quality. While green building strategies can effectively target GHG, they also improve the health of occupants, preserve habitat and natural landscapes, reduce water pollution and conserve other natural resources. State and local efforts to encourage green buildings include the following: • The State routinely updates building code standards to include new energy conservation and green building concepts. The 2013 CalGreen Building Code outlines mandatory and voluntary measures to encourage sustainable practices in all aspects of construction such as planning and design; energy and water efficiency and conservation; material conservation; resource efficiency; and environmental quality. • Cupertino has adopted a Green Building Ordinance that ensures that new buildings and renovations exceed the sustainability and ecological standards set by the State. NATURAL RESOURCES BIODIVERSITY Biodiversity refers to the diversity, or variety, of plants and animals in a particular ecosystem, area or region. Cupertino’s commitment to sustainability includes sustaining the diversity of species in each ecosystem as we plan for human activities that affect the use of land and natural resources. Cupertino’s ecosystem ranges from the urban environment in the flatlands to semi-rural and rural environment in the western foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains. ES-5 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) The City has always recognized the importance of sustaining biodiversity in the foothills and along riparian corridors. However, a commitment to sustainability will require a different way of thinking about the urban ecosystem. The City has already preserved an 18-acre site and restored creek habitat right in the city to maintain biodiversity and ecological integrity of our local natural systems. The City is now looking at opportunities in the built and natural environment to sustain and enhance biodiversity. URBAN ECOSYSTEMS While an urban environment can be stressful for some species due to pollution and habitat fragmentation, others may thrive in this environment because humans create favorable microhabitats or abundant resources for them. Modified habitats including greenhouses, basements, compost piles and green roofs can help certain plant and animal species thrive better than in natural environments. As Cupertino continues to change and grow, the City is committed to enhancing the urban ecosystem in the form of urban forestry management, integration of green infrastructure, treatment of parks and open space, landscape and building requirements. RURAL ECOSYSTEMS Cupertino’s rural plant and animal resources are located in the relatively undeveloped western foothills and mountains, near the Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve and along Stevens Creek. Each ecosystem of vegetation provides food and shelter to support a variety of wildlife. The diversity of plant and animal life supported in different ecosystems is identified in Table ES-1 and Figure ES-1. ES-6 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Ecosystem Location Plant Resources Animal Resources Riparian • Grows along stream courses • Valuable habitat for wildlife due to presence of water, lush vegetation and high insect populations • Stevens Creek• Permanente Creek• Regnart Creek• Heney Creek• Calabazas Creek • Willow• California Buckeye• Coast Live Oak• Coyote Brush• Poison Oak• California blackberry Relatively undisturbed riparian areas support a wide variety of wildlife species including:• Amphibians• Reptiles• Birds• Mammals Grasslands• Composed primarily of non-native grasses • Formerly used as pasture • Occur on lower slopes of western foothills • Scattered locations on higher elevations in Montebello Ridge system • Wild oat• Clover• Rye grass• Vetch• Spring wild flower bloom (such as California Poppy, Plantago or Owl Clover) Reptilian and mammal species adapted to dry conditions including:• Western Fence Lizard• Western Rattlesnake• Common King Snake • Burrowing rodents (such as Meadow mice or California ground squirrel Brushlands• Scrubby, dense vegetation that often integrates with Woodlands • Found on dry, rocky and steep slopes • Coyote brush• Poison oak• California sage• Ceanothus • Mule deer• Brush rabbit• Bobcat• Coyote Foothill Woodlands and Forests• Scattered Oak trees with an undergrowth in some areas of plants • Large trees • Foothills• Higher elevations • Oak trees• Mixed Hardwood trees• Evergreens including redwoods • Insect/seed eating birds and mammals• Raptors, including owls• Large mammals including deer, coyote Table ES-1: Plant and Animal Resources ES-7 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) SantaCruz C ountySantaClaraCounty Riparian Intermitant Riparian Wet Soil Grassland Riparian Flowing Riparian Flowing Grassland Foothill Woodland Quarry Quarry Grass-land Riparian Intermitant Deciduous Forest Foothill Woodland Deciduous Forest / Chaparral Grassland Grassland RiparianPermanent Mixed Evergreen Forest Chaparral Coniferous Forest Grassland Quarry Riparian IntermitantFOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAStevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Forest Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas N LU-1 FIGURE ES-1 VEGETATION ES-8 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) MINERAL RESOURCES The State of California, recognizing the value of preserving mineral deposits to achieve a more sustainable future, enacted the Surface Mining and Reclamation Act (SMARA) in 1975. The objective of SMARA is to assist local governments in conserving mineral deposits for future use. There are several mineral resource areas located both in Cupertino’s sphere of influence and within the city limit. These mineral resource areas are shown in Figure ES-2. The figure identifies natural resource areas that will be conserved for future extraction, which are outside of the city limits. Two quarries within the city’s sphere of influence, Hanson Permanente and Stevens Creek, have been designated by the State as having mineral deposits of regional or state significance. These quarries are located in the unincorporated area outside city limits, and therefore, Santa Clara County has regulatory jurisdiction. The County’s mineral resource policies are directed toward preserving existing resource areas and, where feasible, designating new areas and expanding existing sites. The McDonald-Dorsa quarry, which used to operate south of the Deep Cliff Golf Course and Linda Vista Park, was closed in the 1970s and is not a current source of minerals. The site has since been designated as residential, while the portion that is now Linda Vista Park is designated for parks and open space. However, since it was closed prior to SMARA, redevelopment in the area should address soils stabilization and reclamation issues. ES-9 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Mineral Resource Areas Urban / Low Density Hillside BoundarySource: State of California Resources Agency. Department of Conservation. Los Altos MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates that significant mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged that a high likelihood for their presence exists. MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance of which cannot be evaluated from available data. 2 3 Urban / Suburban Developed - Unsuitable for Extraction Low Density Hillside - Incompatible with Extraction Unincorporated Area Outside the Urban Service Area is Appropriate for Conservation and Future Extraction 3 3 2 3 3 Depleted2 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Heart of the City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas N LU-1 FIGURE ES-2 MINERAL RESOURCES ES-10 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) WATER Cupertino’s sustainable future is, in part, dependent upon the supply and use of water as well as the effective management of natural watershed resources. In recent years, water resource management has moved away from supply side efforts (e.g., creation of dams and reservoirs) to managing how water is used. In particular, this includes emphasizing conservation, stormwater treatment and efficiency in infrastructure planning, design and construction of buildings, and land use planning. The following is a list of existing State, regional and local efforts towards water conservation. • The Santa Clara Valley Water District is the groundwater management agency in Santa Clara County. The Santa Clara Valley Groundwater sub-basin provides approximately half of the total county water demands. The District works to maximize water supply, protect the basins from contamination and ensure that groundwater supply is sustained. • The San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) implements the Clean Water Act for the Bay Area region including the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Municipal Storm Water permit which regulates both point source and non-point source pollutants to improve ground water resources and reduce pollution in the bay. This program is discussed in detail in the Infrastructure Element. • Senate Bill X7-7 was enacted in November 2009, requiring all water suppliers to increase water use efficiency and sets a goal of reducing per capita urban water use by 20 percent by 2020. The bill includes a short-term target of a 10 percent reduction in per capita urban water use by 2015. • The City of Cupertino has adopted a Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance and Green Building Ordinance to ensure that the city can meet State and regional targets. ES-11 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LOOKING FORWARD Future growth and change in Cupertino provides both a challenge and an opportunity for the City and community. Cupertino is blessed with an abundance of natural and urban ecosystems. In the past, the City has relied on a limited toolkit of policies to ensure that growth and development do not negatively impact natural resources. Great strides have been made in the last decade to promote sustainability, and community support for these initiatives has been growing. In response, the City has created a suite of services and policies, to ensure our community’s growth and achievement of its development potential enhances, not hinders, natural resources and bolsters, not impacts, human health. The City now has a much larger array of resources to manage growth, including sustainability practices, new planning and development tools, and performance measures to maintain or enhance natural resources and overall environmental health. REGIONAL COOPERATION. Federal, State and regional agencies have been at the forefront of legislation related to sustainability and environmental health. The City should strive to exceed these requirements in areas that are of priority to the community and strengthen regional partnerships to bring in resources for implementing new policies and programs. ECOSYSTEMS. In recent years, cities have begun to realize that urban and suburban areas can provide habitat for many plant and animal species. The City will focus policies on a citywide approach (urban and natural environments) towards sustaining and improving urban and suburban ecosystems. SUSTAINABILITY BEST PRACTICES. The City will use sustainability principles, striving always to balance social equity with economic and environmental health, when evaluating all aspects of new development; mobility and infrastructure improvements; building design and operation; streetscapes and landscaping; and citywide land use planning. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT. The City will encourage community participation in the planning and implementation of sustainability-related programs. 1 2 3 4 ES-12 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL ES-1 Ensure a sustainable future for the city of Cupertino POLICY ES-1.1: PRINCIPLES OF SUSTAINABILITY Incorporate the principles of sustainability into Cupertino’s planning, infrastructure and development process in order to improve the environment, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and meet the needs of the community without compromising the needs of future generations. STRATEGIES: ES-1.1.1: Climate Action Plan (CAP). Adopt, implement and maintain a Climate Action Plan to attain greenhouse gas emission targets consistent with state law and regional requirements. This qualified greenhouse gas emissions reduction plan, by BAAQMD’s definition, will allow for future project CEQA streamlining and will identify measures to: • Reduce energy use through conservation and efficiency; • Reduce fossil fuel use through multi-modal and alternative transportation; • Maximize use of and, where feasible, install renewable energy resources; • Increase citywide water conservation and recycled water use; • Accelerate Resource Recovery through expanded recycling, composting, extended producer responsibility and procurement practices; and • Promote and incentivize each of those efforts to maximize ES-13 The City seeks to coordinate its local sustainability and greenhouse gas reduction planning efforts with Federal, State and regional plans and programs to ensure a consistent, integrated and efficient approach to a sustainable future. PLANNING AND REGIONAL COORDINATION CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) community participation and impacts; • Integrate multiple benefits of green infrastructure with climate resiliency and adaptation. ES-1.1.2: CAP and Sustainability Strategies Implementation. Periodically review and report on the effectiveness of the measures outlined in the CAP and the strategies in this Element. Institutionalize sustainability by developing a methodology to ensure all environmental, social and lifecycle costs are considered in project, program, policy and budget decisions. ES-1.1.3: Climate Adaptation and Resiliency. Conduct a climate vulnerability assessment and set preparedness goals and strategies to safeguard human health and community assets susceptible to the impacts of a changing climate (e.g., increased drought, wildfires, flooding). Incorporate these into all relevant plans, including the Emergency Preparedness Plan, Local Hazard Mitigation Plan, Dam Failure Plan, Climate Action Plan, Watershed Protection Plan, and Energy Assuredness Plan. POLICY ES-1.2: REGIONAL GROWTH AND TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION Coordinate with local and regional agencies to prepare updates to regional growth plans and strategies, including the Regional Housing Allocation Needs Allocation (RHNA), One Bay Area Plan, Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS). STRATEGY: ES-1.2.1: Local Plan Consistency with Regional Plans. Update and maintain local plans and strategies so they are consistent with One Bay Area Plan to qualify for State transportation and project CEQA streamlining. ES-14 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY ES-2.1: CONSERVATION AND EFFICIENT USE OF ENERGY RESOURCES Encourage the maximum feasible conservation and efficient use of electrical power and natural gas resources for new and existing residences, businesses, industrial and public uses. STRATEGIES: ES-2.1.1: Coordination. Continue to evaluate, and revise as necessary, applicable City plans, codes and procedures for inclusion of Federal, State and regional requirements and conservation targets. ES-2.1.2: Comprehensive Energy Management. Prepare and implement a comprehensive energy management plan for all applicable municipal facilities and equipment to achieve the energy goals established in the City’s Climate Action Plan. Track the City’s energy use and report findings as part of the Climate Action Plan reporting schedule. Embed this plan into the City’s Environmentally Preferable Procurement Policy to ensure measures are achieved through all future procurement and construction practices. ES-2.1.3: Energy Efficient Replacements. Continue to use life cycle cost analysis to identify City assets for replacement with more energy efficient technology. Utilize available tools to benchmark and showcase city energy efficiency achievements (i.e. EPA Portfolio Manager, statewide Green Business Program). ENERGY SUSTAINABILITY Since energy consumption is the largest contributor to GHG emissions, the City seeks to conserve energy to reach state and regional emissions targets. GOAL ES-2 Promote conservation of energy resources ES-15 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) ES-2.1.4: Incentive Program. Consider incentive programs for projects that exceed mandatory requirements and promote incentives from state, county and federal governments for improving energy efficiency and expanding renewable energy installations. ES-2.1.5: Urban Forest. Encourage the inclusion of additional shade trees, vegetated stormwater treatment and landscaping to reduce the “heat island effect” in development projects. ES-2.1.6: Alternate Energy Sources. Promote and increase the use of alternate and renewable energy resources for the entire community through effective policies, programs and incentives. ES-2.1.7: Energy Co-generation Systems. Encourage the use of energy co- generation systems through the provision of an awareness program targeting the larger commercial and industrial users and public facilities. ES-2.1.8: Energy Audits and Financing. Continue to offer and leverage regional partners’ programs to conduct energy audits and/or subvention programs for homes, commercial, industrial and city facilities, and recommend improvements that lead to energy and cost savings opportunities for participants and encourage adoption of alternative energy technologies. Encourage energy audits to include emerging online and application-based energy analytics and diagnostic tools. Share residential and commercial energy efficiency and renewable energy financing tools through outreach events and civic media assets. ES-2.1.9: Energy Efficient Transportation Modes. Continue to encourage fuel-efficient transportation modes such as alternative fuel vehicles, driverless vehicles, public transit, car and van- pooling, community and regional shuttle systems, car and bike sharing programs, safe routes to schools, commuter benefits, and pedestrian and bicycle paths through infrastructure investment, development incentives, and community education. ES-2.1.10: Community Choice Energy. Collaborate with regional partners to evaluate feasibility for development of a Community Choice Energy Program. ES-16 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY ES-3.1: GREEN BUILDING DESIGN Set standards for the design and construction of energy and resource conserving/efficient building. STRATEGIES: ES-3.1.1: Green Building Program. Periodically review and revise the City’s Green Building ordinance to ensure alignment with CALGreen requirements for all major private and public projects that ensure reduction in energy and water use for new development through site selection and building design. ES-3.1.2: Staff Training. Continue to train appropriate City staff in the design principles, costs and benefits of sustainable building and landscape design. Encourage City staff to attend external trainings on these topics and attain relevant program certifications (e.g., Green Point Rater, Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Accredited Professional). SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS The City seeks to improve building efficiency from planning, construction and operations to help improve indoor air quality and conserve materials and natural resources. GOAL ES-3 Improve building efficiency and energy conservation ES-17 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) ES-3.1.3: Green Buildings Informational Seminars. Conduct and/or participate in Green Building informational seminars and workshops for members of the design and construction industry, land development, real estate sales, lending institutions, landscaping and design, the building maintenance industry and prospective project applicants. ES-3.1.4: Green Building Demonstration. Pursue municipal facility retrofits, through a Green Capital Improvement Program (CIP), and new construction projects that exceed CalGreen and achieve third-party certification criteria (e.g., LEED, Living Building Challenge, Zero Net Energy) as a means of creating demonstration spaces for developer and community enrichment. ES-18 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY ES-4.1: NEW DEVELOPMENT Minimize the air quality impacts of new development projects and air quality impacts that affect new development. STRATEGIES: ES-4.1.1: Toxic Air Contaminants. Continue to review projects for potential generation of toxic air contaminants at the time of approval and confer with Bay Area Air Quality Management District on controls needed if impacts are uncertain. ES-4.1.2: Dust Control. Continue to require water application to non-polluting dust control measures during demolition and the duration of the construction period. ES-4.1.3: Planning. Ensure that land use and transportation plans support air quality goals. POLICY ES-4.2: EXISTING DEVELOPMENT Minimize the air quality impacts of existing development. STRATEGIES: ES-4.2.1: Public Education Program. Establish a citywide public education program providing information on ways to reduce and control emissions; and continue to provide information about alternative commutes, carpooling and restricting exacerbating activities on “Spare the Air” high-emissions days. AIR QUALITY The City seeks to identify ways to improve air quality in order to reduce emissions and improve overall community health. GOAL ES-4 Maintain healthy air quality levels ES-19 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) ES-4.2.2: Home Occupations. Review and consider expanding the allowable home-based businesses in residentially zoned properties to reduce the need to commute to work. ES-4.2.3: Tree Planting in Private Development. Review and enhance the City’s tree planting and landscaping program and requirements for private development to reduce air pollution levels. ES-4.2.4: Fuel-efficient Vehicles and Use. Prioritize the purchase, replacement and ongoing use of fuel-efficient and low polluting City fleet vehicles. Update applicable policies and programs to require life cycle cost analyses and include alternative fueling infrastructure review and related funding allocations. Update the Vehicle Use Policy and pursue fleet management best practices to support fuel conservation, scheduled maintenance and fleet fuel tracking. Pursue available grant funding to offset the cost of implementing these programs. ES-4.2.5: Point Sources of Emissions. Continue to seek the cooperation of the BAAQMD to monitor emissions from identified point sources that impact the community. In addition, for sources not within the regulatory jurisdiction of the City, seek cooperation from the applicable regulatory authority to encourage reduction of emissions and dust from the point source. POLICY ES-4.3: USE OF OPEN FIRES AND FIREPLACES Discourage high pollution fireplace use. STRATEGIES: ES-4.3.1: Education. Continue to make BAAQMD literature on reducing pollution from fireplace use available. ES-4.3.2: Fireplaces. Continue to prohibit new wood-burning fireplaces, except EPA certified wood stoves as allowed by the Building Code. ES-20 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY ES-5.1: URBAN ECOSYSTEM Manage the public and private development to ensure the protection and enhancement of its urban ecosystem. STRATEGIES: ES-5.1.1: Landscaping. Ensure that the City’s tree planting, landscaping and open space policies enhance the urban ecosystem by encouraging medians, pedestrian- crossing curb-extensions planting that is native, drought-tolerant, treats stormwater and enhances urban plant, aquatic and animal resources in both, private and public development. ES-5.1.2: Built Environment. Ensure that sustainable landscaping design is incorporated in the development of City facilities, parks and private projects with the inclusion of measures such as tree protection, stormwater treatment and planting of native, drought tolerant landscaping that is beneficial to the environment. POLICY ES-5.2: DEVELOPMENT NEAR SENSITIVE AREAS Encourage the clustering of new development away from sensitive areas such as riparian corridors, wildlife habitat and corridors, public open space preserves and ridgelines. New developments in these areas must have a harmonious landscaping plan approved prior to development. URBAN AND RURAL ECOSYSTEMS Protecting Cupertino’s natural and urban ecosystems supports the City commitment to protect ecosystems and improve sustainability. GOAL ES-5 Protect the city’s urban and rural ecosystems ES-21 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) STRATEGY: ES-5.2.1: Riparian Corridor Protection. Require the protection of riparian corridors through the development approval process. POLICY ES-5.3: LANDSCAPING IN AND NEAR NATURAL VEGETATION Preserve and enhance existing natural vegetation, landscape features and open space when new development is proposed within existing natural areas. When development is proposed near natural vegetation, encourage the landscaping to be consistent with the palate of vegetation found in the natural vegetation. STRATEGIES: ES-5.3.1: Native Plants. Continue to emphasize the planting of native, drought tolerant, pest resistant, non-invasive, climate appropriate plants and ground covers, particularly for erosion control and to prevent disturbance of the natural terrain ES-5.3.2: Hillsides. Minimize lawn area in the hillsides. POLICY ES-5.4: HILLSIDE WILDLIFE MIGRATION Confine fencing on hillside property to the area around a building, rather than around an entire site, to allow for migration of wild animals. POLICY ES-5.5: RECREATION AND NATURAL VEGETATION Limit recreation in natural areas to activities compatible and appropriate with preserving natural vegetation, such as hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking and camping. POLICY ES-5.6: RECREATION AND WILDLIFE Provide open space linkages within and between properties for both recreational and wildlife activities, most specifically for the benefit of wildlife that is threatened, endangered or designated as species of special concern. STRATEGIES: ES-5.6.1: Creek and Water Course Identification. Require identification of creeks, water courses and riparian areas on site plans and require that they be protected from adjacent development. ES-5.6.2: Trail Easements. Consider requiring easements for trail linkages if analysis determines that they are needed. ES-22 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY ES-6.1: MINERAL RESOURCE AREAS Cooperatively work with Santa Clara County to ensure that plans for restoration and mining operations at Lehigh Hanson and Stevens Creek quarries consider environmental impacts and mitigations. STRATEGIES: ES-6.1.1: Public Participation. Encourage Santa Clara County to engage with the affected neighborhoods when considering changes to restoration plans and mineral extraction activity. ES-6.1.2: Recreation in Depleted Mining Areas. Consider designating abandoned quarries for passive recreation to enhance plant and wildlife habitat and rehabilitate the land. MINERAL RESOURCES The City seeks to minimize the impacts of mineral resource operations on the community. GOAL ES-6 Minimize impacts of available mineral resources ES-23 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY ES-7.1: NATURAL WATER BODIES AND DRAINAGE SYSTEMS In public and private development, use Low Impact Development (LID) principles to manage stormwater by mimicking natural hydrology, minimizing grading and protecting or restoring natural drainage systems. STRATEGIES: ES-7.1.1: Development Plans. Continue to require topographical information; identification of creeks, streams and drainage areas; and grading plans for both public and private development proposals to ensure protection and efficient use of water resources. POLICY ES-7.2: REDUCTION OF IMPERVIOUS SURFACES Minimize stormwater runoff and erosion impacts resulting from development and use low impact development (LID) designs to treat stormwater or recharge groundwater STRATEGIES: ES-7.2.1: Lot Coverage. Consider updating lot coverage requirements to include paved surfaces such as driveways and on- grade impervious patios to incentivize the construction of pervious surfaces. ES-7.2.2: Pervious Walkways and Driveways. Encourage the use of pervious materials for walkways and driveways. If used on public or quasi-public property, mobility and access for the disabled should take precedence. WATER The City seeks to ensure that current and future water supplies are adequate by reducing water demand and protecting sources of water. GOAL ES-7 Ensure protection and efficient use of all water resources ES-24 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) ES-7.2.3: Maximize Infiltration. Minimize impervious surface areas, and maximize on-site filtration and the use of on-site retention facilities. POLICY ES-7.3: POLLUTION AND FLOW IMPACTS Ensure that surface and groundwater quality impacts are reduced through development review and voluntary efforts. STRATEGIES: ES-7.3.1: Development Review. Require LID designs such as vegetated stormwater treatment systems and green infrastructure to mitigate pollutant loads and flows. ES-7.3.2: Creek Clean Up. Encourage volunteer organizations to help clean creek beds to reduce pollution and help return waterways to their natural state. POLICY ES-7.4: WATERSHED BASED PLANNING Review long-term plans and development projects to ensure good stewardship of watersheds. STRATEGIES: ES-7.4.1: Storm Drainage Master Plan. Develop and maintain a Storm Drainage Master Plan which identifies facilities needed to prevent “10-year” event street flooding and “100-year” event structure flooding and integrate green infrastructure to meet water quality protection needs in a cost effective manner. ES-7.4.2: Watershed Management Plans. Work with other agencies to develop broader Watershed Management Plans to model and control the City’s hydrology. ES-7.4.3: Development. Review development plans to ensure that projects are examined in the context of impacts on the entire watershed, in order to comply with the City’s non-point source Municipal Regional Permit. POLICY ES-7.5: GROUNDWATER RECHARGE SITES Support the Santa Clara Valley Water District efforts to find and develop groundwater recharge sites within Cupertino and provide public recreation where possible. POLICY ES-7.6: OTHER WATER SOURCES Encourage the research of other water sources, including water reclamation. ES-25 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY ES-7.7: INDUSTRIAL WATER RECYCLING Encourage industrial projects, in cooperation with the Cupertino Sanitary District, to have long-term conservation measures, including recycling equipment for manufacturing and water supplies in the plant. POLICY ES-7.8: NATURAL WATER COURSES Retain and restore creek beds, riparian corridors, watercourses and associated vegetation in their natural state to protect wildlife habitat and recreation potential and assist in groundwater percolation. Encourage land acquisition or dedication of such areas. STRATEGY: ES-7.8.1: Inter-Agency Coordination. Work with the Santa Clara Valley Water District and other relevant regional agencies to enhance riparian corridors and provide adequate flood control by use of flow increase mitigation measures, such as hydromodification controls as established by the Municipal Regional Permit. POLICY ES-7.9: INTER-AGENCY COORDINATION FOR WATER CONSERVATION Continue to coordinate citywide water conservation and regional water supply problem solving efforts with the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD), San Jose Water Company and California Water Company. STRATEGY: ES-7.9.1: Water Conservation Measures. Implement water conservation measures and encourage the implementation of voluntary water conservation measures from the City’s water retailers and SCVWD. POLICY ES-7.10: PUBLIC EDUCATION REGARDING RESOURCE CONSERVATION Provide public information regarding resource conservation. STRATEGIES: ES-7.10.1: Outreach. Continue to send educational information and notices to households and businesses with water prohibitions, water allocations and conservation tips. Continue to offer featured articles in the Cupertino Scene and Cupertino Courier. Consider providing Public Service Announcements on the City’s Channel and Cupertino Radio. ES-26 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) ES-7.10.2: Demonstration Gardens. Consider including water-wise demonstration gardens in some parks where feasible as they are re- landscaped or improved using drought tolerant native and non-invasive, and non-native plants. POLICY ES-7.11: WATER CONSERVATION AND DEMAND REDUCTION MEASURES Promote efficient use of water throughout the City in order to meet State and regional water use reduction targets. STRATEGIES: ES-7.11.1: Urban Water Management Plan. Collaborate with water retailers serving the City in the preparation of their Urban Water Management Plan, including water conservation strategies and programs. ES-7.11.2: Water Conservation Standards. Comply with State water conservation standards by either adopting the State standards or alternate standards that are equally efficient. ES-7.11.3: Recycled Water System. Continue to work with water retailers to promote and expand the availability of recycled water in the City for public and private use. ES-7.11.4: Recycled Water in Projects. Encourage and promote the use of recycled water in public and private buildings, open space and streetscape planting. ES-7.11.5: On-site Recycled Water. Encourage on-site water recycling including rainwater harvesting and gray water use. ES-7.11.6: Water Conservation Programs. Benchmark and continue to track the City’s public and private municipal water use to ensure ongoing accountability and as a means of informing prioritization of future agency water conservation projects. ES-7.11.7: Green Business Certification and Water Conservation. Continue to support the City’s Green Business Certification goals of long- term water conservation within City facilities, vegetated stormwater infiltration systems, parks and medians, including installation of low-flow toilets and showers, parks, installation of automatic shut-off valves in lavatories and sinks and water efficient outdoor irrigation. ES-27 CHAPTER 6: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK ES-28 health and safety 7 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HS-2 Community health and public safety responsibilities have to evolve to address the community’s growth and changing needs. The City is committed to maintaining a high level of preparedness to protect the community from risks to life, property and the environment associated with both natural and human- caused disasters and hazards. In the future, more emphasis will be placed on sustainable approaches to community health and safety, including crime and fire prevention through design, improved use of technology, management of hazardous materials and improved disaster planning. This Element includes goals, policies and strategies that address the potential risks associated with these hazards, actions the City can take to reduce these risks, and ways the City and community can take more sustainable approaches for preventing or minimizing injuries to life and damages to property. Introduction CONTENTS: HS-2 Introduction HS-3 Context Emergency Preparedness Fire Safety Public Safety Hazardous Materials Electromagnetic Fields Geologic and Seismic Hazards Flood Hazards Noise HS-24 Looking Forward HS-25 Goals and Policies Regional Coordination Emergency Preparedness Fire Safety Public Safety Geologic Seismic Hazards Hazardous Materials Flooding Noise CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Emergencies can severely impact the health of a community and a city or agency’s ability to provide needed services. Emergencies can include natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods and forest fires, or others events such as infrastructure disruptions, security incidents or hazardous spills. Emergency preparedness includes activities that are undertaken before an emergency occurs so there is an effective and coordinated response. Emergency preparedness requires the integration of the following elements into each of the City’s functions: emergency planning, coordination, mitigation, training and public education. The City, its contributing agencies, and the community are partners in ensuring that emergency planning is effectively implemented. CUPERTINO EMERGENCY PLAN State law requires cities to prepare an emergency plan in order to effectively respond to natural or human-caused disasters that threaten lives, the natural environment or property. The Cupertino Emergency Plan establishes an organizational framework to enable the City to manage its emergency response activities and to coordinate with County, State and Federal agencies. The Emergency Plan was prepared in accordance with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and is used in conjunction with the State Emergency Plan, the Santa Clara Operational Disaster Response and Recovery Area Interim Agreement, Santa Clara County Emergency Plan, as well as plans and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) of contract agencies and special districts. Support personnel such as City staff, special districts and volunteer groups are trained to perform specific functions in the Emergency Operations Center. The plan is reviewed annually and tested through periodic emergency disaster drills. HS-3 CONTEXT CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER The City’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is located on the first floor of City Hall, with an alternative location in the Service Center on Mary Avenue. The EOC has the ability to be fully functional within 30 minutes of activation. Capabilities include emergency backup power, computer network and internet access, and telephone and radio communications to City and County sites. While the staffing and duties are actively managed through the Emergency Plan, there may be additional physical and seismic improvements required to City Hall to ensure that it can continue to meet the requirements of an EOC. Additional communication support is provided by volunteers from Cupertino Amateur Radio Emergency Service (CARES). CARES volunteers coordinate extensive citywide communications capabilities, including helping to connect neighbors, public safety officials, special districts, City and County Departments. DISASTER SERVICE WORKERS During emergencies, all City employees are designated Disaster Service Workers under Section 3100 of the California Government Code. They are required to remain at work as long as they are needed, and receive specific training in personal and home preparedness, First Aid, CPR, NIMS and Terrorism Awareness. Volunteer groups also play an important role in the City’s Emergency Plan. The City is part of a countywide volunteer services plan and is working with the Emergency Volunteer Center, Blockleaders, and Neighborhood Watch to develop a plan for coordinating and deploying volunteers. Citizen Corps members (CARES, CERT and MRC) continue to receive appropriate training and equipment to rapidly respond throughout the City and augment professional first responders. Unregistered and untrained volunteers may be utilized and trained, as needed during a disaster. HS-4 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) FIRE SAFETY Fire fighting and emergency medical services are provided to the City by the Santa Clara County Fire Department (SCCFD). SCCFD is a full service department that provides similar services to seven other West Valley cities and adjacent county areas. Mutual aid agreements with the neighboring jurisdictions augment SCCFD’s fire response capabilities. In addition to fire protection, SCCFD also conducts fire prevention inspections and educational programs, including those on Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid certification. Due to Cupertino’s geographical location, it is exposed to hazards from both wildland and urban fires. There are approximately 16 square miles of hillsides included in and around the boundary of the city. In 2009, based on vegetation data, topography and potential fire behavior, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) identified approximately three acres of the City to be in the High and Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zone. The City adopted this area as its Wildand-Urban Interface Fire Area (WUIFA). Properties in the WUIFA are subject to building and property maintenance standards intended to prevent and manage community safety due to brush and forest fires (Figure HS-1). Planning for such areas also requires attention to the availability of access roads and water for firefighting and evacuation efforts. Santa Clara County lists the Montebello Road/Stevens Canyon area as the fourth highest risk in the county. The road linking Montebello and the Palo Alto Sphere of Influence to the bottom of Stevens Canyon has been improved to acceptable standards for a fire access road. A fire trail extends from Skyline Boulevard on Charcoal Road to Stevens Canyon. The City requires that all emergency roads be constructed with an all weather surface. It also requires a private emergency access connection between public streets within Lindy Canyon and Regnart Canyon areas. Presently, there are no water systems serving the Montebello Road and upper Stevens Canyon area, with the exception of Stevens Creek itself. Because there is no water service to these areas, the County requires homes to provide individual water tanks and fire sprinkler systems (Figure HS-2). HS-5 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HS-6 The urbanized portions of Cupertino are not exposed to a high risk of fire. The City is served by a well-managed fire protection service as well as a fire prevention program. Buildings in the City are relatively new and there is a strong code enforcement program, an adequate water supply and a well- maintained delivery system. State, regional and local standards also ensure that new buildings and facilities adequately address issues of fire safety, access, evacuation and fire-fighting requirements. Response time is one metric for measuring level of service for fighting fire and emergency services. It is the policy of SCCFD to respond to 90 percent of emergency calls not requiring a paramedic in under seven minutes. For situations where emergency medical services are required, it is the policy that paramedics arrive in less than seven minutes at least 90 percent of the time. An increase in calls for fire service and traffic congestion may affect SCCFD’s critical response time, and the District may need to adjust or expand staff, and equipment in areas of high service demand in the future. Figure HS-3 shows the location of fire stations and their service areas in Cupertino. STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS The City regulates building construction and site planning through the Uniform Fire Code and the California Building Code. The City and the SCCFD inspect commercial and industrial buildings for compliance with the applicable codes. In addition, the County Fire Marshal and the Fire Department regulate activities, including weed abatement and brush clearance, in the Wildland Urban Interface Fire Area (WUFIA). PUBLIC SAFETY The City, and a number of surrounding jurisdictions, contracts with the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office, West Valley Division, for law enforcement services. Law enforcement services include police patrols, criminal investigations, traffic enforcement, accident investigation and tactical teams. The City’s commitment to public safety encompasses two broad areas of responsibilities: (1) provide public safety services and the planning necessary for the prevention of crime; and (2) plan for a safe environment in which the public is not exposed to unnecessary risks to life and property. CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) 0 2,100 4,200 6,3001,050 Feet Legend UrbanWildlandInterfaceFOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAUAVEStevens Creek Reservoir Santa Clara SunnyvaleLos Altos San Jose Saratoga 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend Unincorporated Areas within Urban Service Area City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Urban Wildland Interface NLU-1FIGURE HS-1 WILDLAND-URBAN INTERFACE AREA (WUIFA) HS-7 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos San Jose Water Company California WaterCupertino Municipal Water System (Leased to San Jose Water Company) 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Water Company Service Areas N LU-1 FIGURE HS-2 WATER SERVICE HS-8 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Seven Springs Fire Station Cupertino Fire Station Monta Vista Fire Station Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas 3/4 Mile Serivce Area 1-1/2 Miles Service Area 2 Miles Service Area NLU-1FIGURE HS-3 FIRE SERVICE HS-9 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HS-10 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Hazardous materials are a part of our everyday life in the form of batteries, light bulbs, and household chemicals such as pesticides, motor oil, cleaners and paints. They are also used in many commercial and industrial operations. The use, storage and disposal of hazardous materials, including management of contaminated soils and groundwater, is regulated by Federal, State and local laws. The City has adopted a Hazardous Materials Storage Ordinance that regulates the storage of these materials in solid and liquid form. The City’s Regulation of Facilities Where Materials Which Are Or May Become Toxic Gases Are Found Ordinance regulates the storage of hazardous materials in gaseous form. Figure HS-4 identifies potential sites within the city that may contain hazardous materials. Since 1990, State law has required that hazardous waste be properly disposed of in approved hazardous waste treatment or disposal facilities. To accomplish this, new treatment methods and facilities have been developed and approved to pre-treat hazardous waste before its final disposal. Under authority of the 1986 “Tanner” Bill (AB 2948), Cupertino, along with 13 other cities, joined the County to develop a comprehensive and coordinated planning approach to hazardous waste disposal. In 1990, a countywide Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Program was created. In order to supplement the County HHW Program and make the collection of HHW more convenient for residents, the City currently provides a door-to-door hazardous waste retrieval service through its solid waste franchise agreement. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS Electromagnetic fields are a physical field produced by electrically charged objects, such has high transmission power lines. The potential health effects of the very low frequency EMFs surrounding power lines and electrical devices are the subject of on-going research and a significant amount of public debate. The US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has issued some cautionary advisories but stresses that the data is currently too limited to draw good conclusions. Currently, electromagnetic fields from transmission lines, electrical and wireless facilities, and appliances are heavily regulated through Federal and State requirements. CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir SunnyvaleLos Altos Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Potential Sites NLU-1FIGURE HS-4 POTENTIAL HAZARDOUS SITES HS-11 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Horizontally Shifted Block Horizontal Offset of the Ground Surface A. San Andreas Fault B. Sargent - Berrocal Fault Fault Type: R ight Lateral (Strike-Slip) Fault Displacement: Horizontal Fault Type: T hrust (Dip-Slip) Fault Displacement: V ertical Vertically Elevated Block Faults within the Cupertino planning area are characterized by (A) Horizontal and (B) Vertical displace- ments. GEOLOGIC AND SEISMIC HAZARDS Cupertino is located in the seismically active San Francisco Bay region, which has several active seismic faults. The San Andreas fault, one of the longest and most active faults in the world, is located west of Cupertino. Two additional faults closely associated with the San Andreas fault, the Sargent-Berrocal and Monta Vista-Shannon fault systems, also cross the western portion of the city. Movement on the San Andreas fault is predominantly right-lateral strike-slip, where the earth ruptures in a horizontal fashion, with the opposite sides of the fault moving to the right with respect to each other. Movement on the Sargent- Berrocal and Monta Vista-Shannon faults is more variable in style. Both of these faults are characterized by “thrust” faulting, where a significant amount of vertical “up-down” (so called dip-slip) displacement occurs on an inclined plane, and one side of the fault is elevated (i.e., thrust over) the other side. Primary geologic hazards in Cupertino are related to landslides and seismic impacts. Seismically induced ground shaking, surface fault rupture, and various forms of earthquake-triggered ground failure are anticipated within the city during large earthquakes. These geologic hazards present potential impacts to property and public safety. Tables HS-1 through HS-4 briefly explain seismic hazards, magnitude and occurrence, acceptable exposure rise, and technical investigations required based on acceptable risk. Figure HS-5 identifies the areas in Cupertino susceptible to the greatest risk. Also see Technical Appendix E for additional information on geologic and seismic hazards and risks. Following the 1983 Coalinga and 1994 Northridge earthquakes, scientists became increasingly aware of earthquakes generated by faults not previously observed at the earth’s surface. These types of faults are called “blind faults,” and represent a type of thrust fault that does not rupture completely to the surface. It is possible that one or more “blind faults” are present in the Monta Vista-Shannon fault system. HS-12 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU Stevens Creek Reservoir Sant a Clara County Sa n t a C r uz County Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Fault Rupture Slope Instability Hillside Inundation / Liquefaction Valley Floor Known Fault Inferred Fault Concealed Fault Urban Service Area Boundary Boundary Agreement LineFaul t Sa n A n d r e a s F a u l t Ber roca l FaultMont a V i s t a F F F F F F H L L L LL L L L H H H V V V V V S S 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend NLU-1FIGURE HS-5 GEOLOGIC AND SEISMIC HAZARDS HS-13 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table HS-1 Explanations of Geologic and Seismic Hazards Zone Description (F)– Fault Rupture Area of potential surface fault rupture hazard within 300 feet east and 600 feet west of the Monta Vista and Berrocal faults, and within 600 feet of the San Andreas fault. (S)– Slope Instability Area includes all recognized landslide deposits, and steep walls of Stevens Creek canyon, with a moderate to high landslide potential under static or seismic conditions. Area also reflects the mapped zone of potential earthquake-induced landsliding prepared by the California Geological Survey (2002). (H)– Hillside Area contains moderate to steep slope conditions not included in the above categories, with an unde- termined potential for slope instability. (L)– Liquefaction / Inundation Area where local geological, geotechnical and groundwater conditions indicate a potential for lique- faction under seismic conditions. Much of this area also has the potential for periodic flood inundation. The Liquefaction/Inundation Zone is stippled where covered by an overlaying Fault Zone. (V)– Valley Area includes all relatively level valley floor terrain not included in the above categories with relatively low levels of geologic hazard risk. Table HS-2 Maximum Earthquake Magnitudes and Recurrence Intervals Causative Faults Distance from De Anza/SCB Intersection Maximum Historic Moment Magnitude Maximum Probable Moment Magnitude Est. Recurrence Interval of Max. Prob. Earthquake San Andreas System San Andreas 5.5 miles 7.9 7.9 220 years Hayward (South)10 miles 7.0 7.0 236 years Calveras (Central)14 miles 6.3 7.0 374 years Sargent-Berrocal System Sargent-Berrocal 3.5 miles 3.7-5.0 6.8 330 years Monta Vista- Shannon 2 miles 2.0-3.0 6.8 2400 years HS-14 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table HS-3 Acceptable Exposure to Risk Related to Various Land Uses Acceptable Exposure to Risk Land Use Group Extra Project Cost to Reduce Risk to Acceptable Level Extremely Low Group 1 Vulnerable structures (nuclear reactors, large dams, plants manufacturing/ stor- ing hazardous materials) As required for maximum attainable safety Group 2 Vital public utilities (electrical trans- mission interties/substations, regional water pipelines, treatment plants, gas mains) Design as needed to remain functional after max. prob. earthquake on local faults Group 3 Communication/transportation (airports, telephones, bridges, freeways, evac. routes) 5% to 25% of project cost Small water retention structures Design as needed to remain functional after max. prob earthquake on local faults Emergency Centers (hospitals, fire/ police stations, post-earthquake aide stations, schools, City Hall and Service Center, De Anza College) Group 4 Involuntary occupancy facilities (schools, prisons, convalescent and nursing homes)Design as needed to remain functional after max. prob. earthquake on local faultsHigh occupancy buildings (theaters, hotels, large office/apartment bldgs.) Moderately Low Group 5 Public utilities (electrical feeder routes, water supply turnout lines, sewage lines) 5% to 25% of project cost Facilities important to local economy Design to minimize injury, loss of life during maximum probable earthquake on local faults; need not design to remain functional Ordinary Risk Level Group 6 Minor transportation (arterials and park- ways) 2% of project cost; to 10% project cost in extreme cases Low-moderate occupancy buildings (small apartment bldgs., single-fam. resid., motels, small commercial/office bldgs.) Group 7 Very low occupancy buildings Design to resist minor earthquakes (ware- houses, farm structures) w/o damage; resist mod. Earthquakes w/o struc. damage,with some nonstruct. damage; resist major earth- quake (max. prob. on local faults w/o collapse, allowing some struc. & non-struc. damage Open space and recreation (farm land, landfills, wildlife areas) HS-15 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table HS-4 Technical Investigations Required based on Acceptable Risk Land Use Activity Hazard Map Symbol FSH LV Evaluation Required Evaluation Required Groups 1 to 4 UBC UBC Soils Soils Geology Seismic Hazard Seismic Hazard Groups 5 to 7 UBC UBC Soils Geology Descriptions of Technical Evaluations: UBC Current, adopted version of the California Building Code Soils Soils and foundation investigation to determine ability of local soil conditions to support structures Geology Determine subsidence potential, faulting hazard, slope stability (See Geologic Map for additional detail) Seismic Detailed Soils/Structural evaluation to certify adequacy Hazard of normal UBC earthquake regulations or to recommend more stringent measures HS-16 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) FLOOD HAZARDS The City participates in the Community Rating System (CRS) program which is a voluntary incentive program that recognizes and encourages community floodplain management activities that exceed minimum NFIP requirements. Flood insurance premium rates for property owners within the city may be discounted to reflect the reduced flood risk resulting from community actions meeting the three goals of the CRS, which are to: (1) reduce flood damage to insurable property; (2) strengthen and support the insurance aspects of the NFIP; and (3) encourage a comprehensive approach to floodplain management. Floods are surface hydrological hazards that can have a significant, and sometimes, long lasting effect on a community. Floods can originate from various sources including heavy rainstorms, landslides and/or dam failure. Sediment deposits also increase flood risks because they clog the drainage system and may induce upstream flooding. Rain related floods are the most common type of floods, and usually occur during periods of extended heavy rainfall. The largest body of water within the area is the Stevens Creek Reservoir. Stevens Creek Dam meets current dam safety standards and the probability of its failure is minimal (Figure HS-6). The watersheds in the Santa Cruz Mountain Range feed into four major streambeds that traverse the City: Permanente Creek, Stevens Creek, Regnart Creek, and Calabazas Creek (Figure HS-7). Stevens Creek and its streamside are among the natural elements that have the most influence on Cupertino’s character. These creeks collect surface runoff and channel it to the Bay. However, they also pose potential flooding risks if water levels exceed the top of bank as a result of heavy runoff. The City and the Santa Clara Valley Water District are actively involved in programs to minimize the risk of flooding. The City developed an approach to land use for the non-urbanized flood plain of Stevens Creek south of Stevens Creek Boulevard in the Land Use Element. This ensures the preservation of the 100-year flood plain and the protection of the riparian corridor along this portion of Stevens Creek. The City and the Water District also developed a flood management program for the flood plain of Stevens Creek between Interstate 280 and Stevens Creek Boulevard while preserving the natural environment of Stevens Creek. Structural improvements, while not preferred, may be necessary, to protect properties from a 100-year flood. HS-17 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Sunnyvale Los Altos Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Note: Flood inundation area for failure of Stevens Creek Reservoir is based upon maximum 3700 acre feet storage capacity.StevensCreek0 +30 Min. Voss Ave. Pond 8-10 Acre Feet Cristo Rey Tank 2 Mil. Gal. Mercedes Tanks (2) 2 Mil. Gal. 12.2 Acre Feet 4 Mil. Gal. Regnart Canyon Tank 0.16 Mil. Gal. Regnart Heights Tank 0.14 Mil. Gal. Rainbows End Tank 0.30 Mil. Gal. Regnart Tanks 20 Mil. Gal. Stevens Creek Reservoir 3700 Acre Feet 1 Bil. 200 Mil. Gal 0 +15 Min. Mann Drive Tank 1 Mil. Gal. Proposed Tank 61.3 Acre Feet 20 Mil. Gal.FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Flood Limit Natural or Man-Made Water Course N LU-1 FIGURE HS-6 FACILITY FAILURE HS-18 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040)FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir SunnyvaleLos Altos Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Note: Detailed Maps of 100-Year Flood Event Are Available at City HallCalabazasCreekCreekRegnart100-Year Flood Contained In Channel 100-Year Flood Contained In ChannelPermanenteCreekStevensCreek 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Flood Limit Natural or Man-Made Water Course Highway Major Road NLU-1FIGURE HS-7 100-YEAR FLOOD HS-19 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) NOISE The noise environment is an accumulation of many different sources, ranging from human voices to major sources such as freeway traffic. The degree to which noise becomes an annoyance depends on a variety of factors including noise level, time of day, background sounds, and surrounding land use. COMMUNITY NOISE FUNDAMENTALS The three elements of community noise are noise level, noise spectrum, and variation in noise level with time. Noise level is measured in decibels (dB). Noise is composed of various frequencies within a noise spectrum that define the character of the noise. Since human hearing is more sensitive to the higher speech frequencies, the A-weighted frequency network is applied, in accordance with national and international standards, to adjust the measured noise level to more closely relate to human perception of loudness. Noise environments have different characteristics that vary with duration and time of day; for instance a freeway may emit a fairly constant noise level for long periods while an airport may emit many short-term high level noise events punctuated by extended periods of quiet. To provide a standard measure for community noise exposure that takes into account the time-varying characteristics, the State of California adopted the Community Noise Equivalent Level (CNEL) as the standard metric. The CNEL is a 24-hour energy average metric that penalizes evening and nighttime noise, and provides a uniform measure for time-varying noise environments. HS-20 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) NOISE ENVIRONMENT The noise environment can generally be divided into two categories: transportation-related and non-transportation related noise. Traffic noise is the greatest contributor to noise pollution in Cupertino and one of the most difficult to control through local effort. Two major freeways (Interstate 280 and Highway 85) and four major corridors (Stevens Creek Boulevard, De Anza Boulevard, Homestead Road, and Foothill Boulevard ) cross Cupertino. These roadways are utilized not only by local residents and employees, but also by commuters to destinations beyond Cupertino. Heavy-duty trucking operations to and from the Hanson Permanente Cement Plant and Stevens Creek Quarry located in the western foothills near Stevens Creek Boulevard and Foothill Boulevard are also a significant transportation-related noise contributor. Cupertino receives some aircraft noise from facilities within the region including San Jose International Airport, Moffett Federal Airfield and Palo Alto Airport; however, the Cupertino city limit does not fall within the identified noise contours of any airport. One railroad line passes through the Monta Vista neighborhood and connects with the Hanson Permanente Cement Plant. This freight railway operates at very low frequencies, with approximately three train trips in each direction per week, usually during the daytime or early evening. Non-transportation noise varies from stationary equipment (e.g., air conditioning units) to construction activity. Regulation to minimize excessive noise from non- transportation sources includes compliance with the City’s noise standards that limit certain noise-generating activity during evening and early morning, when ambient noise levels tend to be lower. Advancements in technology to muffle sound also reduce noise from construction equipment and stationary equipment such as compressors and generators. HS-21 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LAND USE COMPATIBILITY The Cupertino Municipal Code, Title 10, outlines the maximum noise levels on receiving properties based upon land use types (Figure HS-8). Land use deci- sions and the development review process play a large role in minimizing noise impacts on sensitive land uses. Noise compatibility may be achieved by avoiding the location of conflicting land uses adjacent to one another and incorporating buffers and noise control techniques including setbacks, landscaping, building transitions, site design, and building construction techniques. Selection of the appropriate noise control technique will vary depending on the level of noise that needs to be reduced as well as the location and intended land use. HS-22 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Community Noise ExposureLand Use Category (Ldn or CNEL, dB) 55 60 65 70 75 80 Residential - Multi Family Transient Lodging (Motels, Hotels) Schools, Libraries, Churches, Hospitals, Nursing Homes Auditoriums, Concert Halls, Amphitheaters Sports Arena, Outdoor Spectator Sports Playgrounds, Neighborhood Parks Golf Courses, Riding Stables, Water Recreation, Cemeteries Office Buildings, Commercial and Professional Centers Industrial, Manufacturing, Utilities, Agriculture Residential - Low Density (Single Family, Duplex, Mobile Homes) Normally Acceptable Specified land use is satisfactory, based upon the assumption that any buildings involved are of normal conventional construction, without any special noise insulation requirements. Conditionally Acceptable New construction or development should be undertaken only after a detailed analysis of the noise reduction requirements is made and needed noise reduction features included in the design. Conventional construction, but with closed windows and fresh air supply systems or air conditioning will normally suffice. Normally Unacceptable New construction or development should generally be discouraged. If new construction or development does proceed, a detailed analysis of the noise reduction requirements must be made and needed noise insulation features included in the design. Clearly Unacceptable New construction or development should generally not be undertaken.LU-1FIGURE HS-8 LAND USE COMPATIBILITY FOR COMMUNITY NOISE ENVIRONMENTS HS-23 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LOOKING FORWARD As Cupertino’s resident and employee population grows, the City must identify ways to ensure public safety and support the community’s high quality of life. Innovative site design and construction techniques are needed to reduce noise in developments near major corridors and where uses are mixed to ensure compatibility. Fire protection and public safety should be enhanced in a manner that provides a high quality of service while continuing to be fiscally responsible. The following are ways the City will address key challenges and opportunities facing Cupertino: NOISE. As State, regional and local policies encourage mixed-use development near corridors, the City should look to ways to reduce noise impacts on residences near and in such developments through site design, landscaping and construction techniques. Additionally, the City should review locations and site design for sensitive uses including schools, childcare facilities and hospitals to ensure that they are not negatively impacted by noise. PROJECT DESIGN AND OPERATIONS. Measures such as project and building design, emergency access, operations and maintenance of property, can help developments promote public and fire safety. Such measures will also allow the providers to maintain a high service level, while accommodating future growth. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION. The City and service providers should enhance community participation through new and existing programs such as neighborhood watch, emergency preparedness and school programs. SHARED RESOURCES. The City can enhance emergency, fire safety and public safety services by coordinating programs with service providers and neighboring cities through shared services, mutual aid and agreements. 1 2 3 4 HS-24 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of Cupertino GOAL HS-1 Reduce hazard risks through regional coordination and mitigation planning POLICY HS-1.1: REGIONAL HAZARD RISK REDUCTION PLANNING Coordinate with Santa Clara County and local agencies to implement the Multi-Jurisdictional Local Hazard Mitigation Plan (LHMP) for Santa Clara County. STRATEGIES: HS-1.1.1. Monitoring and Budgeting. Monitor and evaluate the success of the LHMP, including local strategies provided in the Cupertino Annex (Section 11). Working with Santa Clara County, ensure that strategies are prioritized and implemented through the Capital Improvement Program and provide adequate budget for on-going programs and department operations. HS-1.1.2. Mitigation Incorporation. Ensure that mitigation actions identified in the LHMP are being incorporated into upcoming City sponsored projects, where appropriate. HS-1.1.3. Hazard Mitigation Plan Amendments and Updates. Support Santa Clara County in its role as the lead agency that prepares and updates the Local Hazard Mitigation Plan. REGIONAL COORDINATION The City seeks to coordinate its local requirements and emergency planning efforts with Federal, State and regional resources to ensure a consistent, integrated and efficient approach to emergency planning. HS-25 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY HS-1.2: SEA LEVEL RISE PROTECTION Ensure all areas in Cupertino are adequately protected for the anticipated effects of sea level rise. STRATEGIES: HS-1.2.1. Monitor Rising Sea Level. Regularly coordinate with regional, state, and federal agencies on rising sea levels in the San Francisco Bay and major tributaries to determine if additional adaptation strategies should be implemented to address flooding hazards. This includes monitoring FEMA flood map updates to identify areas in the city susceptible to sea level rise, addressing changes to state and regional sea and bay level rise estimates, and coordinating with adjacent municipalities on flood control improvements as appropriate. HS-1.2.2. Flood Insurance Rate Maps. Provide to the public, as available, up-to-date Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) that identify rising sea levels and changing flood conditions. HS-26 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL HS-2 Ensure a high level of emergency preparedness for natural and human- caused disasters POLICY HS-2.1: PROMOTE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Distribute multi-hazard emergency preparedness information for all threats identified in the emergency plan. Information will be provided through Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), First Aid and Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training, lectures and seminars on emergency preparedness, publication of monthly safety articles in the Cupertino Scene, posting of information on the Emergency Preparedness website and coordination of video and printed information at the library. POLICY HS-2.2: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS AND TRAINING Ensure ongoing training of identified City staff on their functions/ responsibilities in the EOC and in disaster preparedness, first aid and CPR. STRATEGIES: HS-2.2.1: Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Review options to provide functional and seismic upgrades to the EOC facility at City Hall or explore alternative locations for the EOC. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS The City seeks to focus on planning and education to prepare and enlist the community in the management of disasters and emergencies. HS-27 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HS-2.2.2: Employee Training. Conduct regular exercises and participate in regional exercises to ensure that employees are adequately trained. POLICY HS-2.3: VOLUNTEER GROUPS Continue to encourage the ongoing use of volunteer groups to augment emergency services, and clearly define responsibilities during a local emergency. STRATEGIES: HS-2.3.1: Cupertino Citizens Corps. Continue to support the Cupertino Amateur Radio Emergency Services (CARES), Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) and Medical Reserve Corp (MRC) programs to ensure the development of neighborhood based emergency preparedness throughout the City. Encourage ongoing cooperation with CERTs in other cities. HS-2.3.2: Community Groups. Continue pre-disaster agreements with appropriate community groups to provide specified post-disaster assistance, through the Emergency Services Coordinator and with the advice of the City Attorney. HS-2.3.3: American Red Cross. Continue to implement the American Red Cross agreements under the direction of the Director of Emergency Services during a disaster. HS-2.3.4: Shelter Providers. Continue the agreement with designated shelter sites to provide space for emergency supply containers. HS-2.3.5: Amateur Radio Operators. Continue to support training and cooperation between the City and Cupertino Amateur Radio Emergency Service (CARES) to prepare for emergency communications needs. POLICY HS-2.4: EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION Maintain an Emergency Public Information program to be used during emergency situations. STRATEGIES: HS-2.4.1: Communication Methods. Use the local TV channel, Cupertino Alert System (CAS), the Internet and other communication methods to transmit information to the citizenry. HS-2.4.2: Public Information Office. Activate the Public Information in coordination with the Sheriff and the Fire Department to provide accurate information to the public as needed. HS-28 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY HS-2.5: DISASTER MEDICAL RESPONSE Continue to coordinate with the appropriate County agencies and local emergency clinics to ensure preparedness and provide disaster medical response. Coordinate with the CERT members throughout the City to ensure that they are prepared to provide emergency support and first aid at the neighborhood level. STRATEGY: HS-2.5.1: Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Develop a MOU with local emergency clinics. The County’s role and involvement in emergencies should be considered in development of the MOU. POLICY HS-2.6: MILITARY FACILITIES AND READINESS Consider the impact of development on neighboring military facilities and maintain military airspace to ensure military readiness. HS-29 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL HS-3 Protect the community from hazards associated with wildland and urban fires FIRE SAFETY The City seeks to provide direction to the Santa Clara County Fire Department (SCCFD) on ways to better protect the community from natural and human-made fire disasters, and implement local policies to improve building and site design. POLICY HS-3.1: REGIONAL COORDINATION Coordinate wildland fire prevention efforts with adjacent jurisdictions. Encourage the County and the Midpeninsula Open Space District to implement measures to reduce fire hazards, including putting into effect the fire reduction policies of the County Public Safety Element, continuing efforts in fuel management, and considering the use of “green” fire break uses for open space lands. POLICY HS-3.2: EARLY PROJECT REVIEW Involve the Fire Department in the early design stage of all projects requiring public review to assure Fire Department input and modifications as needed. POLICY HS-3.3: EMERGENCY ACCESS Ensure adequate emergency access is provided for all new hillside development. STRATEGIES: HS-3.3.1: Roadway Design. Create an all-weather emergency road system to serve rural areas. HS-3.3.2: Dead-End Street Access. Allow public use of private roadways during an emergency for hillside subdivisions that have dead-end public streets longer than 1,000 feet or find a secondary means of access. HS-3.3.3: Hillside Access Routes. Require new hillside development to have frequent grade breaks in access routes to ensure a timely response from fire personnel. HS-30 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HS-3.3.4: Hillside Road Upgrades. Require new hillside development to upgrade existing access roads to meet Fire Code and City standards. POLICY HS-3.4: PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL ELECTRONIC SECURITY GATES Discourage the use of private residential electronic security gates that act as a barrier to emergency personnel. STRATEGIES: HS-3.4.1: Location. Require a fence exception for electronic security gates in certain areas. HS-3.4.2: Access to Gates. Where electronic security gates are allowed, require the installation of an approved key switch to be accessed by the Fire District. POLICY HS-3.5: COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL FIRE PROTECTION GUIDELINES Coordinate with the Fire Department to develop new guidelines for fire protection for commercial and industrial land uses. POLICY HS-3.6: FIRE PREVENTION AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Promote fire prevention and emergency preparedness through city-initiated public education programs, the government television channel, the Internet, and the Cupertino Scene. POLICY HS-3.7: MULTI-STORY BUILDINGS Ensure that adequate fire protection is built into the design of multi-story buildings and require on-site fire suppression materials and equipment. POLICY HS-3.8: EXTENSION OF WATER SERVICE Encourage the water companies to extend water service into the hillside and canyon areas and encourage cooperation between water utility companies and the Fire Department in order to keep water systems in pace with growth and firefighting service needs. HS-31 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL HS-4 Ensure high levels of community safety with police services that meet the community’s needs PUBLIC SAFETY The City seeks to support public safety through improved police services and better site design. POLICY HS-4.1: NEIGHBORHOOD AWARENESS PROGRAMS Continue to support the Neighborhood Watch Program and other similar programs intended to help neighborhoods prevent crime through social interaction. POLICY HS-4.2: CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH BUILDING AND SITE DESIGN Consider appropriate design techniques to reduce crime and vandalism when designing public spaces and reviewing development proposals. STRATEGIES: HS-4.2.1: Perimeter Roads for Parks. Encircle neighborhood parks with a public road to provide visual accessibility whenever possible. HS-4.2.2: Development Review. Continue to request County Sheriff review and comment on development applications for security and public safety measures. POLICY HS-4.3: FISCAL IMPACTS Recognize fiscal impacts to the County Sheriff and City of Cupertino when approving various land use mixes. HS-32 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL HS-5 Reduce ricks associated with geologic and seismic hazards POLICY HS-5.1: SEISMIC AND GEOLOGIC REVIEW PROCESS Evaluate new development proposals within mapped potential hazard zones using a formal seismic/geologic review process. Use Table HS-3 of this Element to determine the level of review required. STRATEGIES: HS-5.1.1: Geotechnical and Structural Analysis. Require any site with a slope exceeding 10 percent to reference the Landslide Hazard Potential Zone maps of the State of California for all required geotechnical and structural analysis. HS-5.1.2: Residential Upgrades. Require that any residential facility, that is being increased more than 50 percent assessed value or physical size, conform to all provisions of the current building code throughout the entire structure. Owners of residential buildings with known structural defects, such as un-reinforced garage openings, “soft first story” construction, unbolted foundations, or inadequate sheer walls are encouraged to take steps to remedy the problem and bring their buildings up to the current building code. GEOLOGIC AND SEISMIC HAZARDS HS-33 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HS-5.1.3: Geologic Review. Continue to implement and update geologic review procedures for Geologic Reports required by the Municipal Code through the development review process. POLICY HS-5.2: PUBLIC EDUCATION ON SEISMIC SAFETY Reinforce the existing public education programs to help residents minimize hazards resulting from earthquakes. STRATEGIES: HS-5.2.1: Covenant on Seismic Risk. Require developers to record a covenant to tell future residents in high-risk areas about the risk and inform them that more information is in City Hall records. This is in addition to the State requirement that information on the geological report is recorded on the face of subdivision maps. HS-5.2.2: Emergency Preparedness. Publish and promote emergency preparedness activities and drills. Use the City social media, and the website to provide safety tips that may include identifying and correcting household hazards, knowing how and when to turn off utilities, helping family members protect themselves during and after an earthquake, recommending neighborhood preparation activities, and advising residents to maintain an emergency supply kit containing first-aid supplies, food, drinking water and battery operated radios and flashlights. HS-5.2.3: Neighborhood Response Groups. Encourage participation in Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training. Train neighborhood groups to care for themselves during disasters. Actively assist in neighborhood drills and safety exercises to increase participation and build community support. HS-5.2.4: Dependent Populations. As part of community-wide efforts, actively cooperate with State agencies that oversee facilities for persons with disabilities and those with access and functional needs, to ensure that such facilities conform to all health and safety requirements, including emergency planning, training, exercises and employee education. HS-5.2.5: Foreign Language Emergency Information. Obtain translated emergency preparedness materials and make them available to appropriate foreign language populations. HS-34 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL HS-6 Protect people and property from the risks associated with hazardous materials and exposure to electromagnetic fields POLICY HS-6.1: HAZARDOUS MATERIALS STORAGE AND DISPOSAL Require the proper storage and disposal of hazardous materials to prevent leakage, potential explosions, fire or the release of harmful fumes. Maintain information channels to the residential and business communities about the illegality and danger of dumping hazardous material and waste in the storm drain system or in creeks. POLICY HS-6.2: PROXIMITY OF RESIDENTS TO HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Assess future residents’ exposure to hazardous materials when new residential development or sensitive populations are proposed in existing industrial and manufacturing areas. Do not allow residential development or sensitive populations if such hazardous conditions cannot be mitigated to an acceptable level of risk. POLICY HS-6.3: ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS (EMF) Ensure that projects meet Federal and State standards for EMF emissions through development review. POLICY HS-6.4: EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS Continue to encourage residents and businesses to use non- and less- hazardous products, especially less toxic pest control products, to slow the generation of new reduce hazardous waste requiring disposal through the county-wide program. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS The City is committed to protecting its citizens from hazardous materials through improved disposal practices, better site design and more public education. HS-35 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY HS-6.5: HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSALS Continue to support and facilitate, for residences and businesses, a convenient opportunity to properly dispose of hazardous waste. STRATEGIES: HS-6.5.1: Partner on Hazardous Waste Collection and Disposal. Continue to explore efficient, economical and convenient ways to offer Household Hazardous Waste collection for residents in partnership with the Solid Waste contractor or the County. HS-6.5.2: Educational Materials. Publish educational materials about the program in the Cupertino Scene, City website, and brochures that are distributed throughout the community. HS-36 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL HS-7 Protect people and property from risks associated with floods POLICY HS-7.1: EVACUATION MAP Prepare and update periodically an evacuation map for the flood hazard areas and distribute it to the general public. POLICY HS-7.2: EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO DAM FAILURE Ensure that Cupertino is prepared to respond to a potential dam failure. STRATEGIES: HS-7.2.1: Emergency and Evacuation Plan. Maintain and update a Stevens Creek Dam Failure Plan, including alert, warning and notification systems and appropriate signage. HS-7.2.2: Inter-agency Cooperation. Continue to coordinate dam-related evacuation plans and alert/notification systems with the City of Sunnyvale, the Santa Clara Valley Water District and Santa Clara County to ensure that traffic management between the agencies facilitates life safety. Also work with other neighboring cities to enhance communication and coordination during a dam-related emergency. POLICY HS-7.3: EXISTING NON- RESIDENTIAL USES IN THE FLOOD PLAIN Allow commercial and recreational uses that are now exclusively within the flood plain to remain in their present use or to be used for agriculture, provided it doesn’t conflict with Federal, State and regional requirements. FLOODING The City seeks to ensure community protection from floods through the design of projects, municipal operations and public education. HS-37 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY HS-7.4: CONSTRUCTION IN FLOOD PLAINS Continue to implement land use, zoning and building code regulations limiting new construction in the already urbanized flood hazard areas recognized by the Federal Flood Insurance Administrator. STRATEGIES: HS-7.4.1: Dwellings in Flood Plains. Discourage new residential development in regulated flood plains. Regulate all types of redevelopment in natural flood plains. This includes discouraging fill materials and obstructions that may increase flood potential or modify the natural riparian corridors. HS-7.4.2: Description of Flood Zone Regulation. Continue to maintain and update a map of potential flood hazard areas and a description of flood zone regulations on the City’s website. HS-7.4.3: National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System. Continue to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS). POLICY HS-7.5: HILLSIDE GRADING Restrict the extent and timing of hillside grading operations to April through October except as otherwise allowed by the City. Require performance bonds during the remaining time to guarantee the repair of any erosion damage. Require planting of graded slopes as soon as practical after grading is complete. POLICY HS-7.6: STABILITY OF EXISTING WATER STORAGE FACILITIES Assure the structural integrity of water storage facilities. STRATEGY: HS-7.6.1: Coordination with other Agencies. Work closely with the San Jose Water Company and owners of other water storage facilities to develop and implement a program to monitor the stability of all existing water storage facilities and related improvements, such as: distribution lines, connections and other system- components. HS-38 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL HS-8 Minimize noise impacts on the community and maintain a compatible noise environment for existing and future land use POLICY HS-8.1: LAND USE DECISION EVALUATION Use the Land Use Compatibility for Community Noise Environments chart, the Future Noise Contour Map (see Figure D-1 in Appendix D) and the City Municipal Code to evaluate land use decisions. POLICY HS-8.2: BUILDING AND SITE DESIGN Minimize noise impacts through appropriate building and site design. STRATEGIES: HS-8.2.1: Commercial Delivery Areas. Locate delivery areas for new commercial and industrial developments away from existing or planned homes. HS-8.2.2: Noise Control Techniques. Require analysis and implementation of techniques to control the effects of noise from industrial equipment and processes for projects near low- intensity residential uses. HS-8.2.3: Sound Wall Requirements. Exercise discretion in requiring sound walls to be sure that all other measures of noise control have been explored and that the sound wall blends with the neighborhood. Sound walls should be designed and landscaped to fit into the environment. NOISE The City seeks to ensure that the community continues to enjoy a high quality of life through reduce noise pollution, effective project design and noise management operations. HS-39 CHAPTER 7: HEALTH AND SAFETY ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY HS-8.3: CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES Regulate construction and maintenance activities. Establish and enforce reasonable allowable periods of the day, during weekdays, weekends and holidays for construction activities. Require construction contractors to use the best available technology to minimize excessive noise and vibration from construction equipment such as pile drivers, jack hammers, and vibratory rollers. POLICY HS-8.4: FREEWAY DESIGN AND NEIGHBORHOOD NOISE Ensure that roads and development along Highway 85 and Interstate 280 are designed and improved in a way that minimizes neighborhood noise. POLICY HS-8.5: NEIGHBORHOODS Review residents’ needs for convenience and safety and prioritize them over the convenient movement of commute or through traffic where practical. POLICY HS-8.6: TRAFFIC CALMING SOLUTIONS TO STREET NOISE Evaluate solutions to discourage through traffic in neighborhoods through enhanced paving and modified street design. STRATEGY: HS-8.6.1: Local Improvement. Modify street design to minimize noise impact to neighbors. POLICY HS-8.7: REDUCTION OF NOISE FROM TRUCKING OPERATIONS Work to carry out noise mitigation measures to diminish noise along Foothill and Stevens Creek Boulevards from the quarry and cement plant trucking operations. These measures include regulation of truck speed, the volume of truck activity, and trucking activity hours to avoid late evening and early morning. Alternatives to truck transport, specifically rail, are strongly encouraged when feasible. STRATEGIES: HS-8.7.1: Restrictions in the County’s Use Permit. Coordinate with the County to restrict the number of trucks, their speed and noise levels along Foothill and Stevens Creek Boulevards, to the extent allowed in the Use Permit. Ensure that restrictions are monitored and enforced by the County. HS-8.7.2: Road Improvements to Reduce Truck Impacts. Consider road improvements such as medians, landscaping, noise attenuating asphalt, and other methods to reduce quarry truck impacts. HS-40 infrastructure 8 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) INF-2 Cupertino’s public infrastructure works in tandem with the built and natural environments to contribute to the exceptional quality of life enjoyed by local residents, visitors and workers. The city’s public and private infrastructure – water, storm drains, telecommunications and solid waste – are vital to supporting the community’s everyday activities. This Element includes goals, policies and strategies for the development and maintenance of an exceptional system of high-quality and adequate infrastructure to support community needs and development anticipated in Community Vision 2040. It also ensures that the City’s existing infrastructure is maintained, upgraded, replaced and expanded when needed. The City’s commitment to environmental sustainability provides direction for innovative strategies to help the City conserve water and energy use, reduce waste, improve water and air quality, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Introduction INF-2 Introduction INF-3 Context Water Wastewater Stormwater Telecommunications Solid Waste and Recycling INF-7 Looking Forward INF-9 Goals and Policies Citywide Infrastructure Rights-of-Way Water Stormwater Waste Water Telecommunications Solid Waste Reduce, Reuse and Recycle CONTENTS: CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) The City regularly prepares a Five-Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) to identify capital projects and options for financing them. It is the City’s primary mechanism for building and maintaining citywide infrastructure such as streets, medians and stormwater systems, and City-owned facilities, parks, trails and bridges. Much of the City’s infrastructure was built between the 1950s and 1970s when it was first incorporated and developed. Other areas that were later annexed into the city typically have older and/or outdated infrastructure. Planning for replacement and upgrades to these facilities will be important to ensure that all residents and businesses have access to excellent services. Identifying sustainable funding sources is also important to ensure that infrastructure improvements can be built in a timely manner and effectively maintained to meet community needs. The following is a summary of key infrastructure systems that currently exist in Cupertino. WATER Cupertino has two major water suppliers: the California Water Company and the San Jose Water Company. Both retailers purchase their water supply from the Santa Clara Valley Water District, which receives water from the Rinconada Treatment Plant and wells fed by groundwater. The Santa Clara Valley Water District, which is the groundwater management agency in Santa Clara County, manages groundwater recharge through percolation ponds and in-stream recharge of creeks. The McClellan Pond recharge facility (located in Cupertino) and the Stevens Creek Reservoir (located outside the city on its southwest boundary) also contribute to Cupertino’s water supply. In addition to the potable water supply, there is a potential recycled water system planned for the North Vallco Park Special Area as part of the Apple Campus 2. The City anticipates that recycled water will be used for groundwater recharge, irrigation, and will help to offset potable water use in areas served. The recycled water system can be potentially extended to serve other areas of the city in the future as capacity and demand increases and new distribution lines can be built. CONTEXT INF-3 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) WASTEWATER Wastewater collection and treatment are provided to the City by the Cupertino Sanitary District and the City of Sunnyvale. The majority of the City is served by the Cupertino Sanitary District, while the City of Sunnyvale serves only a small portion of the Cupertino Urban Service area within the Rancho Rinconada area. The Cupertino Sanitary District was formed in 1956 and is currently in the process of updating its 1964 Master Plan. The District collects and transports waste water collected in Cupertino to the San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant located in North San Jose. The District maintains approximately one million linear feet of sewer lines and 500,000 linear feet of sewer laterals and 17 pump stations. While the physical condition of the infrastructure appears to be in relatively good condition, there are issues with the carrying capacity of a number of lines in the system. The lines serving the City Center development, Stevens Creek Boulevard between Randy Lane and Wolfe Road, Wolfe Road south of Interstate 280, Stelling Road and Foothill Boulevard are running either at capacity or over capacity. In order to accommodate future development, lines would have to be upgraded. Any necessary improvements are expected to be coordinated with development review, with new projects bearing their share of the cost or partnering with the Sanitary District to provide improvements needed to increase capacity. The City of Sunnyvale provides wastewater treatment service for Cupertino’s commercial properties along Stevens Creek Boulevard, east of Finch Avenue, and a portion of the Rancho Rinconada neighborhood. While the City of Sunnyvale has adequate capacity to serve anticipated growth and can continue to provide treatment capacity for future growth in its Cupertino service area, there may need to be improvements to the distribution network to address future growth on the east side. Any necessary improvements are expected to be coordinated with development review, with new projects bearing their share of the cost or partnering with the City of Sunnyvale to provide improvements needed to increase capacity. INF-4 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) STORMWATER Comprehensive stormwater management can reduce pollution and erosion, prevent flooding, recharge aquifers with clean water, and prevent Bay pollution. While efforts in early years focused on expanding storm drain capacity and wastewater treatment, the approach today is to reduce and filter runoff through project design and management. Cupertino’s storm drain system currently operates adequately, with some targeted upgrades or improvements likely over the next 25 years. There is only localized flooding in the storm drain system, limited primarily to unimproved streets. The City continues to update its infrastructure planning to ensure that future improvements include best practices for stormwater management. The City, along with 76 other agencies throughout the Bay Area, is regulated by the Municipal Regional Stormwater National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit (MRP). The MRP, which is issued by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, requires the City to carry out a comprehensive stormwater pollution prevention program. In order to comply with these requirements, the City joined with 15 other adjoining agencies to form the Santa Clara Valley Urban Runoff Pollution Prevention Program (SCVURPP). SCVURPP works with the participating agencies and the Regional Board to develop solutions to control urban runoff quality. In addition, the City is required to prepare a city-specific Urban Runoff Management Plan. This plan identifies stormwater pollution control measures such as design, construction and operation best practices, inspections and water-quality monitoring. The regulations are expected to evolve and become more stringent in the future. TELECOMMUNICATIONS Cupertino is located in Silicon Valley, which is home to the world’s greatest technology companies, and is known for its forward-thinking and innovation. In order to ensure that the City can continue being an exceptional place to work and live, efforts will be made to expand access to telecommunications services. The City does not directly supply telecommunications utilities; however, it plays an important role by coordinating with providers, allowing access to public rights- of-way, and ensuring that proposed improvements or changes in service meet community expectations and are integrated in a compatible manner. INF-5 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) SOLID WASTE AND RECYCLING Nearly every human activity leaves behind some kind of waste. Households create ordinary garbage while industrial and manufacturing processes create solid and hazardous waste. Waste uses up limited landfill space, releases toxins and creates greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. The City uses recycling, reuse and reducing consumption as an effective way to manage solid waste. The Air Resources Board, as a means to implement AB 32, identifies in its Scoping Plan mandatory commercial recycling as one of the measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Subsequently, AB 341 sets a goal of 75 percent residential and commercial recycling by 2020. Recology currently provides garbage pickup and recycling services in Cupertino. City residents and businesses served by Recology have achieved a 69 percent diversion rate in 2012. The City is currently working with Recology to develop programs to boost that diversion rate even higher, reduce contamination, and boost organics composting by residents and businesses. With the proposed changes, the City hopes to achieve the 75 percent diversion rate by 2015. To meet its future solid waste disposal needs, the City also executed a contract with Browning and Ferris to provide landfill capacity at Newby Island in Milpitas. The term of the agreement is 35 years and ends in 2023, or at the time the specified tonnage in the contract is reached. INF-6 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) LOOKING FORWARD As the City continues to grow and develop, it will have to look at strategies for replacing and expanding the City’s aging infrastructure to meet community needs. Whereas strategies in the past focused on expansion of facilities, the focus in the future will be looking for ways to reduce demand on infrastructure through sustainable measures and balancing modes of transportation. A key strategy moving forward will be finding new ways to fund infrastructure improvements and ongoing maintenance through new development, partnerships or other methods. The following are ways the City will address key challenges and opportunities facing Cupertino: SUSTAINABLE METHODS. The City will reduce the demand on infrastructure and services by exploring ways to expand water and energy conservation and waste diversion efforts. ACCESS. The City will ensure that the entire community has access to all services. This will include identifying areas where access is not available and looking for strategies to retrofit and partner in the construction of necessary improvements. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH. The City will prioritize methods that improve environmental and community health when exploring strategies to reduce demand and construct facilities. NEW TECHNOLOGIES. The City will utilize technology to deliver services efficiently and effectively. This includes supporting emerging technologies in information services and infrastructure to better serve the business and resident community. COORDINATION. The City will work with service providers to ensure that their infrastructure planning and maintenance goals meet community needs. 2 3 4 5 1 INF-7 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT. The City will enlist the community in programs to achieve goals including recycling and conservation programs. FUNDING. The City will ensure a sustainable source of funding for construction, operation and maintenance of infrastructure. 6 7 INF-8 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) GOAL INF-1 Ensure that the city’s infrastructure is enhanced and maintained to support existing development and growth in a fiscally responsible manner POLICY INF-1.1: INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING Upgrade and enhance the City’s infrastructure through the City’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and requirements for development. STRATEGIES: INF-1.1.1: Capital Improvement Program. Ensure that CIP projects reflect the goals and policies identified in Community Vision 2040. INF-1.1.2: Design Capacity. Ensure that public infrastructure is designed to meet planned needs and to avoid the need for future upsizing. Maintain a balance between meeting future growth needs and over-sizing of infrastructure to avoid fiscal impacts or impacts to other goals. INF-1.1.3: Coordination. Require coordination of construction activity between various providers, particularly in City facilities and rights- of-way, to ensure that the community is not unnecessarily inconvenienced. Require that providers maintain adequate space for all utilities when planning and constructing their infrastructure. POLICY INF-1.2: MAINTENANCE Ensure that existing facilities are maintained to meet the community’s needs. INF-9 The City seeks to coordinate its municipal services with those of other service providers in order to build and maintain infrastructure that fully serves the current and future needs of the Cupertino community. CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) POLICY INF-1.3: COORDINATION Coordinate with utility and service providers to ensure that their planning and operations meet the City’s service standards and future growth. POLICY INF-1.4: FUNDING Explore various strategies and opportunities to fund existing and future infrastructure needs. STRATEGIES: INF-1.4.1: Existing Infrastructure. Require developers to expand or upgrade existing infrastructure to increase capacity, or pay their fair share, as appropriate. INF-1.4.2: Future Infrastructure Needs. For new infrastructure, require new development to pay its fair share of, or to extend or construct, improvements to accommodate growth without impacting service levels. INF-1.4.3: Economic Development. Prioritize funding of infrastructure to stimulate economic development and job creation in order to increase opportunities for municipal revenue. INF-10 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) POLICY INF-2.1: MAINTENANCE Maintain the City’s right-of-way and traffic operations systems. POLICY INF-2.2: MULTIMODAL SYSTEMS Ensure that City rights-of-way are planned for a variety of transportation alternatives including pedestrian, bicycle, automobile, as well as new technologies such as driverless cars, etc. POLICY INF-2.3: GREEN STREETS Explore the development of a “green streets” program to minimize stormwater runoff in City rights-of- way. POLICY INF-2.4: UNDERGROUNDING UTILITIES Explore undergrounding of utilities through providers, public projects, private development and agency funding programs and grants. STRATEGIES: INF-2.4.1: Public and Provider Generated Projects. Require undergrounding of all new infrastructure projects constructed by public agencies and providers. Work with providers to underground existing overhead lines. INF-2.4.2: Development. Require undergrounding of all utility lines in new developments and highly encourage undergrounding in remodels or redevelopment of major projects. RIGHTS-OF-WAY The City will ensure that public, City-owned rights-of-way are protected in order to support future infrastructure needs and enhanced with sustainable features when possible, and that new infrastructure is placed underground as feasible. GOAL INF-2 Ensure that city rights-of-way are protected from incompatible uses and enhanced with sustainable features when possible INF-11 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) POLICY INF-2.5: RECYCLED WATER INFRASTRUCTURE Plan for citywide access to recycled water and encourage its use. STRATEGIES: INF-2.5.1: Availability. Expand the availability of a recycled water system through public infrastructure projects and development review. INF-2.5.2: Use. Encourage private and public projects to incorporate the use of recycled water for landscaping and other uses. INF-2.5.3: City Facilities. Design and retrofit City buildings, facilities and landscaping to use recycled water, to the extent feasible. INF-12 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) WATER The City will seek to identify ways to improve water availability, access and quality in order to maintain the long-term health of the Cupertino water system. GOAL INF-3 Create a coordinated strategy to ensure a sustained supply of potable water through planning and conservation POLICY INF-3.1: COORDINATION WITH PROVIDERS Coordinate with water providers and agencies in their planning and infrastructure process to ensure that the City continues to have adequate supply for current needs and future growth. STRATEGY: INF-3.1.1: Maintenance. Coordinate with providers to ensure that water and recycled water delivery systems are maintained in good condition. POLICY INF-3.2: REGIONAL COORDINATION Coordinate with State and regional agencies to ensure that policies and programs related to water provision and conservation meet City goals. Note: additional water conservation policies are discussed in detail in the Environmental Resources and Sustainability Element. INF-13 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) POLICY INF-4.1: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT Create plans and operational policies to develop and maintain an effective and efficient stormwater system. STRATEGIES: INF-4.1.1: Management. Reduce the demand on storm drain capacity through implementation of programs that meet and even exceed on-site drainage requirements. INF-4.1.2: Infrastructure. Develop a Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for the City’s storm drain infrastructure that meets the current and future needs of the community. INF-4.1.3: Maintenance. Ensure that City’s storm drain infrastructure is appropriately maintained to reduce flood hazards through implementation of best practices. POLICY INF-4.2: FUNDING Develop permanent sources of funding storm water infrastructure construction and maintenance. STRATEGY: INF-4.2.1: Ongoing Operations. Review other funding strategies to pay for the ongoing operations and maintenance of the storm drain system per State and regional requirements. Note: additional policies that meet State and regional runoff reduction are described in the Environmental Resources and Sustainability Element. STORMWATER The City will seek to implement best practices in stormwater management in order to reduce demand on the drainage system, and reduce sediment and pollution impacts on the Bay. GOAL INF-4 Implement best practices in stormwater management to reduce demand on the stormwater network, reduce soil erosion, and reduce pollution into reservoirs and the Bay INF-14 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) GOAL INF-5 Ensure that the city’s wastewater system continues to meet current and future needs POLICY INF-5.1: INFRASTRUCTURE Ensure that the infrastructure plans for Cupertino’s waste water system providers continue to meet the City’s current and future needs. STRATEGIES: INF-5.1.1: Coordination. Coordinate with the Cupertino Sanitary District on their Master Plan and the Sunnyvale Treatment Plant to develop a comprehensive capital improvement program to ensure adequate capacity for future development anticipated with General Plan buildout. INF-5.1.2: Development. Require developers to pay their fair share of costs for, or in some cases construct, infrastructure upgrades to ensure that service levels are met. POLICY INF-5.2: DEMAND Look for ways to reduce demand on the City’s wastewater system through implementation of water conservation measures. WASTEWATER The City will ensure that there is adequate and well-maintained waste water capacity through infrastructure enhancements and policies that reduce impact on sanitary sewer system, and that pollution in reservoirs and the Bay is minimized. INF-15 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) POLICY INF-6.1: TELECOMMUNICATIONS MASTER PLAN Maintain and update a Telecommunications Master Plan with regulations and guidelines for wireless and emerging technologies. POLICY INF-6.2: COORDINATION Coordinate with providers to improve access and delivery of services to businesses and homes. STRATEGIES: INF-6.2.1: Facility Upgrades. When possible, require service providers to upgrade existing facilities as part of permit or lease renewals. Encourage use of newer technologies that allow the facility components to be reduced in size or improve screening or camouflaging. INF-6.2.2: Improved Access. Work with providers to expand service to areas that are not served by telecommunications technologies. TELECOMMUNICATIONS The City will promote expansion of a citywide telecommunications system that provides excellent services to businesses and residents, and encourages innovative technologies for the future. GOAL INF-6 Encourage innovative technologies and communications systems that provide excellent services to businesses and residents INF-16 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) INF-6.2.3: City Facilities. Encourage leasing of City sites to expand access to telecommunications services. Develop standards for the incorporation of telecommunications systems and public use. INF-6.2.4: Agency and Private Facilities. Encourage the installation of communications infrastructure in facilities owned by other public agencies and private development. INF-6.2.5: Communications Infrastructure. Support the extension and access to telecommunications infrastructure such as fiber optic cables. POLICY INF-6.3: EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES Encourage new and innovative technologies and partner with providers to provide the community with access to these services. STRATEGY: INF-6.3.1: Strategic Technology Plan. Create and update a Strategic Technology Plan for the City to improve service efficiency. INF-17 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) POLICY INF-7.1: PROVIDERS Coordinate with solid waste system providers to utilize the latest technology and best practices to encourage waste reduction and meet, and even, exceed State targets. POLICY INF-7.2: FACILITIES Ensure that public and private developments build new and on-site facilities and/or retrofit existing on- site facilities to meet the City’s waste diversion requirements. POLICY INF-7.3: OPERATIONS Encourage public agencies and private property owners to design their operations to exceed regulatory waste diversion requirements. STRATEGY: INF-7.3.1: City Facilities and Events. Design new City facilities and retrofit existing facilities and event venues with recycling and trash collection bins to facilitate easy disposal of recyclable and compostable waste by staff and the public. POLICY INF-7.4: PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP Per the City’s Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) policy, support statewide and regional EPR initiatives and legislation to reduce waste and toxins in products, processes and packaging. GOAL INF-7 Ensure that the city meets and exceeds regulatory waste diversion goals by working with providers, businesses and residents SOLID WASTE The City seeks to reduce solid waste and demands on landfills, reduce the release of toxins in the air (including greenhouse gas emissions) and improve community health. INF-18 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) POLICY INF-8.1: REDUCING WASTE Meet or exceed Federal, State and regional requirements for solid waste diversion through implementation of programs. STRATEGIES: INF-8.1.1: Outreach. Conduct and enhance programs that promote waste reduction through partnerships with schools, institutions, businesses and homes. INF-8.1.2: Hazardous Waste. Work with providers and businesses to provide convenient hazardous and e-waste facilities for the community. INF-8.1.3: Preferential Purchasing. Maintain and update a City preferential purchasing policy to products that reduce packaging waste, greenhouse gas emissions, toxic contaminants and are reusable. INF-8.1.4: Reuse. Encourage reuse of materials and reusable products. Develop a program for reuse of materials and reusable products in City facilities and outreach programs for community-wide participation by promoting community- wide garage sales and online venues. INF-8.1.5: Collaboration. Collaborate with agencies and large businesses or projects to enhance opportunities for community-wide recycling, reuse and reduction programs. GOAL INF-8 Develop and enhance programs that reduce, reuse and recycle waste REDUCE, REUSE AND RECYCLE The City seeks to find additional ways to promote reductions in waste generation and increases in reuse and recycling. INF-19 CHAPTER 8: INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT | general plan (community vision 2015-2040) INF-8.1.6: Construction Waste. Encourage recycling and reuse of building materials during demolition and construction of City, agency and private projects. INF-8.1.7: Recycled Materials. Encourage the use of recycled materials and sustainably harvested materials in City, agency and private projects. INF-20 recreation, parks and community services 9 general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) 1 Cupertino’s parks, recreation programs and community services complement the built and natural environments and enhance the community. They enliven our Neighborhoods and Special Areas and help promote health, interactions and community-building. This Element includes goals, policies and strategies for the development and maintenance of an exceptional and integrated system of high-quality parks, recreational amenities and community services that support current and future needs anticipated in Community Vision 2040. As Cupertino grows over time, the city’s parks and recreation programs will have to adapt to meet changing needs. This Element ensures that the City will continue to provide high-quality parks and recreation programs, improve the distribution and access to these facilities, work with other community service providers, and protect open space. Introduction RPC-2 Introduction RPC-3 Context Parks and Open Space Park Standards Park Accessibility Recreation Programs Schools Library RPC-18 Looking Forward RPC-20 Goals and Policies Parks and Open Space Trails Recreation Programs and Services Community Services CONTENTS: CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Cupertino currently has approximately 165 acres of City-owned public parks and open space areas. The City’s park system is supplemented by a network of over 220 acres of local and regional interconnected trails that stretch from local open space preserves to the San Francisco Bay. In addition, there are many acres of open space preserves surrounding the city that are operated and maintained by regional agencies and districts, including over 40 acres of open space negotiated through public access agreements. Figures RPC-1 and RPC-2 show the locations of open space areas within and near Cupertino. Local residents, visitors and employees also enjoy a wide range of community services provided by the City and other agencies and districts. Looking towards the future, the City will have to manage its resources effectively and coordinate with other agency providers to ensure that the community’s growing and changing needs are met. The following is a summary of the future direction for the City’s approach to planning, designing and managing open space to ensuring the community’s continued health and quality of life. REGIONAL RESOURCES Several public agencies share the task of acquiring and maintaining open space for the enjoyment within Cupertino and neighboring cities. Cupertino’s land uses in and around these areas typically include low-intensity residential uses, which are consistent with protecting open space areas. MIDPENINSULA REGIONAL OPEN SPACE DISTRICT The Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District was created in 1972 and manages about 62,000 acres of mountainous, foothill and bayland open space in 26 open space preserves. Preserves adjacent to Cupertino are located to the south and west around the foothills, and include Rancho San Antonio, Pichetti Ranch and Fremont Older.FOOTHILL BLVDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD McCLELLAN RD Stevens Creek County Park Linda Vista City Park McClellan Ranch Park Deep Cliff Golf Course LU-1 FIGURE RPC-1 PUBLIC OPEN SPACE IN THE STEVENS CREEK CORRIDOR FOOTHILL BLVDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD McCLELLAN RD Stevens Creek County Park Linda Vista City Park McClellan Ranch Park Deep Cli Golf Course (Based on the September 23, 2002 Stevens Creek Trail Feasibility Study) 0 1000 0500 2000 3000 00.5 1Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend Existing City/County Public Open Space Existing Private Open Space Proposed Open Space Linkage N RPC-3 CONTEXT CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Santa Cruz CountySan Mateo CountySanta Cr u z Santa Cl ara San Mateo Santa Clara FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Proposed Stevens Creek Trail Corridor Upper Stevens Creek County Park Monte Bello Open Space Preserve Monte Bello Open Space Preserve Picchetti Ranch Area Saratoga Gap Open Space Preserve Long Ridge Open Space Preserve Stevens Creek County Park Fremont Older Open Space Preserve Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve Rancho San Antonio County Park Linda Vista City Park San Jose Existing County Parks Existing MidPeninsula Regional Open Space Preserve Proposed Expansion of Regional Open Space Lands Public Access to Open Space Preserves Proposed Open Space Linkages Sunnyvale Santa Clara Saratoga Los Altos There are over 13,000 acres (over 20 square miles) of public open space in Cupertino's boundary agreement area and contiguous jurisdictions. 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 00.5 1Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Heart of the City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas N LU-1 FIGURE RPC-2 OPEN SPACE RPC-4 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-5 SANTA CLARA COUNTY PARKS The Santa Clara County park program was a voter-approved measure to acquire and develop a regional park system. County parks adjacent to Cupertino are located near the southwestern boundary of the city. The County Park plan emphasizes completing Upper Stevens Creek Park and its connection to Stevens Creek near Cupertino. Because the upper portions of Stevens Canyon are environmentally important, the County Parks and Recreation Department has made a commitment to purchase lands to connect these two parks. In 1997, as part of the development of a portion of the San Jose Diocese’s St. Joseph’s Seminary property, the County was able to acquire 133 acres of open space to add to its original holdings in the Rancho San Antonio County Park (which is now managed by the Mid-Peninsula Open Space District). SANTA CLARA VALLEY WATER DISTRICT OPEN SPACE AREAS Trails along creeks owned and managed by the Santa Clara Valley Water District supplement Cupertino’s overall open space and park system. The District helped with the acquisition of open space lands within McClellan Ranch Park. The District works with cities and the county to provide access to creekside trails and parks for recreational opportunities. CITY COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS The City has an excellent system of community and neighborhood parks that provide a place for community gathering, recreation and healthy programs. All existing parks and open space areas are shown in Figure RPC-3 and listed in Table RPC-1. Community parks include Memorial Park and the Stevens Creek corridor area. Memorial Park is an urban park and facility venue for festivals located in the Heart of the City Special Area. The Sports Center, located at the intersection of Stevens Creek Boulevard and Stelling Road, provides a gym and tennis facilities. The Sports Center also has a small facility where teens can gather and play indoor sports. A Senior Center is located at the intersection of Stevens Creek Boulevard and Mary Avenue, which runs programs for seniors in Cupertino. The Quinlan Community Center, located on Stelling Road, runs the bulk of the art, dance, music and other community programs. All of these facilities are located around Memorial Park. CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LU-1 FIGURE RPC-3 PARK AREAS A-1 A-2 B C N E-1 E-2 G O K MF-1 F-2 P-1 P-2 L-1 L-2 H-1 H-2 I-1 I-2 J-1 J-2FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVDBLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLL INGER R D McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Canyon Oak Park Varian Park Sommerset Square Park Little Rancho Park Monta VistaPark McClellan Ranch Park Blackberry Farm Linda Vista Park Kennedy Jr. H.S. Regnart Elem. Jollyman Park Hoover Park 3 Oaks Park Library Field Civic CenterPlaza Cali Plaza Eaton Elem.Hyde Jr. HS Faria Elem. Memorial Park Garden Gate Elem.Stevens Creek Elem. Sports Center Wilson Park PortalPark Creekside Park Lincoln Elem. Mary Ave Dog Park Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos Franco Park Sterling Barnhart Park 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters L eg end City Boundary Heart of the City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas Cupertino Neighborhood Parks Community Park Schools Mini Parks Main Street Town Square Easement L.P. Collins Elementary Field City Center Easement Cupertino Hills Swim & Racquet Club Private Recreation Community Pool Deep Cliff Golf Course N Rancho Rinconada Recreation & Park Civic CenterPark Main Street Park Easement RPC-6 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table RPC-1 Existing Park and Recreation Acreage by Area AREA RES PARKS/ OPEN SPACE ACRE NEIGHBORHOOD PARK ACRE COMMUNITY PARK ACRE SCHOOL ACRE A-1 A-2 Stocklmeir RanchBlesch ParcelStevens Creek Trail 5.00.62.4 McClellan RanchMcClellan Ranch West (Simms Property)Blackberry Farm ParkBlackberry Farm Golf Course 16.03.0 21.516.5 B Cupertino Hills Swim and Racquet Club***2.98 Linda Vista 11.0 Monta Vista HSKennedy Jr. HSLincoln Elem. Regnant Elem. 10.0*9.03.03.0 C E-1 Varian Park 6.0 Stevens Ck. Elem 3.0 E-2 Monta Vista 6.0 F-1 Forge Apts 0.5*Villa Serra 0.61 Franco Park 0.61 Homestead HS 10.0* F-2 Memorial ParkSports Center 20.06.2 Garden Gate Elem.3.0 G Sommerset Square 2.0 Mary Avenue Dog Park 0.5 H-1 Faria Elem. 3.0 H-2 Jollyman 11.5 I-1 City Center Amphitheater 1.39*Wilson ParkLibrary Field 8.03.0 Cali Mill Plaza Park**Civic Center Park**Library PlazaCivic Center Plaza 1.00.71.00.5 Eaton Elem. 3.0 I-2 Creekside 13.0 J-1 Cupertino HS 10.0* J-2 Hyde Jr. HS Sedgewick Elem. 6.04.0* K Rancho Rinconada Swim Rec Facility**2.0 Sterling Barnhart 0.6 L-1 L-2 Portal Park 4.0 Collins Elem.Portal Elem.3.01.71* M Hampton AptArioso Apts 0.5*Main Street Park EasementTown Square Easement .750.80.5* N Oak Valley (2)Canyon Oak Park 0.940.4 Little Rancho Park 0.34 O P-1 Three Oaks 3.0 P-2 Hoover 6.0 Total by Park Type 14.32 74.71 89.4 36 Total All Types 214.43 RPC-7 Notes: * Not included in park acreage, **Privately owned, public access, ***Privately owned CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) The Civic Center complex, located in the central part of the city, provides an additional community venue for gathering and programs. It consists of City Hall, Community Hall and Library Field, which offers indoor and outdoor venues for meetings, functions and outdoor recreation. The Cupertino Library, a facility owned by the City but operated by the County Library District, is also located in the Civic Center complex. The Stevens Creek Corridor, located in the Monta Vista Planning Area, has a natural environment with trails, swimming facilities, group picnic areas, historic orchard (Stocklmeir), historic ranch (McClellan Ranch), a nine-hole golf course (Blackberry Farm Golf Course) and related support facilities. Blackberry Farm Recreational area’s swimming facilities, recreation programs and reserved picnic areas are only available in the summer, although access to the Stevens Creek Corridor trails is available year round. The City is in the process of preparing a Stevens Creek Corridor Master Plan to review the design and planning of facilities and programs throughout the Stevens Creek corridor. City objectives for the plan include accommodating year-around use of the facilities in the corridor; reviewing and revising the plans for the golf course, McClellan Ranch, Stocklmeir, McClellan Ranch West (Simms) and Blesch properties; incorporating the trail system; restoring Stevens Creek; and addressing neighborhood issues. In addition to these community facilities, the City also has a system of neighborhood parks of varying sizes and types that are located throughout Cupertino. Each neighborhood park offers a variety of opportunities for passive and active recreation for adjacent neighborhoods and recreational programs for the community. Lastly, the City also has agreements with the school districts to maintain school fields in return for allowing the community to use the fields, when they are not in use by the schools. PRIVATE AND SEMI-PUBLIC OPEN SPACE RESOURCES There are several private, open space and recreational activity businesses in Cupertino that support the recreational needs of the community. They include the Deep Cliff Golf Course and the Cupertino Hills Swim and Racquet Club in the Monta Vista Planning Area, as well as riding stables in the foothills. The Rancho RPC-8 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Rinconada Recreation Center, a swim and recreational facility operated by a separate District, is available publicly to residents of the Rancho Rinconada Area. These facilities are valuable to the community because they often provide services that are not traditionally provided by the public sector on City or regional parklands. Several hillside and urban subdivisions, and apartment complexes, offer both natural and built recreational facilities for their residents. Private open spaces that are accessible to the public include Cali Mill Plaza at the intersection of Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevards, Civic Park in the Town Center development across from the Civic Center, and the park at the Main Street development along Stevens Creek Boulevard east of Wolfe Road. Lastly, utility power line corridors in the city’s foothills provide public paths and trails through open space areas. TRAILS Trails and paths connect people to each other, create access to open space areas and parks, and provide an alternative to driving from place to place. Promoting more trails and connectivity along creeks, hillsides and through neighborhoods is a major objective of the General Plan. Providing access to open space and parks is not completely dependent on trails. Sidewalks and streets can also connect pedestrians to their destinations. However, occasional barriers often pose an issue when they break the continuity. Future plans for these areas should enhance connectivity to neighborhoods and other parts of the city. Each major trail corridor in Cupertino is discussed in greater detail below. In addition to these trail corridors, the City also seeks to expand access to other trails through grants and development review. Figure RPC-4 identifies major trail linkages in Cupertino. STEVENS CREEK The 65 acre Stevens Creek corridor is Cupertino’s most prominent urban open space/trail resource. The land is designated for recreation, parklands and farming, and provides flood plain area for the creek. Adjoining properties are zoned for low-density residential use. The Stevens Creek Corridor Plan retains RPC-9 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-10 FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Existing or Proposed Trail Linkages Future Trail Linkages Los Altos Potential Trails Potential Alternative Trail Alignment N Calabazas Creek Trail San Tomas Aquino Trail San Tomas Aquino Trail Linda Vista Park Rancho San Antonio Park 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Heart of the City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas LU-1 FIGURE RPC-4 TRAIL LINKAGE FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Existing or Proposed Trail Linkages Future Trail Linkages Los Altos Potential Trails Potential Alternative Trail Alignment N Calabazas Creek Trail San Tomas Aquino Trail San Tomas Aquino Trail Linda Vista Park Rancho San Antonio Park 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Heart of the City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-11 the open space character of the Stevens Creek greenbelt between the Stevens Creek reservoir and Stevens Creek Boulevard, and offers historical significance relating to the Juan Bautista De Anza Trail designation. The City is participating with the Santa Clara Valley Water District and adjacent cities including Sunnyvale, Los Altos and Mountain View in a Four Cities Coordinated Stevens Creek Trail Feasibility Study to explore connections for a trail following Stevens Creek, extending to the San Francisco Bay. The study is currently in progress and is expected to be completed in 2015. The City will implement recommendations from the study endorsed by the City Council. The City’s acquisition of Linda Vista Park, McClellan Ranch, Blackberry Farm, and the McClellan Ranch West (Simms), Stocklmeir properties, and more recently, the Blesch property support these planning efforts. The 2002 Stevens Creek Trail Feasibility study concluded that it is feasible to construct 7.7 miles of separated and on-street multi-use paths connecting to Rancho San Antonio and Stevens Creek County parks. To complete the trail, a public trail easement through the approximately 150 acre former quarry property south of Linda Vista Park will be established when the property is proposed for development. The former quarry haul road connects Linda Vista Park to McClellan Road. It is under the same ownership as the quarry and is necessary to link these properties. Full build out of the Stevens Creek trail is expected to take about 10 to 15 years. CALABAZAS CREEK There is an opportunity for a trail along Calabazas Creek that would connect the South Vallco Planning Area to Cupertino High School and Creekside Park. SAN TOMAS-AQUINO/SARATOGA CREEK Cupertino’s section of the 12 mile San Tomas-Aquino Trail crosses into the city from Santa Clara on Pruneridge Avenue, extends to bicycle lanes on Bollinger Road, and further extends north-south along the city limit between San Jose and Cupertino. The City has explored the potential to create a linear Lawrence-Mitty Park along the creek with the cooperation of Santa Clara County, neighboring jurisdictions and the Santa Clara Valley Water District. Discussions on trail options in this area are ongoing. CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD The 8.7 mile proposed Union Pacific Rail Trail corridor extends through the cities of Cupertino, Saratoga, Campbell and the town of Los Gatos. The trail would link to the Los Gatos Creek Trail, connecting the two most heavily used parks in Santa Clara County: Rancho San Antonio County Park and Vasona County Park. A feasibility study found that this project is not feasible at this time. Acquisition of right-of-way or easements is anticipated if the Railroad goes out of service or if it is able to relinquish right-of-way. The corridor is designated as a proposed trail on the Trail Linkages diagram. Should the railroad corridor use change, provision for a continuous trail through the corridor must be included as a project component. DON BURNETT BICYCLE-PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE The Don Burnett Bicycle-Pedestrian Bridge (formerly known as the Mary Avenue Bicycle Footbridge) links the Sunnyvale and north side of I-280 to De Anza College, Memorial Park and the Oaks Shopping Center. It was opened in 2009 and is enjoyed by pedestrians, bicyclists and school children. Its unique design creates a gateway into Cupertino and a landmark for the area. INTERSTATE 280 TRAIL This is a potential trail along the drainage channel on the south side of I-280. The trail has the potential of connecting several significant nodes in the city starting from the Calabazas Creek connection across from the Main Street development to Vallco Shopping District, and ending at De Anza Boulevard. The trail could be potentially extended west of De Anza Boulevard in a later phase. A number of development projects have contributed to a study and potential improvements to implement the trail. The timing of the study is expected to be coordinated with the redevelopment of the Vallco Shopping District and other developments in the area. The City will have to coordinate with the Santa Clara County Valley Water District on the project since it owns the drainage channel. RPC-12 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Saratoga Los Altos FOOTHILLBLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVETANTAU AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN ROAD RAINBOW DRIVEBUBB ROADPROSPECT ROAD 85 280 Stevens Creek Reservoir Canyon Oak Park Varian Park Sommerset Square Park Little Rancho Park Monta Vista Park Jollyman Park Hoover Park 3 Oaks Park Library Field Memorial Park Franco Park Mary Ave Dog Park Wilson Park Portal Park Main Street Town Square Easement Creekside Park Sterling Barnhart ParkMcClellan Park Linda Vista Park Blackberry Farm Cali Plaza Library Plaza CivicCenterPark Civic CenterPlaza City Center Easement Main Street Park Easement Sports Center 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 00.5 1Mile 1000 Feet Meters Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas 1/2 Mile Access Range From Park Sites Existing Park Site L.P. Collins Elementary Field N FIGURE RPC-5 PARK ACCESS RPC-13 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PARK STANDARDS A well-planned park program incorporates a variety of facilities and programs to meet the community’s needs. The program must also be flexible so that it can be updated as the community grows and changes in the future. The City is proposing a Parks and Recreation Master Plan that responds to these issues. Key elements of such a master plan will include parks performance standards, a classification system of park type and a recreation program for the community. The master plan will also identify locations where additional capacity is needed to meet the current and future needs of its residents and workers and strategies to bridge the gaps. The City is fortunate to have access to a multitude of trails and regional park resources within Cupertino, which, along with the City’s inventory of available parkland, provides approximately 430 acres of park and recreation area for city residents (or approximately 7.37 acres of parkland per 1,000 residents). The City’s inventory of available parkland, which includes community and neighborhood parks as well as publicly accessible parks through agreements, is approximately 210 acres (or approximately 3.6 acres per 1,000 residents). If the amount of parkland accessible due to agreements with the Cupertino Union School District is excluded, the available parkland is 174 acres (or approximately 2.98 acres per 1,000 residents). The City’s standard currently specifies three acres of parkland per 1,000 residents. However, the City should continue to explore raising the parkland standard to five acres per 1,000 residents for its parks acquisition program. PARK ACCESSIBILITY One of the City’s key objectives in planning for neighborhoods is to distribute parks and open space within the community so that all residents can safely walk or bike to a recreation facility. This has the advantage of improving neighborhood identity, social interactions and the overall health of the community. Figure RPC-5 shows the neighborhoods and the 1/2 mile service area radius for neighborhood parks. The service area map includes walking and biking impediments due to physical barriers, such as freeways, railroad tracks or stream beds. In addition, busy streets may discourage some people, especially RPC-14 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-15 Table RPC-2 Proposed park and Open Space Acreage Acquisition by Area Area Existing Park Acres Potential Park Lands DescriptionNeighborhood Park Community Park A-1 A-2 65 5.5933.00 Reuse Blackberry Farm for Community Park B 28.98 C E-1 9.0 E-2 6.0 F-1 1.22 3.5 G 29.2 Memorial Park contains Neighborhood Facilities H-1 2.5 H-2 3.0 I-1 11.5 I-2 17.2 J-1 13 J-2 Neighborhood Park K 6.0 L-1 2.6 3.5 Neighborhood Park L-2 Neighborhood Park M 7 N 1.55 3.5 Neighborhood Park O 1.68 P-1 P-2 3.0 Total Existing Park 6.0 Lands 214.43 Total Prop Parks Land 49.09 Total All Park Lands 263.52 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) young children, from visiting nearby parks. The Complete Streets policies in the Mobility Element will work in tandem with parks planning to ensure that key intersections connecting neighborhoods to services are improved for pedestrian and bicycle connections. Table RPC-2 shows the park and open space acreage proposed by area. Acquisition strategies will include agreements to allowing community use of school sites, expanding and making modifications to existing parks, leveraging State and regional funding, and park dedication requirements for major new developments. RECREATION PROGRAMS The City offers a variety of recreation programs for residents ranging from pre-school age children to its seniors. These include sports, arts, educational programs, teen programs, senior programs and services, special festivals and events and other activities. As the community profile changes, these programs will have to evolve to address their specific needs. The City is continuously working to refine and revise its programs to serve its population, while ensuring that the programs can be mostly maintained by fees charged. Programs such as environmental education, health and wellness, after school programs, art and cultural diversity programs, science and math camps, and adventure programs are examples of programs that are growing in need and popularity. SCHOOLS Cupertino is served by excellent institutions of public education. Cupertino Union School District, Fremont Union High School District and Foothill-De Anza Community College District provide nationally acclaimed elementary, secondary and post-secondary education. This group of school districts is one of the primary attractions of Cupertino for home buyers, particularly families with school-age children. While the City is not directly involved in the provision of education, it does control growth and development that can affect schools by increasing student enrollment beyond the means of schools to service them. In turn, it is crucial for the City to continue working directly with the school districts to maintain their current high quality. RPC-16 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-17 In addition, the City should continue to coordinate with schools to partner on open space and cultural opportunities for community use. The City is already implementing, and hopes to expand, the field maintenance agreements with schools to allow community use when these facilities are not in use by schools. The City will also explore partnerships with De Anza College and the school districts to make available their theater, tennis courts and community meeting spaces for use by community groups. LIBRARY The Cupertino Library, operated by the Santa Clara County Library under the Joint Powers Authority Agreement, is an important community resource. The City continues to contribute to the library’s annual operating costs, which are necessary to implement and enhance services provided by the County Library. In addition, the City built a new 54,000 square foot library in 2004, which replaced an outdated 23,000 square foot library. This new facility was needed to accommodate the needs of the growing community. Cupertino Library is now a key community destination in the Civic Center and runs a variety of reading programs and other community activities. A Civic Center Master Plan is currently being developed to meet the facility and parking needs of the various site elements, including the Library, Library Field, City Hall, Community Hall, and the plaza. CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) LOOKING FORWARD As the Cupertino community grows and changes in age, diversity and ability, the City’s parks and recreation programs will have to adjust to meet those needs. In cases where needed services are not provided by the City, the City will partner with other providers to ensure that community goals and expectations are met. The City will also have to look for ways to expand and deliver services in a manner that is fiscally-responsible by partnering with public agencies, service providers and private development, and looking for grants to supplement funding for projects. The City will also have to continually update its portfolio of facilities and recreation services to prioritize programs that are most needed and can serve the community in an equitable manner. The City should also explore ways to take advantage of sustainable practices to reduce facility maintenance costs. The following are ways the City will address key challenges and opportunities facing Cupertino: EXPAND RECREATION FACILITIES. As the City realizes added growth anticipated in Community Vision 2040 it will have to look at expanding facilities and programs. These can be achieved through careful master planning, implementation of a Capital Improvement Program (CIP), and partnering with agencies and private developers to increase park and open space. EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION AND ACCESS. In the future, the City should look to balancing its recreation facilities so that each neighborhood and special area has easy access to parks and recreation services. Strategies to achieve this include removing physical barriers and improving pedestrian and bicycle paths to such facilities, prioritizing areas that are deficient in park space, retrofitting facilities and revising programs to meet community needs. 1 2 RPC-18 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) COLLABORATION. The City will rely heavily on partnerships and collaboration with other service providers in sharing facilities and services, and ensuring that City plans meet the community’s current and future needs. This will allow the City to deliver services in a manner that is efficient and fiscally responsible. SUSTAINABILITY. The City should explore ways to redevelop, build and maintain facilities and parks in an environmentally sustainable manner. Such practices will allow the City to reduce maintenance costs for buildings and landscaping, while also improving community health. FUNDING. The City should continue to explore ways to deliver services in a fiscally responsible manner by identifying new sources of funding through grants, working with developers to expand facilities and services, sharing facilities with other agencies and school districts, and reviewing recreation programs to ensure that they meet demand. 3 4 5 RPC-19 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOALS AND POLICIES The goals and policies in this section provide guidance on how the City can continue to serve the needs of the community through the growth and change in the horizon of Community Vision 2040. RPC-20 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-21 POLICY RPC-1.1: PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Prepare a citywide Parks and Recreation Master Plan that outlines policies and strategies to plan for the communities open space and recreational needs. STRATEGIES: RPC-1.1.1: Stevens Creek Corridor Master Plan. Prepare a master plan for the park and open space corridor along Stevens Creek including McClellan Ranch, McClellan Ranch West, Blackberry Farm, the Blackberry Farm golf course, Stocklmeir and Blesch properties and the Nathan Hall Tank House area. The plan should address a fiscally sustainable strategy that allows year- round community use of the park system, while preserving the areas natural resources and addressing neighborhood issues including connectivity and buffers. RPC-1.1.2: Civic Center Master Plan. Prepare a master plan that addresses the needs of the elements in the Civic Center area including City Hall, Community Hall, Library Field, Library programming, function and meeting space and community gathering space and parking needs. PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Parks and open space policies outline acquisition, development, distribution, access and maintenance of parkland in Cupertino in order to ensure that all residents enjoy easy access to these areas. GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of Cupertino GOAL RPC-1 Create a full range of park and recreational resources and preserve natural resources CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-22 POLICY RPC-1.2: PARKLAND STANDARDS. Continue to implement a parkland acquisition and implementation program that provides a minimum of three acres per 1,000 residents. STRATEGIES: RPC-1.2.1: Park Size. Require target for parks based on function and activity supported as part of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. While the preferred size for most neighborhood parks is about 3.5 acres for flexibility of use, smaller size parks may be considered based on opportunities and circumstances. RPC-1.2.2: Amend Parkland Standard. Explore increasing the parkland standard to five acres per 1,000 residents as part of the citywide Parks and Recreation Master Plan. POLICY RPC-1.3: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) Ensure that CIP projects reflect the goals and policies identified in Community Vision 2040, establishing a criteria for ranking CIP proposals for the highest and best selection of community projects. CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY RPC-2.1: PARKLAND ACQUISITION The City’s parkland acquisition strategy should be based upon three broad objectives: • Distributing parks equitably throughout the City; • Connecting and providing access by providing paths, improved pedestrian and bike connectivity and signage; and • Obtaining creek lands and restoring creeks and other natural open space areas, including strips of land adjacent to creeks that may be utilized in creating buffer areas, trails and trail amenities. STRATEGIES: RPC-2.1.1: Dedication of Parkland. New developments, in areas where parkland deficiencies have been identified, should be required to dedicate parkland rather than paying in-lieu fees. RPC-2.1.2: Public Use of School Sites. Zone all public school sites for public use to allow for the public to use sites, when not in use by schools, through shared arrangements. RPC-2.1.3: Acquisition of Surplus Properties. Explore acquisition of surplus school and agency properties for parkland. Take advantage of the Naylor Act to purchase surplus school sites. GOAL RPC-2 Distribute parks and open space throughout the community and provide services, and safe and easy access, to all residents and workers RPC-23 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) POLICY RPC-2.2: PRIVATE OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION FACILITIES Encourage the continued existence and profitability of private open space and recreation facilities through incentives and development controls. STRATEGIES: RPC-2.2.1: Existing Facilities. Encourage the continued existence of private recreational facilities through land use zoning and incentives. RPC-2.2.2: New Facilities. • Require major developments to incorporate private open space and recreational facilities, and seek their cooperation in making the spaces publicly accessible. • Where feasible, ensure park space is publicly accessible (as opposed to private space). • Encourage active areas to serve community needs. However, a combination of active and passive areas can be provided based on the setting. • Integrate park facilities into the surroundings. • If public parkland is not dedicated, require park fees based on a formula that considers the extent to which the publicly-accessible facilities meet community need. POLICY RPC-2.3: PARKLAND DISTRIBUTION Strive for an equitable distribution of parks and recreational facilities throughout the City. Park acquisition should be based on the following priority list. Accessibility to parks should be a component of the acquisition plan. • High Priority: Parks in neighborhoods or areas that have few or no park and recreational areas. • Medium Priority: Parks in neighborhoods that have other agency facilities such as school fields and district facilities, but no City parks. • Low Priority: Neighborhoods and areas that have park and recreational areas which may be slightly less than the adopted City’s parkland standard. • Private Development: Consider pocket parks in new and renovated projects to provide opportunities for publicly-accessible park areas. POLICY RPC-2.4: CONNECTIVITY AND ACCESS Ensure that each home is within a half-mile walk of a neighborhood park or community park with neighborhood facilities; ensure that walking and RPC-24 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) biking routes are reasonably free of physical barriers, including streets with heavy traffic; provide pedestrian links between parks, wherever possible; and provide adequate directional and site signage to identify public parks. STRATEGIES: RPC-2.4.1: Pedestrian and Bike Planning. Implement recommendations in the Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans to link employment and special areas, and neighborhood to services including parks, schools and neighborhood shopping. RPC-2.4.2: Signage. Adopt and maintain a master signage plan for all public parks to ensure adequate and consistent signage is provided to identify public recreational areas. POLICY RPC-2.5: RANGE OF PARK AMENITIES Provide parks and recreational facilities for a variety of recreational activities. STRATEGIES: RPC-2.5.1: Special Needs. Extend recreational opportunities for special needs groups (seniors, disabled, visually-challenged, etc.) by making improvements to existing facilities and trails. RPC-2.5.2: Recreational Facilities. Explore the possibility of providing additional access to existing facilities such as gymnasiums, swimming pools and tennis courts. RPC-2.5.3: Community Gardens. Encourage community gardens, which provide a more livable environment by controlling physical factors such as temperature, noise, and pollution. RPC-25 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-26 POLICY RPC-3.1: PRESERVATION OF NATURAL AREAS Design parks to utilize natural features and the topography of the site in order to protect natural features and keep maintenance costs low. STRATEGIES: RPC-3.1.1: Native Planting. Maximize the use of native plants and drought-tolerant planting. RPC-3.1.2: Natural Habitat. Where possible, restore and provide access to creeks and riparian habitat. RPC-3.1.3: Nature Play Areas. Where appropriate, consider establishing Nature Play Areas in lieu of the more conventional play equipment. GOAL RPC-3 Preserve and enhance access to parks that have significant natural resources CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of Cupertino GOAL RPC-4 Integrate parks and public facilities within neighborhoods and areas POLICY RPC-4.1: RECREATIONAL INTENSITY Design parks appropriately to address the facility and recreational programming required by each special area and neighborhood based on current and future plans for the areas. POLICY RPC-4.2: PARK SAFETY Design parks to enhance public safety by providing visibility to the street and access for public safety responders. RPC-27 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-28 TRAILS Trails policies encourage the provision of a system of linear connections along creeks, utility rights-of-way and other corridors in order to provide recreational opportunities, improve pedestrian and bicycle access throughout the city, improve safety, and preserve natural resources. POLICY RPC-5.1: OPEN SPACE AND TRAIL LINKAGES Dedicate or acquire open space land along creeks and utility through regional cooperation, grants and private development review. STRATEGIES: RPC-5.1.1: Pedestrian and Bike Planning. Implement recommendations in the Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan that link trails and open space to neighborhoods and special areas. RPC-5.1.2: Trail Projects. Implement trail projects described in this Element; evaluate any safety, security and privacy impacts and mitigations associated with trail development; and work with affected neighbors in locating trails to ensure that their concerns are appropriately addressed. GOAL RPC-5 Create an interconnected system of multi- use trails and provide safe pedestrian and bicycle access through the city and connections to local nodes and destinations CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-5.1.3: Dedicated Trail Easements. Require dedication or easements for trails, as well as their implementation, as part of the development review process, where appropriate. RPC-5.1.4: Joint Use Agreement. Establish a Joint Use Agreement with the Santa Clara Valley Water District that enhances the implementation of a trail program which increases the use of, and sets standards and measures for, creek trails. POLICY RPC-5.2: PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE PATHS Develop a citywide network of pedestrian and bicycle pathways to connect employment centers, shopping areas and neighborhoods to services including parks, schools, libraries and neighborhood centers. RPC-29 CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-30 RECREATION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Recreation programs and services policies provide guidance for the implementation of programs that serve the changing and growing needs of the community in order to ensure an exceptional quality of life. POLICY RPC-6.1: DIVERSE PROGRAMS Ensure that the City continues to offer a wide range of programs to serve diverse populations of all ages and abilities. POLICY RPC-6.2: PARTNERSHIPS Enhance the city’s recreational programs and library service through partnerships with other agencies and non-profit organizations. Maintain and strengthen existing agreements with agencies and non-profit organizations, including the Library District, to ensure progressive excellence in the facilities, programs, and services provided to the diverse and growing Cupertino population. POLICY RPC-6.3: ART AND CULTURE Utilize parks as locations of art and culture and to educate the community about the City’s history, and explore the potential to use art in facilities and utilities when located in parks. POLICY RPC-6.4: LIBRARY SERVICE Encourage the library to continue to improve service levels by incorporating new technology and expanding the library collections and services. GOAL RPC-6 Create and maintain a broad range of recreation programs and services that meet the needs of a diverse population CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-31 POLICY RPC-7.1: SUSTAINABLE DESIGN Ensure that City facilities are sustainably designed to minimize impacts on the environment. POLICY RPC-7.2: FLEXIBILITY Design facilities to be flexible to address changing community needs. POLICY RPC-7.3: MAINTENANCE Design facilities to reduce maintenance, and ensure that facilities are maintained and upgraded adequately. GOAL M-1 Actively participate in regional planning processes to coordinate local planning and to advocate for decisions that meet and complement the needs of Cupertino GOAL RPC-7 Provide high-quality, flexible and well- maintained community facilities that meet the changing needs of the community and are a source of community identity CHAPTER 9: RECREATION, PARKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES ELEMENT general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RPC-32 COMMUNITY SERVICES Community services policies seek to enhance the quality of community services through partnerships and information sharing with providers. POLICY RPC-8.1: SCHOOL DISTRICTS Partner with school districts to allow community use of their sports fields and facilities. STRATEGIES: RPC-8.1.1: Shared Facilities. Maintain and enhance arrangements with schools for the use of sports fields, theaters, meeting spaces and other facilities through maintenance agreements and other partnerships. RPC-8.1.2: School Expansion. Encourage schools to meet their expansion needs without reducing the size of their sports fields. RPC-8.1.3: School Facility Needs. Collaborate with schools on their facility needs through sharing of development information and partnerships through major development projects. GOAL RPC-8 Cooperate with school districts to share facilities and meet community needs land use definitionsAappendix a: CONTENTS: A-2 Introduction A-2 Land Use Categories Residential Commercial/Residential Neighborhood Commercial/Residential Office Commercial/Office/Residential Industrial/Residential Industrial/Commercial/Residential Office/Industrial/Commercial/Residential Quasi-Public/Institutional Parks and Open Space Riparian Corridor Public Facilities Transportation Monta Vista Neighborhood Land Use Designation APPENDIX A: LAND USE DEFINITIONS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) INTRODUCTION The Land Use Map (Figure A-1) of Community Vision 2040 illustrates the policies in this element and in other elements that play a major role in guiding urban development. The map cannot be used alone because it illustrates the text, which should be used along with it. The Land Use Map illustrates the general form of Cupertino in terms of land use patterns and intensity of land use activities. In contrast, the Municipal Zoning Map divides the city into very precisely drawn land use categories. Zoning districts have precisely written standards governing permitted activities and development forms. A series of policy statements accompany the planning text to guide the public and government officials in establishing precise zoning boundaries and pinpoint permitted activities. California law requires that the zoning map and zoning regulations be consistent with the Land Use Map and text. The zoning map and regulations must be brought into conformity with Community Vision 2040 within a reasonable period after it is adopted. LAND USE CATEGORIES Patterns and symbols, defined on the map legend, are used on the Land Use Map to identify land use categories, the road system, major land features and significant public and private facilities. The following is a description of each land use category: RESIDENTIAL Areas suitable for dwellings, divided into five sub-categories based on dwelling unit density and expressed as the number of dwellings permitted on each acre. Maximum residential yield is calculated by multiplying the maximum dwelling unit density by the size of the lot in acres, excluding any public rights-of-way. Community Vision 2040 does not define whether the dwellings are to be owned or rented by their inhabitants or whether they are to be attached or detached. A-2 APPENDIX A: LAND USE DEFINITIONS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) A-3 Very Low Density: Intensity is based on applying one of four slope-density formula—Foothill Modified, Foothill Modified l/2 Acre, Semi-Rural 5 acre or Foothill 5-20 acre. This classification is intended to protect environmentally sensitive areas from extensive development and to protect human life from hazards related to flood, fire and unstable terrain. Low Density: 1-5 and 1-6 units on each acre. This category is intended to promote a suburban lifestyle of detached single-family homes. Planned residential communities can be incorporated into this category if the development form is compatible with adjoining residential development. Low/Medium Density: 5-10 units per acre. This category accommodates more intensive forms of residential development while still being compatible with the predominant single-family detached residential neighborhood. This development can be successfully incorporated into a single-family environment. Medium Density: 10-20 units per acre. This category provides greater opportunity for multiple-family residential developments in a planned environment. This range usually results in traffic volumes and buildings that are not compatible with single-family residential neighborhoods. These developments should be located on the edges of single-family residential communities where utility services and street networks are adequate to serve increased densities. Medium/High Density: 20-35 units per acre. This promotes a wide range of housing choices in multiple-family dwellings. The intensity requires that the category be used in corridors with access to services and transit. The development may result in structures with three or four levels and underground parking. This category offers opportunity for housing choice, especially for people who want a more urban environment. High Density: Greater than 35 units per acre. This promotes a wide range of housing choices in multiple-family dwellings. The intensity requires that the category be used only at locations with adequate utility services or transit or both. The development may result in structures with three or four levels and underground parking. This category offers maximum opportunity for housing choice, especially for people who want a city environment. APPENDIX A: LAND USE DEFINITIONS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL This designation allows primarily commercial uses and secondarily residential uses or a compatible combination of the two. Commercial use means retail sales, businesses, limited professional offices, and service establishments with direct contact with customers. This applies to commercial activities ranging from neighborhood convenience stores to regionally oriented specialty stores. Retail stores that would be a nuisance for adjoining neighborhoods or harmful to the community identity would be regulated by the commercial zoning ordinance and use permit procedure. Smaller commercial parcels in existing residential areas may be needed to provide local neighborhood serving retail; otherwise they may be redeveloped at residential densities compatible with the surroundings. Residential development is subject to the numerical caps and other policies described in the development priorities tables. NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL Neighborhood Commercial is a subset of the Commercial land use designation. This category includes retail activities, personal services and limited commercial offices that serve primarily the residents of adjacent neighborhoods. Residential living units may only be allowed as upper floor uses. OFFICE This designation encompasses all office uses referenced in the City’s Administrative and Professional Office Zone including administrative, professional and research and development activities. Prototype research and development is permitted if it is conducted along with the office functions of a business. Prototype R&D is defined as research and development activities that lead to the development of a new product or a new manufacturing and assembly process. Products developed, manufactured or assembled here are not intended to be mass-produced for sale at this location. Guidelines for Prototype Research and Development: The type, use and storage of hazardous material for prototype R&D or assembly is regulated by the Uniform Building Code, the Uniform Fire Code and any new ordinance or other regulation that controls hazardous materials. A-4 APPENDIX A: LAND USE DEFINITIONS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) The building must not present the appearance that a prototype R&D or assembly process is in place. There will be no exterior storage and receiving facilities will be small. Generally, no more than 25 percent of the total space occupied by the firm will be devoted to this activity. COMMERCIAL/OFFICE/RESIDENTIAL This designation applies to the mixed-use areas that are predominantly commercial and office uses. Supporting residential uses may be allowed to offset job growth, better balance the citywide jobs to housing ratio and when they are compatible with the primarily non-residential character of the area. Residential development is subject to the numerical caps and other policies (described in the Land Use and Community Design element). INDUSTRIAL/RESIDENTIAL This designation allows primarily industrial uses and secondarily residential uses or a compatible combination of the two. Industrial use refers to manufacturing, assembly and research and development. Administrative offices that support manufacturing and wholesaling are included. Housing may be allowed to offset job growth and better balance citywide jobs to housing ratio. Residential development is subject to the numerical caps and other policies (described in the Land Use and Community Design Element). INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL This designation allows primarily industrial uses and secondarily commercial uses or a compatible combination of the two. Industrial use refers to manufacturing, assembly and research and development. Administrative offices that support manufacturing and wholesaling are included. Housing may be allowed to offset job growth and better balance citywide jobs to housing ratio. Residential development is subject to the numerical caps and other policies (described in the Land Use and Community Design Element). A-5 APPENDIX A: LAND USE DEFINITIONS | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) A-6 OFFICE/INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL This designation applies to areas that are primarily office uses and industrial uses. Commercial uses should be ancillary and supportive of the office and industrial base with the exception of larger parcels, which may be used for regionally oriented stores. Residential development is subject to the numerical caps and other policies (described in the Land Use and Community Design Element). QUASI-PUBLIC/INSTITUTIONAL This designation applies to privately owned land involving activities such as a private utility, a profit or non-profit facility giving continuous patient care, an educational facility or a religious facility. PARKS AND OPEN SPACE This designation applies to land owned by the public and used for recreation. It is also applied to private open space and recreational lands. RIPARIAN CORRIDOR This designation applies to creek corridors if they are not part of a larger park or residential property. PUBLIC FACILITIES This designation applies to land used or planned to be used by a governmental entity for a public purpose. TRANSPORTATION This designation applies to streets, highways and rail corridors. MONTA VISTA NEIGHBORHOOD LAND USE DESIGNATION Residential: The Monta Vista neighborhood has three density ranges, which allow single family, duplex and multi-family housing types. Non-residential: The non-residential designations are the same as the rest of Cupertino. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) 1 appendix b: housing element technical report CONTENTS: B-3 Introduction B-9 Housing Needs Assessment B-59 Regional Housing Needs Determination B-61 Housing Constraints B-104 Housing Resources B-136 Analysis of Consistency with the General Plan B-140 Supplemental Materials B APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Cupertino is a unique community with a high quality of life, a renowned school system, and a robust high-technology economy. The long-term vitality of Cupertino and the local economy depend upon the availability of all types of housing to meet the community’s diverse housing needs. As Cupertino looks towards the future, increasing the range and diversity of housing options will be integral to the City’s success. Consistent with the goal of being a balanced community, this Housing Element continues the City’s commitment to ensuring new opportunities for residential development, as well as for preserving and enhancing our existing neighborhoods. The Housing Element Technical Report describes the City of Cupertino’s procedures and Municipal Code as of 2014. This Report does not limit the City’s ability to amend or repeal the procedures or ordinances so long as these changes are not inconsistent with the policies in this Report. 1.1 ROLE AND CONTENT OF HOUSING ELEMENT This Housing Element is a comprehensive eight-year plan to address the housing needs in Cupertino. The Housing Element is the City’s primary policy document regarding the development, rehabilitation, and preservation of housing for all economic segments of the population. Per State Housing Element law, the document must be periodically updated to: • Outline the community’s housing production objectives consistent with State and regional growth projections • Describe goals, policies and implementation strategies to achieve local housing objectives • Examine the local need for housing with a focus on special needs populations • Identify adequate sites for the production of housing serving various income levels • Analyze potential constraints to new housing production • Evaluate the Housing Element for consistency with other General Plan elements Housing element law continually evolves. This element for the 2014-2022 planning period addresses all laws adopted since the element was last updated in 2010. SB 812 requires that the City assess the housing needs of developmentally disabled persons. SB 244, which does not pertain to the housing B-3 INTRODUCTION APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) element per se but is triggered by a housing element update, requires that cities and counties address the infrastructure needs of disadvantaged unincorporated communities within the jurisdiction’s designated sphere of influence. According to data from the California Department of Water Resources, Cupertino contains no disadvantaged communities within its sphere of influence. This updated Housing Element focuses on housing needs from January 31, 2015 through January 31, 2023, in accordance with the housing element planning period for San Francisco Bay Area jurisdictions established by State law. RELATIONSHIP TO THE GENERAL PLAN State law requires that a General Plan and its constituent elements “comprise an integrated, internally consistent and compatible statement of policies.” This implies that all elements have equal legal status; no one element is subordinate to any other element. This Housing Element must be consistent with the policies and proposals set forth by the General Plan, including the Land Use and Circulation Elements. Additionally, environmental constraints identified in the Health and Safety Element and the Environmental Resources/Sustainability Element are recognized in the Housing Element. When an element in the General Plan is amended, the Housing Element will be reviewed and modified as necessary to ensure continued consistency among the various elements. The City will ensure that updates to these elements achieve internal consistency with the Housing Element as well. 1.2 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION This Housing Element has been developed with extensive participation from members of the Cupertino community. The public participation process described below engaged a diverse set of community stakeholders in a productive dialogue on housing issues. Participants included community members, property owners, housing developers, service providers, school districts, and the business community. Meeting and workshop announcements and agendas, as well as presentation materials and web cast archives of all stakeholder and community meetings, were posted on the City’s website. A postcard advertising meetings (February 19, March 4, March 11, and April 1) was direct mailed to all Cupertino addresses to ensure that all economic segments of the community were invited to participate. Email notification for all meetings was sent to persons requesting information B-4 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-5 about the General Plan Update (over 300 persons). The paragraphs below summarize the outreach activities and meetings in more detail. STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS To inform the Cupertino Housing Element update and identify key housing needs, issues, and opportunities, the update team interviewed approximately 25 stakeholders. Most of the stakeholders were interviewed in small groups organized by interest, including community advocates, economic development, service providers, school districts, and property owners/developers. The team conducted six group interviews and one individual interview. To ensure that the concerns of low- and moderate-income and special needs residents were addressed, agencies and organizations that serve the low- and moderate-income and special needs community were invited to participate in the stakeholder interviews. Section 7 includes a list of invited and interviewed parties as well as a summary of key themes and findings. JOINT PLANNING COMMISSION/HOUSING COMMISSION WORKSHOP On January 23, 2014 the Planning Commission and Housing Commission hosted a joint workshop to begin discussion on potential housing sites. Eleven participants broke into small groups and identified potential future sites and the criteria for increasing density in certain areas. HOUSING COMMISSION WORKSHOP On February 12, 2014, the Housing Commission hosted a workshop to continue the sites discussion and prioritize sites for inclusion in the Housing Element. Following a project update presentation, the 15 participants broke into groups to prioritize potential housing sites, with the goal of showing adequate capacity to achieve a housing production goal of 1,064 units, consistent with Cupertino’s Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) for 2014-2022. PLANNING COMMISSION OPEN HOUSE AND STUDY SESSION On February 19, 2014, the Planning Commission hosted an open house and study session to provide a public forum to continue the Housing Element sites discussion. A public hearing was conducted on the item and the Planning Commission recommended criteria to focus the sites selection. Specifically, the Commission recommended removing sites that were viewed as inviable (successful shopping centers, sites with existing established institutional uses, APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) and small sites with low yield or no property owner interest). The Planning Commission recommended including sites that would further three goals: • Distribute housing throughout the city • Encourage development along the Priority Development Area designated by the One Bay Area plan • Minimize impacts to schools CITY COUNCIL STUDY SESSION On March 4, 2014 the City Council held a study session to discuss the potential housing sites that would be analyzed in the environmental document to be prepared for the Housing Element update and parallel amendments to the Land Use and Circulation Elements. A public hearing was conducted and community members had the opportunity to comment on the Housing Element and housing sites. HOUSING COMMISSION MEETING ON HOUSING POLICY On March 19, 2014, the Housing Commission held a study session to discuss revisions to housing goals, policies, and strategies associated with the Housing Element update. A public hearing was conducted on the item and five community members attended. JOINT CITY COUNCIL/PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING ON HOUSING POLICY On April 1, 2014, the Planning Commission and City Council held a joint study session to discuss revisions to housing goals, policies, and strategies included in the Housing Plan section of the 2014-2022 Housing Element. A public hearing was conducted on the item and community members had the opportunity to comment on the Housing Element Housing Plan. COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS A community open house was held on September 16, 2014 to review goals, policies, and strategies outlined in the Housing Element and General Plan Amendment. In response to community concerns regarding housing and development, the City hosted a community workshop on November 20, 2014 to answer questions regarding the Housing Element and State Law requirements. At the workshop, the community was invited to participate in a discussion regarding the Housing Element requirements and the General Plan. B-6 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-7 DRAFT HOUSING ELEMENT HEARINGS On August 28, 2014, the Housing Commission reviewed the Draft Housing Element. On October 14 and 20, the Planning Commission reviewed and commented on the Draft Housing Element. On November 10, December 2, and December 3, 2014, the City Council reviewed the Draft Housing Element and authorized staff to forward the draft to the State Department of Housing and Community Development for their review. 1.3 INCORPORATION OF COMMUNITY FEEDBACK At the February 19, 2014 Planning Commission open house and study session, participants emphasized that future development should reflect the character of the City and neighborhoods in which they are located. They also expressed the need to distribute housing throughout Cupertino and for smaller unit affordable rental housing. In response, the range of residential sites inventory studied in included sites outside the City’s core as a means to distribute housing production citywide. The Housing Element also includes Policy HE-2.2: Range of Housing Types, which encourages the development of diverse housing stock that provides a range of housing types (including smaller, moderate cost housing) and affordability levels. A concern about the viability of mixed use was also expressed during the community outreach activities. Participants and decision makers noted that developers are interested in developing the residential portion of a project and do not include substantial commercial uses. To reflect this concern, the site suitability analysis—conducted to identify appropriate sites for inclusion in the Housing Element—used locational criteria to select sites that could best facilitate mixed use development, especially at corner properties where commercial uses are most viable. Participants at the March 19, 2014 Housing Commission Study Session suggested that energy conservation mechanisms can provide cost savings and result in more affordable housing costs. Existing goals and policies support energy conservation for all residential construction. In addition, the City will evaluate the potential to provide incentives for affordable development to exceed the minimum requirements of the California Green Building Code. Community members and property owners were particularly involved in the site inventory. The inventory of residential opportunity sites was developed in consultation with the Housing Commission, Planning Commission, City Council, APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) and members of the public. At numerous meetings, commissioners and council members, as well as members of the public, discussed the inventory. During these discussions, several sites were removed and new sites were added based on input from stakeholders. Decisions to add or remove sites were based on realistic expectations for sites to be redeveloped within the planning period. School impacts were a common theme during the site selection process. Staff explained to participants and decision makers that impact to schools may not be a goal of the site selection exercise since Government Code Section 65995 preempts this issue. This law states that school impact mitigation fees are presumed to fully mitigate any school impacts associated with development. To ensure the long-term sustainability of the schools in tandem with the preservation and development of vibrant residential areas, Strategy HE-7.3.1 in the Housing Plan directs the City to continue to coordinate with the Cupertino Union School District (CUSD), Fremont Union High School District (FUHSD), and Santa Clara Unified School District (SCUSD). 1.4 ORGANIZATION OF HOUSING ELEMENT Following this introduction, the Housing Element includes the following components: • An analysis of the City’s current and future housing needs • An analysis of governmental and non-governmental constraints to housing production • An inventory and analysis of housing resources • A housing plan setting forth goals, policies, strategies, and quantified objectives to address the City’s housing needs Included at the end of this appendix is a thematic summary of the stakeholder interviews, a review of the prior (2007-2014) Housing Element, and a parcel- specific residential sites inventory. B-8 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-9 2. HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT The Housing Needs Assessment describes the housing, economic, and demographic conditions in Cupertino; assesses the demand for housing for households at all income levels; and documents the demand for housing to serve special needs populations. The Housing Needs Assessment is intended to assist Cupertino in developing housing goals and formulating policies and strategies that address local housing needs. To facilitate an understanding of how the characteristics of Cupertino are similar to, or different from, other nearby communities, this Housing Needs Assessment presents data for Cupertino alongside comparable data for all of Santa Clara County and, where appropriate, for the San Francisco Bay Area and the state of California. This Needs Assessment incorporates data from numerous sources, including: • United States Census Bureau and American Community Surveys (ACS) • Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) • State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) • State of California Departments of Finance • State of California Employment and Development Department • State of California Department of Social Services • State of California Department of Public Health • United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) • Housing Authority of the County of Santa Clara • Santa Clara County Homeless Census • Veronica Tam and Associates (Housing Element Consultant) • City of Cupertino Community Development Department (CDD) • 211 Santa Clara County • Craigslist.org • Zillow.com • DQNews.com Specific data sources are identified in each table or figure. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) 2.1 REGIONAL CONTEXT Cupertino is a suburban city of 10.9 square miles located in Santa Clara County. The City incorporated in 1955 and grew from a small agricultural community into a suburban place during the expansion of Silicon Valley. The cities of Los Altos and Sunnyvale limit any potential of expansion of Cupertino to the north, the cities of Santa Clara and San Jose abut Cupertino to the east, and Saratoga is to the immediate west. Unincorporated areas of Santa Clara County form the southern and western boundaries of the City. Cupertino’s built environment is dominated by single-family subdivisions, with distinctive commercial and employment centers separated from the surrounding residential areas. Because of the suburban pattern, the city has a largely automobile-based land use and transportation system. Highway 85 functions as the main north/south traffic route through the city, and Interstate 280 is a major east/west route. 2.2 POPULATION & HOUSEHOLD TRENDS POPULATION As presented in Table 2.1, between 2000 and 2010 the City of Cupertino’s population increased by 15.3 percent, which is at a higher rate than Santa Clara County at 5.9 percent, San Francisco Bay area as a whole at 5.4 percent, and the State of California at 10 percent. During this period, Cupertino grew from 50,546 to 58,302 persons. An increase of 15.3 percent, this growth was much more significant than the growth experienced by the region overall. However, a portion of this population growth can be attributed to the City’s annexation of 168 acres of land between 2000 and 2008. Cupertino’s annexation of Garden Gate, Monta Vista, and scattered County “islands” added 1,600 new residents. After removing the population increases from these annexations, the City of Cupertino experienced a 12-percent increase in its population during the previous decade. B-10 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.1: Population and Household Trends, 2000-2010/2011 2000 2010/2011 Total Change 2000-2010 Percent Change 2000-2011 City of Cupertino Population 50,546 58,302 7,756 15.3% Households 18,204 20,181 1,977 10.9% Average Household Size (a)2.75 2.83 Household Type (a) Families 74.8%77.4% Non-Families 25.2%22.6% Tenure Owner 63.6%62.6% Renter 36.4%37.4% Santa Clara County Population 1,682,585 1,781,642 99,057 5.9% Households 565,863 604,204 38,341 6.8% Average Household Size (a)2.92 2.89 Household Type (a) Families 69.9%70.8% Non-Families 30.1%29.2% Tenure Owner 59.8%57.6% Renter 40.2%42.4% Bay Area (b) Population 6,783,760 7,150,739 366,979 5.4% Households 2,466,019 2,608,023 142,004 5.8% Average Household Size (a)2.69 2.69 Household Type (a) Families 64.7%64.8% Non-Families 35.3%35.2% Tenure Owner 57.7%56.2% Renter 42.3%43.8% California Population 33,871,648 37,253,956 3,382,308 10.0% Households 11,502,870 12,577,498 1,074,628 9.3% Average Household Size (a)2.87 2.91 Household Type (a) Families 68.9%68.6% Non-Families 31.1%31.4% Tenure Owner 56.9%55.9% Renter 43.1%44.1% Notes: (a) Average household size and household type figures from American Community Survey (ACS), 2007-2011. (b) Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. B-11 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-12 HOUSEHOLDS A household is defined as a person or group of persons living in a housing unit, as opposed to persons living in group quarters, such as dormitories, convalescent homes, or prisons. According to the American Community Survey (ACS), there were 20,181 households in Cupertino in 2010 (see Table 2.1). The City added approximately 2,000 new households between 2000 and 2010, an increase of 11 percent. Approximately 600 of these households, however, resulted from annexations. After adjusting for household increases due to annexation, the number of households in Cupertino grew by only eight percent between 2000 and 2010. During the same time period, the number of households increased by 6.8 percent in Santa Clara County, 5.8 percent in the Bay Area as a whole and 9.3 percent in the State of California. AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE Average household size is a function of the number of people living in households divided by the number of occupied housing units in a given area. In Cupertino, the average household size in 2011 was 2.83, slightly higher than the Bay Area as a whole at 2.69, but slightly lower than Santa Clara County at 2.89 and the State of California at 2.91 (see Table 2.1). Because population growth has outpaced the increase in households in Cupertino, the average household size has increased since 2000. The contrary is true for the County. HOUSEHOLD TYPE Households are divided into two different types, depending on their composition. Family households are those consisting of two or more related persons living together. Non-family households include persons who live alone or in groups of unrelated individuals. As shown in Table 2.1, Cupertino has a large proportion of family households. In 2011, family households comprised 77.4 percent of all households in the city. Cupertino’s family households figure is higher than Santa Clara County’s family households figure at 70.8 percent and the Bay Area as a whole at 64.8 percent and the State of California at 68.6 percent. As of 2011, Cupertino’s non-family households comprised of 22.6 percent of all households in the city. Cupertino’s 22.6 percent is lower than Santa Clara County at 29.2 percent and the Bay Area as a whole at 35.2 percent and State of California at 31.4 percent. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) HOUSEHOLD TENURE Households in Cupertino are more likely to own than rent their homes. According to Table 2.1, 62.6 percent of Cupertino households owned their homes in 2010, a minimal decrease from 2000. Comparing the City of Cupertino with other jurisdictions, as of 2010, 57.6 percent owned their home in Santa Clara County, 56.2 percent in the Bay Area as a whole and 55.9 percent in the State of California. As of 2010, renter households comprised 37.4 percent of all households in Cupertino, 42.4 percent in Santa Clara County, 43.8 percent in the Bay Area as a whole and 44.1 percent in the State of California. AGE DISTRIBUTION Cupertino’s age distribution, shown in Table 2.2, is relatively similar to that of Santa Clara County, with a few notable exceptions. In both Cupertino and Santa Table 2.2: Age Distribution, 2000-2010 Age Cohort City of Cupertino Santa Clara County 2000 2010 2000 2010 Under 15 22.4%22.5%20.9%20.2% 15 to 17 4.3%5.1%3.9%3.9% 18 to 20 2.5%2.8%3.9%3.8% 21 to 24 2.7%2.8%5.4%5.1% 25 to 34 12.1%8.6%17.8%15.1% 35 to 44 21.0%18.2%17.6%15.6% 45 to 54 15.4%17.3%13.0%14.8% 55 to 64 8.7%10.2%8.0%10.4% 65 to 74 5.8%6.2%5.2%6.0% 75 to 84 3.8%4.0%3.3%3.5% 85 +1.4%2.2%1.1%1.5% Median Age 37.9 39.9 34.0 36.2 Sources: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. B-13 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Clara County, persons under 20 years old make up over a quarter of the overall population. In the City, the number and proportion of persons in this age group have increased slightly since 2000. However, compared to the County as a whole, Cupertino has a lower proportion of younger adults in the 25 to 34 age range but a higher proportion of older adults (persons 45 to 54 years old). In fact, from 2000 to 2010, the fastest growing segment of the Cupertino community was older adults in the 45 to 54 year old age category, which increased from 15.4 to 17.3 percent of the total population. In contrast, the proportion of other adults (those in the 25 to 44 age cohort) showed the sharpest decline between 2000 and 2010. In addition, Cupertino’s elderly population, residents age 65 and above, increased from 11 percent to 13 percent between 2000 and 2010. In 2010, the median age in Cupertino was 39.9, an increase from 37.9 in 2000. Santa Clara County experienced a similar aging of its population during this time period, as evidenced by an increase in the median age from 34.0 to 36.2 years. HOUSEHOLD INCOME According to American Community Survey (ACS) estimates, the median household income in Cupertino in 2011 was $124,825. This figure is significantly higher than the estimated median household income of $89,064 for Santa Clara County.3 Furthermore, 62.3 percent of Cupertino households earned more than $100,000 in 2011, whereas only 45.0 percent of Santa Clara households and 39.0 percent of Bay Area households fall into this income category. On a per capita basis, Cupertino is also wealthier than Santa Clara County. In 2011, the per capita income in Cupertino was $51,965, compared to $40,698 in the County. Table 2.3 summarizes the distribution of household incomes for Cupertino, Santa Clara County, and the Bay Area. The Housing Element law establishes five income categories according to Area Median Income (AMI) for purposes of evaluating housing assistance needs: • Extremely Low Income (0-30 percent AMI) • Very Low Income (31-50 percent AMI) • Low Income (51-80 percent AMI) • Moderate Income (81-120 percent AMI) • Above Moderate Income (>120 percent AMI) 3 Median household income and per capita income data are calculated fields by the Census Bureau based on raw data from the American Community Surveys. Without access to the raw data, median and per capita income cannot be calculated for customized region not identified as a Census Designated Place. B-14 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.3: Household Income Distribution, 2011 Household Income Cupertino Santa Clara County Bay Area (a) Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Less than $24,999 1,844 9.1%79,057 13.2%404,254 15.7% $25,000 to $49,999 1,933 9.6%90,027 15.0%440,575 17.1% $50,000 to $74,999 1,965 9.7%84,594 14.1%403,087 15.6% $75,000 to $99,999 1,874 9.3%75,974 12.7%324,123 12.6% $100,000 or more 12,560 62.3%269,998 45.0%1,005,441 39.0% Total 20,176 100.0%599,652 100.0%2,577,480 100.0% Median Household Income $124,825 $89,064 (b) Per Capita Income $51,965 $40,698 (b) Notes: (a) Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. (b) Median income data cannot be calculated from the ACS for Bay Area. Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. Table 2.4: Households by Income Category, 2010 Income Category (% of County AMI) Cupertino Santa Clara County Households Percent Households Percent Extremely Low (30% or less)1,485 7.6%75,395 12.6% Very Low (31 to 50%)1,320 6.7%61,830 10.4% Low (51 to 80%)1,260 6.4%56,325 9.4% Moderate or Above (over 80%)15,515 79.2%403,195 67.6% Total 19,580 100.0%596,745 100.0% Source: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS), based on American Community Survey (ACS), 2006-2010. Note: Data sources differ in Tables 2.3 and 2.4 resulting in slight deviations in totals. B-15 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) The State and Federal governments classify household income into various groups based upon its relationship to the County AMI and adjusted for household size. In 2010, 79.2 percent of Cupertino households earned moderate or above- moderate incomes, and only 20.8 percent of households earned lower incomes (see Table 2.4)4. In comparison, 67.6 percent of County households earned moderate or above-moderate incomes and 32.4 percent earned lower incomes, including 12.6 percent who earned extremely low incomes. 2.3 EMPLOYMENT TRENDS & JOBS/HOUSING BALANCE LOCAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Since 2000 there has been a net increase of over 1,200 jobs held by Cupertino residents, for a total of 25,200 employed residents in 2011. As shown in Table 2.5, the number of jobs held by Cupertino residents grew by 5.2 percent between 2000 and 2011. The City of Cupertino job growth percentage was far greater than the growth experienced by Santa Clara County as a whole at 0.8 percent between 2000 and 2011. Despite this overall growth, most industry sectors experienced a decline in the number of jobs available. Between 2000 and 2011 the largest job losses in employment occurred in the manufacturing and retail trade sectors. These decreases were offset by growth in the professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste management services industry, which added 1,748 jobs, and the educational, health, and social services industry, which added 1,144 jobs. Even with the recent changes to employment sectors during the previous decade, manufacturing remains the largest job sector for residents of both Cupertino and Santa Clara County. As of 2011, manufacturing jobs comprise 28.1 percent of all jobs held by Cupertino residents and 19.6 percent of jobs held by residents of Santa Clara County overall. The manufacturing sector includes the production of computer, electronic, and communication equipment, with such major employers as Apple and Hewlett-Packard. 4 Data were obtained from the Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) prepared for HUD by the Census Bureau using 2006-2010 American Community Survey (ACS) data. B-16 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.5: Jobs by Sector, 2000-2011 Industry Sector Cupertino Santa Clara County 2000 2011 2000 2011 Jobs % Total Jobs % Total % Change Jobs % Total Jobs % Total % Change Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining 76 0.3%36 0.1%-52.6%4,364 0.5%4,425 0.5%1.4% Construction 642 2.7%420 1.7%-34.6%42,232 5.0%47,005 5.5%11.3% Manufacturing 7,952 33.2%7,077 28.1%-11.0%231,784 27.5%167,034 19.6%-27.9% Wholesale trade 628 2.6%545 2.2%-13.2%25,515 3.0%20,252 2.4%-20.6% Retail trade 2,056 8.6%1,540 6.1%-25.1%83,369 9.9%81,918 9.6%-1.7% Transportation and warehousing, and utilities 383 1.6%425 1.7%11.0%23,546 2.8%23,578 2.8%0.1% Information 1,462 6.1%1,370 5.4%-6.3%39,098 4.6%32,627 3.8%-16.6% Finance, insurance, real estate, and rental and leasing 1,246 5.2%1,368 5.4%9.8%38,715 4.6%44,015 5.2%13.7% Professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste management services 4,667 19.5%6,415 25.5%37.5%131,015 15.5%152,960 18.0%16.7% Educational, health, and social services 3,063 12.8%4,207 16.7%37.3%123,890 14.7%157,349 18.5%27.0% Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services 832 3.5%734 2.9%-11.8%49,186 5.8%60,638 7.1%23.3% Other services (except public administration)590 2.5%715 2.8%21.2%29,987 3.6%36,330 4.3%21.2% Public administration 362 1.5%351 1.4%-3.0%21,211 2.5%22,421 2.6%5.7% Total 23,959 100.0%25,203 100.0%5.2%843,912 100.0%850,552 100.0%0.8% Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. B-17 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) With the 2008-2012 collapse of the financial and credit markets and the worldwide recession, Cupertino and the broader Silicon Valley region lost some of the gains in key sectors that were achieved between 2003 and 2007. The impacts of the economic downturn, although serious, were somewhat localized to particular sectors and industries such as construction, manufacturing, and retail/wholesale trade. Fortunately for Cupertino, high-tech employment did not decline at the same rate as the rest of the economy, and long-term prospects for this sector remain strong. UNEMPLOYMENT According to unemployment data provided by the State of California Employment Development Department, as of February 2014, the City of Cupertino had an unemployment rate of approximately 3.9 percent. The unemployment rate for the City was less than that of the County as a whole (6.1 percent). Since 2008, the unemployment rate has remained stable in both the City and the County, which had unemployment rates of 3.8 percent and 6.0 percent, respectively, at that time. LONG-TERM PROJECTIONS Table 2.6 presents population, household, and job growth projections for Cupertino, Santa Clara County, and the nine-county Bay Area region between 2010 and 2040. The figures represent the analysis conducted by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) using 2010 Census data and a variety of local sources. Cupertino’s population is expected to grow by 12,898 residents—from 58,302 in 2010 to 71,200 in 2040. This translates into an increase of 22 percent over 30 years. ABAG projects both Santa Clara County and the ABAG region to experience much larger growth (36 percent and 31 percent over 30 years, respectively). Specifically, communities with lower housing costs have been experiencing influxes of residents in search of comparative affordable housing. As a community with high costs of housing, Cupertino has not experienced an influx of residents. Instead, Cupertino’s job growth is expected to continue to outpace population and household growth in Cupertino between 2010 and 2020, compounding the “jobs rich” nature of the City, resulting in a jobs-to-housing B-18 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.6: Population, Household, and Job Projections, 2010-2040 2010 2020 2030 2040 2010-2020 2020-2030 2030-2040 City of Cupertino Population 58,302 62,100 66,300 71,200 6.5%6.8%7.4% Households 20,181 21,460 22,750 24,040 6.3%6.0%5.7% Jobs 26,090 29,960 31,220 33,110 14.8%4.2%6.1% Santa Clara County Population 1,781,642 1,977,900 2,188,500 2,423,500 11.0%10.6%10.7% Households 604,204 675,670 747,070 818,400 11.8%10.6%9.5% Jobs 926,270 1,091,270 1,147,020 1,229,520 17.8%5.1%7.2% Bay Area (a) Population 6,432,288 7,011,700 7,660,700 8,394,700 9.0%9.3%9.6% Households 2,350,186 2,560,480 2,776,640 2,992,990 8.9%8.4%7.8% Jobs 3,040,110 3,579,600 3,775,080 4,060,160 17.7%5.5%7.6% Notes: (a) Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. ratio of 1.40 by 2020 (up from 1.29 in 2010) but mirroring the regional average of 1.40. Furthermore, job growth is projected to level off after 2020 to a comparable pace with population and household growth. Similar trends are also projected for the County and the ABAG region as a whole. 2.4 HOUSING STOCK CHARACTERISTICS HOUSING STOCK CONDITIONS The age of the housing stock in Cupertino is similar to that of Santa Clara County. As shown in Table 2.7, the largest proportion of homes in the city (26.7 percent) was built between 1960 and 1969. In both Cupertino and Santa Clara County, 1972 is the median year housing structures were built. Typically, unless carefully maintained, older housing can create health, safety, and welfare problems for its occupants. Even with normal maintenance, dwellings over 40 years of age can deteriorate and require significant rehabilitation. However, while Cupertino’s housing stock is older, most homes remain in relatively good condition, a testament to the relative wealth of the community and pride of home ownership. B-19 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Data on the number of units which lack complete plumbing and kitchen facilities are often used to assess the condition of a jurisdiction’s housing stock. As Table 2.8 indicates, virtually all housing units contain complete plumbing and kitchen facilities. The 2007-2011 ACS indicates that less than one percent of the units lack these facilities. To characterize the physical conditions of Cupertino’s stock of older residential structures, a windshield survey was performed in 2009-2010 (inspecting exterior building components visible from the public right-of-way only). The windshield survey was conducted for the Rancho Rinconada residential neighborhood in the eastern part of Cupertino. This neighborhood, which is bordered by Lawrence Expressway, Bollinger Road, Miller Avenue, and Stevens Creek Boulevard, is one of the city’s older neighborhoods, with many small, single-story homes built in the 1950s. The windshield survey reported on the exterior condition of the housing units in this neighborhood, including a review of each unit’s foundation, roofing, siding and/or stucco, and windows. The survey concluded that over half of the several dozen homes surveyed had shingles missing from the roof, while nearly all had siding or stucco that needed to be patched and repainted. Many of the homes surveyed were characterized by a lack of maintenance, Table 2.7: Housing Structures Year Built, Cupertino, 2011 Year Built Cupertino Santa Clara County Number Percentage Number Percentage Built 2000 to Later 1,638 7.8%59,880 9.5% Built 1990 to 1999 2,520 12.0%63,429 10.1% Built 1980 to 1989 2,920 13.9%79,409 12.6% Built 1970 to 1979 4,374 20.8%143,847 22.9% Built 1960 to 1969 5,619 26.7%121,349 19.3% Built 1950 to 1959 3,216 15.3%100,795 16.0% Built 1940 to 1949 539 2.6%27,495 4.4% Built 1939 or earlier 232 1.1%33,244 5.3% Total 21,058 100.0%629,448 100.0% Median Year Built 1972 1972 Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. B-20 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.8: Housing Conditions, Cupertino, 2011 Number Percent of Total Plumbing Facilities Owners Complete Plumbing Facilities 12,900 63.9% Lacking Complete Plumbing Facilities 61 0.3% Renters Complete Plumbing Facilities 7,215 35.8% Lacking Complete Plumbing Facilities 0 0.0% Total 20,176 100.0% Kitchen Facilities Owners Complete Kitchen Facilities 12,923 64.1% Lacking Complete Kitchen Facilities 38 0.2% Renters Complete Kitchen Facilities 7,132 35.3% Lacking Complete Kitchen Facilities 83 0.4% Total 20,176 100.0% Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. B-21 with overgrown yards or garbage and debris on the property. No significant changes in the market conditions have occurred since the survey in 2009-2010 to have impacted the housing conditions in this neighborhood. The City offers rehabilitation assistance to lower and moderate income households to make necessary repairs and improvements. The City also operates a Code Enforcement program that is primarily complaint/ response driven. Between 2009 and 2014, Code Enforcement staff investigated APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) over 1,200 code violations. During investigation of complaints, Code Enforcement officers assess the primary complaint as well as other visible code violations. Based on recent statistics on code enforcement activities, typical code violations in the City include dilapidated structures, trash and debris, hazardous vegetation, and exterior storage. Most violations are able to be resolved within a relatively short timeframe. Depending on the type of code violations, Code Enforcement officers would refer homeowners to the City’s rehabilitation programs for assistance. Households are not displaced due to code enforcement activities unless there is a critical health and safety issue present. Since 2007, an estimated three residential units have been deemed unsafe due to health and safety issues. DISTRIBUTION OF UNITS BY STRUCTURE TYPE As shown in Table 2.9, a majority of housing units in Cupertino are single-family detached homes. As of 2013, 57.3 percent of total units in the City of Cupertino were single-family detached dwelling units (a decrease from the 61 percent recorded in 2000). As of 2013, the proportion of single-family homes in the City of Cupertino is still greater than Santa Clara County as a whole (54.1 percent) and the Bay Area as a whole at 53.6 percent. Large multi-family buildings (defined as units in structures containing five or more dwellings) represent the second largest housing category at 21.0 percent of the total number of units in Cupertino as of 2013. As of 2013, multi-family housing (5+ units) represented 25.5 percent of housing units in Santa Clara County and 25.1 percent in the Bay Area as a whole. Single-family attached homes comprised the third largest housing category in Cupertino, at 12.2 percent in 2013. By comparison, these homes made up 9.7 percent of the housing stock in all of Santa Clara County and 9.2 percent in the Bay Area as a whole. As of 2013, small multi-family homes (defined as units in structures containing 2 to 4 dwellings) represented 9.5 percent in the City of Cupertino, 7.7 percent in Santa Clara County and 9.9 percent in the Bay Area as a whole. B-22 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.9: Housing Units by Type, 2000-2013 2000 2013 Number of Units Percent of Total Number of Units Percent of Total Percent Change City of Cupertino Single Family Detached 11,425 61.1%12,056 57.3%5.5% Single Family Attached 2,028 10.8%2,561 12.2%26.3% Multi-family 2-4 units 1,663 8.9%2,002 9.5%20.4% Multi-family 5+ units 3,576 19.1%4,422 21.0%23.7% Mobile Homes 9 0.0%0 0.0%-100.0% Total 18,701 100.0%21,041 100.0%12.5% Santa Clara County Single Family Detached 323,913 55.9%346,145 54.1%6.9% Single Family Attached 52,739 9.1%62,201 9.7%17.9% Multi-family 2-4 units 46,371 8.0%48,923 7.7%5.5% Multi-family 5+ units 136,628 23.6%163,124 25.5%19.4% Mobile Homes 19,678 3.4%19,053 3.0%-3.2% Total 579,329 100.0%639,446 100.0%10.4% Bay Area Single Family Detached 1,376,861 53.9%1,505,153 53.6%9.3% Single Family Attached 224,824 8.8%258,633 9.2%15.0% Multi-family 2-4 units 266,320 10.4%278,450 9.9%4.6% Multi-family 5+ units 623,388 24.4%705,899 25.1%13.2% Mobile Homes 61,011 2.4%59,673 2.1%-2.2% Total 2,552,404 100.0%2,807,808 100.0%10.0% Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. B-23 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.10: Overcrowded Households, 2011 (a)(b) Owners Renters Total Overcrowded Households Percent Households Percent Households Percent Cupertino 1.51 or more persons per room (Severely Overcrowded)39 0.3%73 1.0%112 0.6% 1.01 to 1.50 (Overcrowded)246 1.9%700 9.7%946 4.7% 1.00 or Less 12,676 97.8%6,442 89.3%19,118 94.8% Total 12,961 100.0%7,215 100.0%20,176 100.0% % Overcrowded by Tenure 2.2%10.7%5.2% Santa Clara County 1.51 or more persons per room (Severely Overcrowded)2,755 0.8%11,799 4.8%14,554 2.4% 1.01 to 1.50 (Overcrowded)9,136 2.6%19,213 7.8%28,349 4.7% 1.00 or Less 340,006 96.6%216,743 87.5%556,749 92.8% Total 351,897 100.0%247,755 100.0%599,652 100.0% % Overcrowded by Tenure 3.4%12.5%7.2% ABAG Region 1.51 or more persons per room (Severely Overcrowded)9,620 0.7%40,161 3.6%49,781 1.9% 1.01 to 1.50 (Overcrowded)32,632 2.2%63,188 5.7%95,820 3.7% 1.00 or Less 1,434,779 97.1%997,100 90.6%2,431,879 94.4% Total 1,477,031 100.0%1,100,449 100.0%2,577,480 100.0% % Overcrowded by Tenure 2.9%9.4%5.6% Notes: (a) State HCD defines an overcrowded unit as one occupied by 1.01 persons or more (excluding bathrooms and kitchen). Units with more than 1.5 persons per room are considered severely overcrowded. (b) The 2010 Census does not contain detailed data on household conditions. Overcrowding data in this table are based on the American Community Survey (ACS), which is comprised of a series of small surveys for jurisdictions taken at different intervals based on population size. The 2000 Census overcrowding data were developed based on the 100 percent survey. Therefore, the significant changes between the 2000 Census and ACS may due in part to actual changes in overcrowding conditions, and in part to different survey methodologies. Sources: U.S. Census, American Community Survey (ACS), 2007-2011. B-24 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) OVERCROWDING Overcrowding refers to a household with an average of more than one person per room (including bedrooms and dining rooms but not kitchens or bathrooms). Units with more than 1.5 persons per room are considered to be severely overcrowded. As shown in Table 2.10, as of 2011 the total percentage of overcrowding by tenure represented 5.2 percent for Cupertino households, which is slightly lower compared to 7.2 percent in Santa Clara County. Overcrowding was much more common in Cupertino’s renter- occupied households, with 10.7 percent of these households considered to be overcrowded. By comparison, only 2.2 percent of owner-occupied households in the city were overcrowded. In Santa Clara County, 3.4 percent of owner-occupied households experienced overcrowding versus 12.5 percent of renter-households. Overcrowding conditions in Cupertino approximate regional averages, with a slightly higher level of overcrowding among renter-households than in the region. 2.5 MARKET CONDITIONS & INCOME RELATED TO HOUSING COSTS This section of the Needs Assessment provides information on market conditions for housing in Cupertino. This information is important because it reveals the extent to which the private housing market is providing for the needs of various economic segments of the local population. Available data on housing market conditions are combined with information on the demographics of the local population to identify those segments of the population that may face difficulties in securing affordable housing in Cupertino. RENTAL MARKET CHARACTERISTICS AND TRENDS A review of rental market conditions in Cupertino was conducted for this Housing Element by reviewing advertised apartment listings. As shown in Table 2.11, a total of 170 units were listed, the majority of which were one- and two- bedroom units. The survey found that market-rate rents averaged: • $1,608 per month for studio units • $2,237 per month for one-bedroom units • $2,886 per month for two-bedroom units • $3,652 per month for three-bedroom units B-25 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Rental prices in Cupertino ranged from $1,400 for a studio unit to $5,895 for a five-bedroom unit. As can be expected, smaller units are more affordable than larger units. The overall median rental price for all unit sizes was $2,830, and the average price was $2,919. HOME SALE TRENDS While other areas of the state and nation have experienced downturns in the housing market recently, Cupertino home values have continued to grow. During the depth of the housing market crash (between 2008 and 2010), median home price in Cupertino held steady at around $1,000,000. Since 2011, home prices in Cupertino have increased substantially. According to DQNews, the median sales price for single-family residences and condos increased by 28.6 percent from $933,000 in 2011 to $1,200,000 in 2013. As shown in Table 2.12, this increase was one of the highest in the region. Median home prices in Santa Clara County as a whole increased even more dramatically (by 36.5 percent) during the same time period. Figure B-1 shows that the City of Cupertino had the second highest median home sales price in the region during 2013 at $1,200,000, behind only the City of Saratoga at $1,600,000. The 2013 median home sales price of $1,200,000 in Cupertino was also nearly double that of the County median price ($645,000). Most recent sales data reported by DQNews.com compare sales records in the month of March 2014 with those in March 2013. Prices in Santa Clara County experienced a 15 percent increase over that one-year period, while Milpitas and Cupertino registered the largest B-26 Table 2.11: Overview of Rental Housing Market, Cupertino, 2014 (a) Size Number Advertised Median Rent Average Rent Rent Range Studio 5 $1,559 $1,608 $1,400-$1,800 One-Bedroom 44 $2,274 $2,237 $1,845-$2,567 Two-Bedroom 80 $2,844 $2,886 $1,950-$3,820 Three-Bedroom 33 $3,500 $3,652 $2,600-$4,595 Four-Bedroom 6 $4,999 $4,683 $3,700-$5,300 Five-Bedroom 2 $5,198 $5,198 $4,500-$5,895 Total 170 $2,830 $2,919 $1,400-$5,895 Note: (a) Search performed on Craigslist.org and Zillow.com of listings dated February 12 to March 7, 2014. Sources: Craigslist.org, 2014; Zillow.com, 2014. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.12: Annual Median Home Sale Prices, 2011-2013 Jurisdiction 2011 2012 2013 % Change 2011- 2012 % Change 2012- 2013 % Change 2011- 2013 Campbell $569,000 $625,000 $701,000 9.8%12.2%23.2% Cupertino $933,000 $1,045,750 $1,200,000 12.1%14.8%28.6% Mountain View $678,500 $769,250 $800,000 13.4%4.0%17.9% Santa Clara $500,000 $540,000 $635,000 8.0%17.6%27.0% Saratoga $1,377,500 $1,527,500 $1,600,000 10.9%4.7%16.2% Sunnyvale $570,000 $645,000 $767,500 13.2%19.0%34.6% Santa Clara County $472,500 $525,000 $645,000 11.1%22.9%36.5% Source: DQNews.com, 2014. B-27 increases in the County at 36 percent and 31 percent, respectively. Throughout 2014, Cupertino’s median home sale price has continued on this upward trend—as of June 2014, the median single-family home price in Cupertino was $1,550,000 and a townhome/condominium was selling for $822,500. While home prices in the city steadily increased, the number of homes being sold declined slightly between 2012 and 2013, from 530 units to 512 units (Figure B-2). Neighboring jurisdictions also experienced similar declines in sales volume, with the largest decrease occurring in Mountain View. Overall, the number of units sold in the County decreased slightly from 20,940 units in 2012 to 20,700 units in 2013, according to DQNews.com. VACANCY RATES AND TRENDS The 2010 Census data as reported in ABAG’s Housing Element Data Profiles indicate an overall vacancy rate of 4.0 percent in the City, which was slightly lower than the Santa Clara County vacancy rate of 4.4 percent (see Table 2.13). Specifically, Cupertino’s rental vacancy rate was reported at 4.7 percent, compared to a vacancy rate of less than one percent (0.8 percent) for ownership APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) $701,000 $1,200,000 $800,000 $635,000 $1,600,000 $767,500 $0 $200,000 $400,000 $600,000 $800,000 $1,000,000 $1,200,000 $1,400,000 $1,600,000 Campbell Cupertino Mountain View Santa Clara Saratoga Sunnyvale Santa Clara County: $645,000 B-28 0 500 1,000 1,500 2012 555 530 849 1,176 480 1,208 2013 554 512 759 1,214 448 1,326 Campbell Cupertino Mountain View Santa Clara Saratoga Sunnyvale HOME SALES VOLUME, 2012-2013 FIGURE B-2 FIGURE B-1 ANNUAL MEDIAN HOME SALE PRICE 2013 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-29 housing. While the rental vacancy rate increased notably from the 1.8 percent reported by the 2000 Census, the homeowner vacancy rate stayed essentially the same. Despite the increase, the local vacancy rates were still below optimum. Typically, industry standards consider a rental vacancy rate of five to six percent and a vacancy rate for ownership housing of one to two percent to be adequate to facilitate mobility. HOUSING AFFORDABILITY According to the federal government, housing is considered “affordable” if it costs no more than 30 percent of a household’s gross income. Often, affordable housing is discussed in the context of affordability to households with different income levels. Households are categorized as extremely low income, very low income, low income, median income, moderate income, or above moderate income based on percentages of the AMI established annually by the California Department of Housing and Community Development. Income limits also vary by household size. Table 2.14 provides the maximum income limits for a four- person household in Santa Clara County in 2014. Extremely low-, very low- and low-income households are eligible for federal, state, and local affordable housing programs. Moderate-income households are eligible for some state and local housing programs. These income categories are also used by ABAG in the Regional Housing Needs Allocation, or RHNA, process. In Cupertino, the Below Market Rate (BMR) Ordinance establishes an additional income range: median income (81 -100 percent of AMI). Another way to think of the household income categories is to consider what types of jobs people in these different categories might have. Figure B-3 provides representative households in Santa Clara County, along with hypothetical jobs and family compositions. ABILITY TO PURCHASE/RENT HOMES BY HOUSEHOLD INCOME Table 2.15 shows affordability scenarios by income and household size for Santa Clara County. The following analysis compares the maximum affordable housing costs for various households to the rental survey and median home sales price data for Cupertino shown earlier. The maximum affordable sales price was calculated using household income limits published by the California Department of Housing and Community Development, conventional financing terms, and assuming that households spend 30-35 percent of gross income on mortgage payments, taxes, and insurance. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-30 Table 2.13: Housing Occupancy and Vacancy Status, 2010 Cupertino Santa Clara County California Occupancy Status Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Occupied Housing Units 20,181 96.0%604,204 95.6%12,577,498 91.9% Vacant 846 4.0%27,716 4.4%1,102,583 8.1% For Rent 373 1.8%11,519 1.8%374,610 2.7% For Sale Only 108 0.5%5,067 0.8%154,775 1.1% Rented Or Sold, Not Occupied 76 0.4%2,222 0.4%54,635 0.4% For Seasonal, Recreational, or Occasional Use 125 0.6%3,000 0.5%302,815 2.2% For Migrant Workers 3 0.0%50 0.0%2,100 0.0% Other Vacant (a)161 0.8%5,858 0.9%213,648 1.6% Total 21,027 100.0%631,920 100.0%13,680,081 100.0% Homeowner Vacancy Rate 0.8%1.4%2.1% Rental Vacancy Rate 4.7%4.3%6.3% Notes: (a) If a vacant unit does not fall into any of the classifications specified above, it is classified as “other vacant.”For example, this category includes units held for occupancy by a caretaker or janitor, and units held by the owner for personal reasons. Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.14: Household Income Limits, Santa Clara County, 2014 Income Category % Of Area Median Income Top of Income Range (a) Extremely Low Income 0% to 30%$31,850 Very Low Income 31% to 50%$53,050 Low Income 51% to 80%$84,900 Moderate Income 81% to 120%$126,600 Santa Clara Median Income 100%$105,500 Notes: (a) Based on HCD 2014 Household Income Limits for households of four persons in Santa Clara County. Source: California Department of Housing and Community Development, 2014. B-31 Moderate Income Household (80% – 120% AMI) Estimated Annual Income: $84,900 - $126,000 Dad works as a paralegal, mom works as a home health aide; they have two children. Low Income Household (50% – 80% AMI) Estimated Annual Income: $53,050 - $84,900 Dad works as a security guard, mom works as a teaching assistant; they have two children. Very Low Income Household (Up to 50% AMI) Estimated Annual Income: Up to $42,050 Mom works as a file clerk and is the only source of financial support in her family; she has one child. Sources: California Employment and Development Department, 2014; and California Department of Housing and Community Development, 2014. FIGURE B-3 REPRESENTATIVE HOUSEHOLDS, SANTA CLARA, 2014 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) $152,925 $106,995 $59,719 $55,000 $54,296 $36,000 $23,795 $0 $50,000 $100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 $300,000 Management Engineering Education Protective Services Sales Healthcare Support Food Prep Income Needed to Rent an Apt. ($135,840) Income Needed to Buy a Home ($299,555) FIGURE B-4INCOME NEEDED TO AFFORD HOUSING COMPARED WITH INCOME B-32 When comparing the home prices and rents shown earlier in Table 2.11 and Table 2.12 with the maximum affordable housing costs presented in Table 2.15, it is evident that extremely low- and very low-income households in Cupertino have no affordable housing options. For example, a four-person very low income household could afford $1,084 a month for rent, but the average rent for a two-bedroom unit was $2,886, more than double what this household could afford. Even for low- and moderate-income households, adequately sized and affordable rental housing options are very limited. A four-person moderate income household could afford $2,928 monthly for rent, barely above the average rent of a two-bedroom unit. Homeownership is generally beyond the reach of most lower- and moderate-income households. As shown in Table 2.15, a four-person moderate income household could afford a home of approximately $625,800, just about half the price of a median-priced home in Cupertino. To augment this analysis, the household incomes of select occupations were analyzed to evaluate these workers’ ability to rent or purchase homes in Cupertino. Figure B-4 shows the average annual wages for a range of occupations in Santa Clara County, based on 2013 State Employment Development Department occupational employment and wage data. In general, low-paying occupations in the health care support and food preparation industries do not pay salaries high enough to allow their workers to afford APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.15: Maximum Affordable Housing Costs, Santa Clara County, 2013 (a, b, c) Annual Income Limits Affordable Housing Cost Utilities, Taxes, Insurance, HOA Dues Affordable Price Rent Ownership Utilities Renter Utilities Ownership Taxes/ Insurance Rent Sale Extremely Low Income (0-30% AMI) 1-Person $22,300 $558 $558 $137 $149 $195 $421 $41,840 2-Person $25,500 $638 $638 $160 $173 $223 $478 $47,330 3-Person $28,650 $716 $716 $182 $198 $251 $534 $52,465 4 Person $31,850 $796 $796 $242 $265 $279 $554 $49,524 5 Person $34,400 $860 $860 $290 $316 $301 $570 $47,649 Very Low Income (31-50% AMI) 1-Person $37,150 $929 $929 $137 $149 $325 $792 $89,158 2-Person $42,450 $1,061 $1,061 $160 $173 $371 $901 $101,340 3-Person $47,750 $1,194 $1,194 $182 $198 $418 $1,012 $113,325 4 Person $53,050 $1,326 $1,326 $242 $265 $464 $1,084 $117,076 5 Person $57,300 $1,433 $1,433 $290 $316 $501 1,143 $120,617 Low Income (51-80% AMI) 1-Person $59,400 $1,108 $1,292 $137 $149 $452 $973 $135,504 2-Person $67,900 $1,266 $1,477 $160 $173 $517 $1,106 $154,329 3-Person $76,400 $1,424 $1,662 $182 $198 $582 $1,242 $172,959 4 Person $84,900 $1,583 $1,846 $242 $265 $646 $1,341 $183,353 5 Person $91,650 $1,709 $1,994 $290 $316 $698 $1,419 $192,177 Median Income (81-100% AMI) 1-Person $73,850 $1,662 $1,939 $137 $149 $678 $1,525 $217,864 2-Person $84,400 $1,899 $2,216 $160 $173 $775 $1,739 $248,456 3-Person $94,950 $2,136 $2,492 $182 $198 $872 $1,954 $278,851 4 Person $105,500 $2,374 $2,769 $242 $265 $969 $2,132 $301,010 5 Person $113,950 $2,564 $2,991 $290 $316 $1,047 $2,274 $319,248 Moderate Income (101-120% AMI) 1-Person $88,600 $2,031 $2,369 $137 $149 $829 $1,894 $272,771 2-Person $101,300 $2,321 $2,708 $160 $173 $948 $2,161 $311,206 3-Person $113,950 $2,611 $3,046 $182 $198 $1,066 $2,429 $349,445 4 Person $126,600 $2,901 $3,385 $242 $265 $1,185 $2,659 $379,449 5 Person $136,750 $3,133 $3,656 $290 $316 $1,279 $2,843 $403,961 Notes: (a) This table is intended for general information purposes only. Any proposed BMR unit initial sales prices shall be determined by the City based on Health and Safety Code requirements and available interest rates/conditions at the time of sale. (b) Assumptions for rental scenarios: 2014 HCD income limits; affordable housing costs pursuant to California Health & Safety Code Section 50053(b)(1)(2)(3)(4); utilities based on Housing Authority of Santa Clara 2013 County Utility Allowance (c) Assumptions for ownership scenarios: 2014 HCD income limits; affordable housing costs pursuant to California Health & Safety Code Section 50052.5(b)(1)(2)(3)(4); 35% of monthly affordable cost for taxes, insurance, monthly mortgage insurance and HOA dues; 5% downpayment, 5% interest rate; conventional 30 year fixed rate mortgage loan; utilities based on Housing Authority of Santa Clara 2013 County Utility Allowance.Sources: California Department of Housing and Community Development, 2014; California Health & Safety Code, 2014; Housing Authority of the County of Santa Clara, 2013; Veronica Tam and Associates, 2014. B-33 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.16: Housing Cost Burden by Tenure and Household Type, Cupertino, 2010 (a) Household by Type, Income, and Housing Problem Renters Owners Total HouseholdsSeniorsSmall Families Large Families Total Seniors Large Families Total Extremely Low (0-30%)300 310 10 820 370 10 665 1,485 With any housing problem 61.7%69.4%100.0%64.6%55.4%100.0%61.7%63.3% With cost burden >30%61.7%69.4%100.0%64.6%55.4%100.0%61.7%63.3% With cost burden >50%45.0%62.9%100.0%56.1%27.0%100.0%44.4%50.8% Very Low (31-50%)75 300 25 485 555 40 835 1,320 With any housing problem 100.0%70.0%100.0%81.4%35.1%100.0%44.9%58.3% With cost burden >30%100.0%70.0%40.0%79.4%36.0%100.0%45.5%58.0% With cost burden >50%60.0%30.0%40.0%43.3%27.9%100.0%32.9%36.7% Low (51-80%)55 150 55 450 500 30 810 1,260 With any housing problem 100.0%76.7%100.0%76.7%31.0%0.0%45.7%56.7% With cost burden >30%100.0%66.7%90.9%72.2%31.0%0.0%42.6%53.2% With cost burden >50%100.0%43.3%72.7%46.7%21.0%0.0%30.2%36.1% Moderate/Above Moderate (>80%)265 3,515 385 5,170 1,990 1,025 10,345 15,515 With any housing problem 47.2%24.9%66.2%28.7%22.9%40.0%35.5%33.3% With cost burden >30%47.2%12.8%0.0%15.6%21.4%33.2%33.7%27.7% With cost burden >50%11.3%0.0%0.0%0.6%7.0%2.4%7.5%5.2% Total Households 695 4,275 475 6,925 3,415 1,105 12,655 19,580 With any housing problem 63.3%33.1%72.6%39.8%29.6%41.6%38.2%38.7% With cost burden >30%63.3%22.8%14.7%29.5%28.8%35.3%36.5%34.0% With cost burden >50%38.1%8.2%12.6%13.1%14.6%6.8%12.6%12.8% Notes: (a) Data presented in this table are based on special tabulations from 2006-2010 American Community Survey (ACS) data. Due to the small sample size, the margins for error can be significant. Interpretations of these data should focus on the proportion of households in need of assistance rather than on precise numbers. Source: HUD Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS), based on the 2006-2010 ACS. B-34 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-35 housing in Cupertino. In addition, while those employed in higher-paying occupations may earn more, they may still have difficulty purchasing an adequately sized home. OVERPAYMENT (COST BURDEN) According to Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) standards, a household is considered to be “cost-burdened” (i.e., overpaying for housing) if it spends more than 30 percent of gross income on housing-related costs. Households are “severely cost burdened” if they pay more than 50 percent of their income on housing cost. According to special data developed by the ACS for HUD, approximately 30 percent of renters and 37 percent of homeowners in Cupertino were overpaying for housing in 2010. By contrast, overpayment was much more common in Santa Clara County as a whole, with 42 percent of renters and 39 percent of homeowners classified as cost-burdened in 2010. Housing cost burden was particularly pronounced for extremely low- and very low-income households in Cupertino. In 2010, 51 percent of Cupertino’s extremely low-income renters and 37 percent of its very low-income renters were severely cost burdened. This finding is consistent with the analysis of the local housing market, which revealed a significant gap between home prices and rents and the income of lower income households. 2.6. ASSISTED HOUSING AT RISK OF CONVERSION State law requires local housing elements to include an inventory of affordable housing developments that could be at risk of conversion to market rates during the 10-year period that follows the adoption of the element. For those units found to be at risk of conversion, the element must estimate the cost to preserve or replace the at-risk units, to identify the resources available to help in the preservation or replacement of those units, and to identify those organizations that could assist in these efforts. INVENTORY OF EXISTING AFFORDABLE UNITS Table 2.17 presents the inventory of affordable housing units in Cupertino and indicates the earliest dates of termination of affordability restrictions for each project. In 2011, the 10 below market rate (BMR) units in the Chateau Cupertino development expired. However, the City is committed to maintaining the long- term affordability of current BMR units. As such, in 2005 the City increased the APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.17: Inventory of Affordable Housing Units Number of Affordable Units Household Income Funding Source Earliest Termination DateVery Low or Low Moderate Affordable Developments Sunny View West 22449 Cupertino Rd.100 100 0 HUD 202/811 3/31/2031 Stevens Creek Village 19140 Stevens Creek Blvd. 40 40 0 CHFA, HUD & HOME 6/30/2035 Le Beaulieu Apartments 10092 Bianchi Way 27 27 0 CalFHA/CDBG 2035 9/12/2015 WVCS Transitional Housing 10311-10321 Greenwood Ct. 4 4 0 CDBG 7/14/2026 Beardon Drive 10192-10194 Beardon Dr.8 8 0 CDBG 12/21/2024 Senior Housing Solutions 19935 Price Avenue 1 1 0 CDBG 6/24/2066 Maitri Transitional Housing Undisclosed Location 4 4 0 CDBG 3/16/2064 Total 184 184 0 B-36 minimum affordability term for BMR units in new developments to 99 years. Since 2010, 17 new units at the Markham Apartments have been added to the BMR inventory. UNITS AT RISK OF CONVERSION DURING NEXT TEN YEARS The affordable housing developments at risk of conversion to market rate during the next 10 years include those units whose affordability restrictions are set to expire January 31, 2025 or earlier. As presented in APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.17: Inventory of Affordable Housing Units (CONTINUED) Number of Affordable Units Household Income Funding Source Earliest Termination DateVery Low or Low Moderate Affordable Developments Biltmore Apartments 10159 South Blaney Ave.2 2 0 BMR 6/30/2029 Park Center Apartments 20380 Stevens Creek Blvd. 4 4 0 BMR 7/8/2026 The Hamptons 19500 Pruneridge Ave.34 34 0 BMR 10/20/2027 Arioso Apartments 19608 Pruneridge Ave. 20 20 0 BMR 1/29/2028 Forge-Homestead Apartments 20691 Forge Way 15 15 0 BMR 1/16/2027 Aviare Apartments 20415 Via Paviso 20 20 0 BMR 7/8/2026 The Markham Apartments 20800 Homestead Road 17 17 0 BMR 2039 Lake Biltmore 19500 Pruneridge Ave. 2 2 0 BMR 2029 Vista Village 101144 Vista Drive 24 24 0 BMR 11/29/2056 Total 138 138 0 Below Market Rate (BMR) For-Sale Units Total (a)122 0 122 BMR Notes: (a) Property addresses of BMR units are not listed in order to protect the privacy of homeowners. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014. B-37 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.17, the affordability restrictions for the eight-unit Beardon Drive project will expire in December 2024. In addition, certain affordability restrictions for Le Beaulieu Apartments are also set to expire during the next 10 years. Cupertino Community Housing originally developed Le Beaulieu in 1984 and utilized HUD project-based Section 8 assistance. Mid-Peninsula Housing Coalition, a nonprofit organization, acquired and rehabilitated the project in 1998. Le Beaulieu contains 27 one- and two-bedroom units for adults with physical disabilities who are able to live independently. All units are handicap accessible and affordable to very low-income households (less than 50 percent of AMI). The Le Beaulieu development is not considered to be at risk of converting to market rate because there are other funding sources tied to the property such as the City’s CDBG (30-year agreement) and CalHFA loan agreement. In addition, Mid-Peninsula Housing Coalition is committed to maintaining the property as affordable. Discussions with Mid-Peninsula Housing Coalition staff in early 2014 confirmed the organization is in the process of applying for a 20-year extension of the Section 8 contract. Renewal of Section 8 funding for senior and disabled housing has been prioritized by HUD and Mid-Peninsula Housing fully expects to be able to extend the Section 8 assistance. Furthermore, other affordability covenants on the project would require the project to remain as affordable housing well beyond this Housing Element planning period. One property has been identified with expiring affordability restriction during this planning period – the Beardon Drive development. In 1994, Community Housing Developers Inc., a nonprofit housing provider, received a loan from the City’s CDBG program for the acquisition of the Beardon Drive property. The loan agreement restricts the eight units for very low-income use for 30 years. As such, income restriction for this project would expire in 2024. As Beardon Drive is owned by a nonprofit housing provider, it is considered to be at low risk of converting to market-rate housing. Nevertheless, for the purpose of this Housing Element, options and costs to preserve these units are discussed below. PRESERVATION AND REPLACEMENT OPTIONS Typically, transferring the at-risk projects to nonprofit ownership would ensure the long-term affordability of the units. However, the Beardon Drive project is already owned by a nonprofit organization. Beardon Drive does not rely B-38 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) on ongoing rent subsidies (such as Section 8) to maintain affordable rents. A strategy to preserving this project as affordable housing is to ensure the financial status of the project (i.e., net operating income and reserve) is adequate to maintain the affordable rents. The City has included a strategy in the Housing Plan to provide rehabilitation assistance to affordable housing projects to upkeep the housing quality standards and to reduce ongoing maintenance and operating expenses. The City may also choose to extend the loan repayment schedule in exchange for an extended affordability covenant. Another strategy is to provide ongoing rental subsidies to the project. The estimated total amount needed to subsidize rents for existing tenants is shown in Table 2.18. Given the unit mix of all eight at-risk units, the total cost of subsidizing the rents for these units is estimated at $61,152 annually. For a 10- year affordability covenant, a total subsidy of more than $600,000 would be needed. CONSTRUCTION OF REPLACEMENT UNITS In the unlikely event that Community Housing Developers, Inc. chooses to convert Beardon Drive from an affordable housing project to market-rate housing, the construction of new affordable housing units as a means of replacing the currently at-risk units may be an option for Cupertino. The cost of developing housing depends upon a variety of factors including the density and size of the units (i.e. square footage and number of bedrooms), location, land costs, and type of construction. Based on general assumptions for average construction costs, it would cost approximately $940,000 to construct eight affordable replacement Table 2.18: Rental Subsidies Required for At-Risk Units Unit Size/Household Size Number of Units Fair Market Rent (a) Household Annual Income (b) Affordable Housing Cost (c) Monthly per Unit Subsidy (d) Total Monthly Subsidy Very Low Income (50% AMI) 2-Bedroom/3-person household 8 $1,649 $47,750 $1,012 $637 $5,096.00 Total Annual Subsidy $61,152 Notes: (a) Fair Market Rent (FMR) is determined by HUD. These calculations use the 2014 HUD FMR for Santa Clara County. (b) Rents are restricted to 50% AMI for this development, which puts residents in the Very Low Income Category, set by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), 2014. (c) The affordable housing cost is calculated based on 30% of the AMI, minus utilities for rentals. (d) The monthly subsidy covers the gap between the FMR and the affordable housing cost Source: Veronica Tam and Associates, 2014. B-39 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.19: Estimated New Construction Costs Unit Size (A)(B)(C)(D) Total Units Estimated Average Unit Size (sq. ft.) Estimated Gross Building Size Estimated Gross Building Costs 2 Bedroom 8 807 7,747 $941,963 Average Per Unit Cost:$117,745 Notes: (C) = (A) x (B) x 1.20 (i.e. 20% inflation to account for hallways and other common areas). (D) = (C) x $97.27 (per square foot construction costs) x 1.25 (i.e. 25% inflation to account for parking and landscaping costs).Source: Veronica Tam and Associates, 2014 B-40 units, excluding land costs and other soft costs (such as architecture and engineering), as shown in Table 2.19. When considering these additional costs, especially given the high cost of land in Cupertino, the total costs to develop replacement units would be significantly higher. FINANCIAL RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO THE CITY TO ASSIST IN PRESERVATION Clearly, the costs of preserving or replacing affordable housing units are substantial. In light of this challenge, the City must consider what resources are available to help preserve or replace those units so that lower-income tenants are not displaced in the event that affordable units convert to market rate. The City has access to a range of different funds that could potentially assist in a preservation effort, including: • City Below Market Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF) (approximately $6 million unencumbered as of 2014) • CDBG Entitlement Funds (approximately $150,000 unencumbered as of 2014) • Santa Clara County HOME Consortium Funds (available through a competitive application process after the City joins the Consortium in 2014) • Mortgage Revenue Bonds • State Grant Programs • Federal Grant Programs • Low Income Housing Tax Credits • HUD Section 8 “Mark to Market” Program APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-41 Once the City becomes aware of an impending conversion, staff will begin exploring the availability of funding from various sources. In many cases, the City will find it advantageous to collaborate with private affordable housing developers or managers to develop and implement a viable plan to preserve affordable housing units. Private developers can often bring additional expertise and access to funding, such as tax credits. The State Department of Housing and Community Development maintains a list of affordable housing developers and property managers who have expressed an interest in working with local communities to preserve affordable housing projects. This database lists organizations that are interested in working in any county within the State of California, including well-known affordable housing providers such as Mercy Housing, EAH, MidPen Housing, etc. The database also lists numerous organizations that have expressed interest in working on preservation projects in Santa Clara County in particular, including organizations such as BRIDGE Housing Corporation and Eden Housing. The organizations listed above are but a few of those listed in the HCD database that the City of Cupertino could consider as potential partners in the event that it becomes necessary to assemble a team to preserve an affordable housing project. 2.7. SPECIAL HOUSING NEEDS This section of the needs assessment profiles populations with special housing needs, including seniors, large households, single parent households, persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities), farm workers, persons living in poverty, and homeless persons. Table 2.20 summarizes the special needs groups in Cupertino SENIORS Many senior residents face a unique set of housing needs, largely due to physical limitations, fixed incomes, and health care costs. Affordable housing cost, unit sizes and accessibility to transit, family, health care, and other services are important housing concerns for the seniors. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-42 As Table 2.21 shows, in 2010, 19.7 percent of Cupertino householders were 65 years old or older, comparable to the proportion of senior households in Santa Clara County (18.5 percent). A large majority of these senior households owned their homes (80.3 percent). In Cupertino, homeownership is much more common among seniors than for any other age group. Just 58.2 percent of householders under 64 years old owned their homes. Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data shown in Table 2.16 indicates that among Cupertino’s senior households, renters were more likely to be lower income than homeowners. Nearly 62 percent of senior renter- households earned less than 80 percent of the median family income compared to only 42 percent of senior homeowners. Seniors across the country are often required to dedicate a larger portion of their income to housing costs. Among all of the renter-households in Cupertino, the proportion of seniors overpaying for housing in 2010 was more than double the proportion for the general population: 63 percent versus 30 percent, respectively (see Table 2.16). For homeowners, however, the proportion of senior owner-households overpaying for housing was much more on par with the general population (29 percent versus 34 percent, respectively). During the community outreach process for developing the Housing Element, the need for senior housing options in Cupertino was highlighted by many residents. RESOURCES AVAILABLE Cupertino offers a number of resources for seniors. As shown in Table 2.22, there are five residential care facilities for the elderly and three skilled nursing facilities in the city. Residential care facilities for the elderly (RCFEs), also known as “assisted living” or “board and care” facilities, provide assistance with some activities of daily living while still allowing residents to be more independent than in most nursing homes. Skilled nursing facilities—also known as nursing homes—offer a higher level of care, with registered nurses on staff 24 hours a day. In addition to assisted living facilities, there are two subsidized independent senior housing developments in the city. As shown in Table 2.22, there are a total of 100 units of affordable senior housing in Cupertino. Furthermore in 2011, the City utilized CDBG funds to rehabilitate a home that provides accommodation APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.20: Special Needs Groups, 2010-2013 Special Needs Group Persons or Household Renter Owner Percent of Total Senior-Headed Households 3,983 785 (19.7%)3,198 (80.3%)19.7% Households with a Senior Member 5,069 n/a n/a 25.1% Seniors Living Alone 1,612 516 (32.0%)1,096 (68.0%)8.0% Large Households 1,883 619 (32.9%)1,264 (67.1%)9.3% Single-Parent Households 883 n/a n/a 4.4% Female Single-Parent Households 667 n/a n/a 6.9% Persons with Disabilities (a)3,445 n/a n/a 5.9% Agricultural Workers (b)36 n/a n/a <1% Persons living in Poverty (b)2,330 n/a n/a 4.0% Homeless (c)112 n/a n/a <1% Notes: (a) 2010 Census data not available for persons with disabilities. Estimate is from the 2008-2012 ACS. Estimate is for persons 5 years of age and older. (b) 2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from the 2007-2011 ACS.| (c) 2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Point-In-Time Census and Survey Comprehensive Report. Of the 112 homeless persons counted in Cupertino in 2013, 92 persons were unsheltered and 20 were sheltered. Sources: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013; U.S. Census, American Community Survey (ACS), 2008-2012; 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Point-In-Time Census and Survey Comprehensive Report. B-43 to five low-income seniors. Demand for these subsidized units is high. Staff at Sunny View estimate that over 700 people are on the waiting list, and the turnover rate for available units is about 10 to 15 per year. The Cupertino Senior Center also serves as an excellent resource for seniors. The many different services at the center help seniors to obtain resources in the community that will assist them to continue to remain independent and safe in their own homes. Available programs include various social and recreation activities, special events, travel programs, transportation discounts, drop-in consultation, case management, medical, and social services. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-44 Additionally, the Senior Adult Day Care (Cupertino Center) provides frail, dependent, low-income Cupertino seniors with specialized programs of recreation, mental stimulation, exercise, companionship and nutritious meals during the day. This facility is operated by Live Oak Adult Day Care a local non- profit organization. In addition, the City supports a number of programs with Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), General Fund Human Service Grants (HSG) and Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF) funds that provide services specifically for seniors in the community. The Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program, operated by Catholic Charities, provides advocacy for Cupertino seniors in long-term care facilities to ensure they have a voice in their own care and treatment. The program receives, investigates and resolves any complaints associated with the care of long-term care facility residents. A legal assistance program for seniors is provided by Senior Adults Legal Assistance (SALA) which provides free legal services to low- and very low-income seniors at the Cupertino Senior Center. Legal services provided are in the area of consumer complaints, housing, elder abuse, and simple wills. The Live Oak Adult Day Care receives partial financial assistance to help operate the Senior Adult Day Care (Cupertino Center). LARGE HOUSEHOLDS Large households are defined as those with five or more members. Large households are identified as a special needs group because of limited opportunities for adequately sized and affordable housing. Cupertino has a smaller proportion of large households than Santa Clara County as a whole. As shown in Table 2.23, 9.3 percent of all households in Cupertino were comprised of five or more persons in 2010. In Santa Clara County, about 14.8 percent of households were considered large. Large households were more likely to be homeowners (1,264 households, 67 percent) than renters (619 households, 33 percent). While Cupertino has a smaller proportion of large households than Santa Clara County, its housing stock is comprised of a larger proportion of homes with three or more bedrooms. As shown in Table 2.24, about 64 percent of the housing units in Cupertino had three or more bedrooms while only 59 percent of Santa Clara County homes had three or more bedrooms. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.22: Housing Resources for the Elderly Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Location Capacity The Forum at Rancho San Antonio 23500 Cristo Rey Drive 741 Paradise Manor 4 19161 Muriel Lane 6 Pleasant Manor of Cupertino 10718 Nathanson Avenue 6 Purglen of Cupertino 10366 Miller Avenue 12 Sunny View Manor (a)22445 Cupertino Road 190 Total 955 Skilled Nursing Facilities Health Care Center at Forum at Rancho San Antonio 23600 Via Esplendor 48 Cupertino Healthcare & Wellness Center 22590 Voss Avenue 170 Sunny View Manor 22445 Cupertino Road 48 Total 266 Subsidized Independent Senior Rental Housing Sunny View West 22449 Cupertino Road 99 Senior Housing Solutions 19935 Price Avenue 1 Total 100 Adult Day Care Live Oak Adult Day Services 20920 McClellan Road 30 Cupertino Senior Center 21251 Stevens Creek N/A Notes: (a) Sunny View Manor has 115 units for independent and assisted (RCFE) living. All 115 units are licensed as RCFE units, but residents may choose between independent and assisted living options. The distribution of independent and assisted living units varies over time. Sources: California Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing Division Facility Search Form, 2014; California Department of Public Health, Health Facilities Search, 2014.B-45 Table 2.21: Elderly Households by Tenure and Age, 2010 Cupertino Santa Clara County Number Percent Number Percent Under 64 Years Old Owner 9,429 58.2%265,727 54.0% Renter 6,769 41.8%226,517 46.0% Total 16,198 100.0%492,244 100.0% 65 Plus Years Old Owner 3,198 80.3%82,571 73.8% Renter 785 19.7%29,389 26.2% Total 3,983 100.0%111,960 100.0% Total Households 20,181 604,204 Percent Householders 65 Plus Years 19.7%18.5% Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.23: Household Size by Tenure, 2010 Owner Renter Total Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Cupertino 1- 4 Persons 11,363 90.0%6,935 91.8%18,298 90.7% 5+ Persons 1,264 10.0%619 8.2%1,883 9.3% Total 12,627 100.0%7,554 100.0%20,181 100.0% Santa Clara County 1- 4 Persons 297,385 85.4%217,578 85.0%514,963 85.2% 5+ Persons 50,913 14.6%38,328 15.0%89,241 14.8% Total 348,298 100.0%255,906 100.0%604,204 100.0% Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. RESOURCES AVAILABLE Large households in Cupertino can benefit from the general housing programs and services offered by the City, such as the BMR Program and housing rehabilitation programs. Other programs include Mortgage Credit Certificates and Housing Choice Vouchers administered by the County, and homebuyer assistance offered by the Housing Trust Silicon Valley. SINGLE-PARENT HOUSEHOLDS Single-parent households often require special consideration and assistance because of their greater need for affordable housing and accessible day-care, health care, and other supportive services. Female-headed single-parent households with children, in particular, tend to have a higher need for affordable housing than other family households in general. In addition, these households are more likely to need childcare since the mother is often the sole source of income and the sole caregiver for the children in the household. In 2010, there were 667 female-headed single-parent households with children under 18 years of age in Cupertino, representing 3.3 percent of all households in the City (Table 2.25). A significant proportion of these households were living in poverty in 2011 (21 percent). The U.S. Census Bureau sets poverty level thresholds each year and they are often used to establish eligibility for federal services. B-46 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.24: Existing Housing Stock by Number of Bedrooms, 2011 Owner Households Renter Households Total Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Cupertino No Bedroom 0 0.0%208 2.9%208 1.0% 1 Bedroom 468 3.6%1,554 21.5%2,022 10.0% 2 Bedrooms 1,530 11.8%3,491 48.4%5,021 24.9% 3 Bedrooms 4,782 36.9%1,609 22.3%6,391 31.7% 4 Bedrooms 4,785 36.9%314 4.4%5,099 25.3% 5 or More Bedrooms 1,396 10.8%39 0.5%1,435 7.1% Total 12,961 100.0%7,215 100.0%20,176 100.0% Santa Clara County No Bedroom 1,091 0.3%16,371 6.6%17,462 2.9% 1 Bedroom 7,477 2.1%74,195 29.9%81,672 13.6% 2 Bedrooms 54,461 15.5%94,453 38.1%148,914 24.8% 3 Bedrooms 147,933 42.0%45,456 18.3%193,389 32.3% 4 Bedrooms 109,892 31.2%13,875 5.6%123,767 20.6% 5 or More Bedrooms 31,043 8.8%3,405 1.4%34,448 5.7% Total 351,897 100.0%247,755 100.0%599,652 100.0% Source: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), Housing Element Data Profiles, December 2013. B-47 The number of female-headed single-parent households declined slightly from 2000, but these households continue to make up the same proportion of all households in the City. Compared to Santa Clara County, the City’s proportion of female-headed single-parent households was lower (five percent versus three percent, respectively). RESOURCES AVAILABLE Single-parent households in Cupertino can benefit from City programs and services that provide assistance to lower income households in general, such as the BMR, CDBG and HSG Programs. Single-parent households can also benefit from supportive and childcare services available to County residents through various organizations, including Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County, Choices for Children, Grail Family Services, InnVision Shelter Network, Second Harvest Food Bank, and West Valley Community Services, among others. 3 3 David Rosen. “Inclusionary Housing and Its Impact on Housing and Land Markets.” NHC Affordable Housing Policy Review 1(3). 2004. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES A disability is a physical or mental impairment that limits one or more major life activities. Persons with a disability generally have lower incomes and often face barriers to finding employment or adequate housing due to physical or structural obstacles. This segment of the population often needs affordable housing that is located near public transportation, services, and shopping. Persons with disabilities may require units equipped with wheelchair accessibility or other special features that accommodate physical or sensory limitations. Depending on the severity of the disability, people may live independently with some assistance in their own homes, or may require assisted living and supportive services in special care facilities. Table 2.25: Family Characteristics, Cupertino, 2010 Household Type Number Percent of Total 1-Person Household 3,544 17.6% Male Householder 1,472 7.3% Female Householder 2,072 10.3% 2 or More Person Household 16,637 82.4% Family Households:15,776 78.2% Married-Couple Family 13,802 68.4% With Own Children Under 18 Years 8,392 41.6% Other Family;1,974 9.8% Male Householder, no Wife Present 581 2.9% With Own Children Under 18 Years 216 1.1% Female Householder, no Wife Present 1,393 6.9% With Own Children Under 18 Years 667 3.3% Nonfamily Households:4,405 21.8% Male Householder 1,472 7.3% Female Householder 2,072 10.3% Total Households 20,181 100.0% Source: U.S. Census, 2010. B-48 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) According to the 2008-2012 ACS, about six percent of Cupertino residents and eight percent of Santa Clara County residents had one or more disabilities (Table 2.27). Hearing, ambulatory, and independent living difficulties were the most common disabilities among seniors, while cognitive difficulties were more common among persons aged 18 to 64 with disabilities. Overall, ambulatory difficulties were the most prevalent (45.2 percent). Table 2.28 shows that among persons with disabilities aged 18 to 64, the majority (55.8 percent) in both the City and County were not in the labor force. About one-third of both City and County residents (aged 18 to 64) with disabilities were employed. PERSONS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES A recent change in State law requires that the Housing Element discuss the housing needs of persons with developmental disabilities. As defined by the Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, “developmental disability” means “a disability that originates before an individual attains age 18 years, continues, or can be expected to continue, indefinitely, and constitutes a substantial disability for that individual. As defined by the Director of Developmental Services, in consultation with the Superintendent of Public Instruction, this term shall include mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and autism. This term shall also include disabling conditions found to be closely related to mental retardation or to require treatment similar to that required for individuals with mental retardation, but shall not include other handicapping conditions that are solely physical in nature. This definition also reflects the individual’s need for a combination and sequence of special, interdisciplinary, or generic services, individualized supports, or other forms of assistance that are of lifelong or extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated. The Census does not record developmental disabilities. However, according to the U.S. Administration on Developmental Disabilities, an accepted estimate of the percentage of the population that can be defined as developmentally B-49 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.26: Poverty Status, Cupertino, 2011 Families Below Poverty Line Number Percent Married-Couple Family 237 57.5% With Own Children Under 18 Years 115 27.9% Other Family Male Householder 26 6.3% With Own Children Under 18 Years 7 1.7% Female Householder 149 36.2% With Own Children Under 18 Years 87 21.1% Total Families Below Poverty Line 412 100.0% Source: U.S. Census, American Community Survey (ACS), 2007, 2011 disabled is 1.5 percent. This equates to approximately 875 persons with developmental disabilities residing in the City of Cupertino, based on the 2010 Census population. According to the State’s Department of Developmental Services, as of September 2013, approximately 303 Cupertino residents with developmental disabilities were being assisted at the San Andreas Regional Center. Most of these individuals were residing in a private home with their parent or guardian, and 196 of these persons with developmental disabilities were under the age of 18. Many developmentally disabled persons can live and work independently within a conventional housing environment. More severely disabled individuals require a group living environment where supervision is provided. The most severely affected individuals may require an institutional environment where medical attention and physical therapy are provided. Because developmental disabilities exist before adulthood, the first issue in supportive housing for the developmentally disabled is the transition from the person’s living situation as a child to an appropriate level of independence as an adult. B-50 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 2.27: Persons with Disabilities by Disability Type, 2012 Disability Type % of Disabilities Tallied Age 5 to 17 Age 18 to 64 Age 65+Total Cupertino With a hearing difficulty 17.8%21.6%55.3%40.8% With a vision difficulty 5.3%16.4%10.9%12.7% With a cognitive difficulty 36.2%40.3%21.9%29.5% With an ambulatory difficulty 30.3%32.1%55.0%45.2% With a self-care difficulty 57.9%19.6%20.0%21.5% With an independent living difficulty -- 32.0%46.0%38.6% Total Persons with Disabilities (a)152 1,313 1,980 3,445 % of Total Population 6% Santa Clara County With a hearing difficulty 11.8%20.1%41.4%29.8% With a vision difficulty 14.6%16.4%17.4%16.7% With a cognitive difficulty 69.4%41.7%28.0%36.9% With an ambulatory difficulty 17.5%42.3%61.9%50.1% With a self-care difficulty 28.5%17.2%26.9%22.6% With an independent living difficulty -- 36.8%51.4%41.5% Total Persons with Disabilities (a)8,691 62,221 65,554 136,466 % of Total Population 8% Note: (a) Total does not include population under 5 years of age. Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey (ACS), 2008-2012. Table 2.28: Persons Age 18 to 64 with Disabilities by Employment Status, 2012 Cupertino Santa Clara County Persons With a Disability Number Percent of Total Population Number Percent of Total Population Total Population Age 18-64 (a)1,313 100.0%62,221 100.0% Employed 480 36.6%22,566 36.3% Unemployed 101 7.7%4,932 7.9% Not in Labor Force 732 55.8%34,723 55.8% Note: (a) Total does not include population under 18 years of age or over 65 years. Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey (ACS), 2008-2012. B-51 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RESOURCES AVAILABLE Table 2.29 summarizes the licensed community care facilities in Cupertino that serve special needs groups. Adult residential facilities offer 24-hour non-medical care for adults, ages 18 to 59 years old, who are unable to provide for their daily needs due to physical or mental disabilities. Group homes, small residential facilities that serve children or adults with chronic disabilities, also provide 24- hour care by trained professionals. In addition, a 27-unit multi-family residential property (Le Beaulieu) offers affordable housing to very low-income persons with disabilities. FARMWORKERS Farmworkers are traditionally defined as persons whose primary incomes are earned through agricultural labor. They have special housing needs because of their relatively low income and also because of the often transient and seasonal nature of their jobs. The 2011 ACS reported that 36 Cupertino residents were employed in the agriculture, farming, fishing and forestry occupations, making up less than 0.1 percent of the City’s population. RESOURCES AVAILABLE To the extent that farmworkers may want to live in Cupertino, their need for affordable housing would be similar to that of other lower income persons, and their housing needs can be addressed through general affordable housing programs for lower-income households, such as BMR, CDBG and HSG programs. Table 2.29: Community Care Facilities in Cupertino, 2014 Adult Residential Facilities Location Capacity Paradise Manor 2 19133 Muriel Lane 6 Paradise Manor 3 19147 Muriel Lane 6 Total 12 Group Homes Pace-Morehouse 7576 Kirwin Lane 6 Pacific Autism Center for Education Miracle House 19681 Drake Drive 6 Total 12 Source: California Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing Division Facility Search Form, 2014 B-52 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RESIDENTS LIVING BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL Families with incomes below the poverty level, specifically those with extremely low and very low incomes, are at the greatest risk of becoming homeless and often require assistance in meeting their rent and mortgage obligations in order to prevent homelessness. The 2007-2011 ACS found that four percent of all Cupertino residents were living below the poverty level. Specifically, about three percent of family households and two percent of families with children were living below the poverty level. These households may require specific housing solutions such as deeper income targeting for subsidies, housing with supportive services, single-room occupancy units, or rent subsidies and vouchers. RESOURCES AVAILABLE Persons living with incomes below the poverty level can benefit from City programs and services that provide assistance to lower-income households in general, such as BMR, CDBG and HSG programs. Households with incomes below the poverty level can also benefit from supportive services available to County residents through various organizations, including Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County, Choices for Children, InnVision Shelter Network, Second Harvest Food Bank, and West Valley Community Services, among others. HOMELESS Demand for emergency and transitional shelter in Cupertino is difficult to determine given the episodic nature of homelessness. Generally, episodes of homelessness among families or individuals can occur as a single event or periodically. The 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Census & Survey reported a point-in-time count of 7,631 homeless people on the streets and in emergency shelters, transitional housing, and domestic violence shelters. This estimate includes 112 homeless individuals in the City of Cupertino. The count, however, should be considered conservative because many unsheltered homeless individuals may not be visible at street locations, even with the most thorough methodology. There is no data presently available documenting the increased level of demand for shelter in Santa Clara County or Cupertino during particular times of the year. Due to the relatively mild climate, the only time of year when increased demand appears to be a factor is during the winter months (November to March). The annual homeless count always takes place in the last week of January, a period when demand for shelter typically is at its highest. Since the year-round need B-53 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) described above is based on the annual count, the need for emergency shelter either year-round or seasonally is not likely to be greater than that found during the annual homeless count. RESOURCES AVAILABLE Table 2.31 lists facilities within Santa Clara County that serve the needs of homeless. Emergency shelters provide temporary shelter for individuals and families while transitional shelters serve families making a transition from homelessness to permanent housing. In Cupertino, West Valley Community Services (WVCS) offers supportive services and the Transitional Housing Program (THP) through its Haven to Home Program. The Haven to Home Program helps homeless individuals and families work towards stability by providing access to resources such as food, transportation, toiletries and other such items. The program has the capacity to provide housing for 12 single men and six single mothers with one child under the age of six. Residents of THP sign a six-month lease, which may be renewed depending on the resident’s case plan and progress. For supportive services, a case manager is available to provide intensive case management for up to 21 homeless households at a time. The THP typically has a waiting list of 10 to 30 households, while the waiting list for Table 2.30: Santa Clara County Homeless Census and Survey, 2013 (a) Jurisdiction Individuals % Total Cupertino Unsheltered (b)92 82.1% Sheltered (c)20 17.9% Total 112 100.0% Santa Clara County Unsheltered (b)5,674 74.4% Sheltered (c)1,957 25.6% Total 7,631 100.0% Notes: (a) This Homeless Census and Survey was conducted over a two day period from January 29 to January 30, 2013 This survey, per HUD new requirements, does not include people in rehabilitation facilities, hospitals or jails due to more narrow HUD definition of point-in-time homelessness. (b) Individuals found living on the streets, in parks, encampments, vehicles, or other places not meant for humanhabitation. (c) Individuals who are living in emergency shelters or transitional housing programs. Source: 2013 Santa ClaraCounty Homeless Point-In-Time Census & Survey, Comprehensive Report. B-54 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) supportive services generally has five to 20 households. Given the increase in requests for emergency shelter over the past few years, WVCS staff believes that there is a need for additional emergency shelter services in Cupertino. This need is particularly high for families with children. Additionally, Faith in Action Silicon Valley Rotating Shelter operates a rotating shelter program which accommodates up to 15 homeless men. The shelter rotates locations, which include various Cupertino congregation and community partner locations. Additional services offered by the program include case management, meals, shower facilities, bus passes, job development and counseling, and other supportive services. 2.8. NEEDS ASSESSMENT SUMMARY • Cupertino grew faster than Santa Clara County and the Bay Area between 2000 and 2010. The local population increased by 15 percent from 50,600 people to 58,300. However, some of this growth was due to the annexation of 168 acres of unincorporated land in Santa Clara County between 2000 and 2008. • ABAG projects Cupertino will grow to 71,200 residents by 2040. Cupertino and Santa Clara County are anticipated to experience the same rate of population increase (nearly 21 percent) between 2010 and 2040; the Bay Area’s population is expected to increase by 28 percent during the same time. • Cupertino has an aging population. The median age in Cupertino rose from 37.9 years old in 2000 to 39.9 years old in 2010. The percent of elderly residents, aged 65 years old and older, increased from 11 percent to 13 percent. • The City has a high percentage of family households; in 2010, family households comprised 77 percent of all households in Cupertino, compared with 71 percent of Santa Clara County households and 65 percent of Bay Area households. • Large households comprised 9.3 percent of the City’s total households, the majority of which were owner-households. Overall, the proportion of large B-55 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-56 Table 2.31: Homeless Facilities in Santa Clara County, 2014 Organization Facility Address Total Capacity Transitional Housing EHC LifeBuilders Transitional (Families With Children) Boccardo Family Living Center 13545 Monterey Road San Martin, CA 95046 26 Units EHC LifeBuilders Transitional (Veterans)Boccardo Regional Reception Center 2011 Little Orchard St. San Jose, CA 95125 20 Beds EHC LifeBuilders Transitional (Youth)Sobrato House Youth Center 496 S. Third Street San Jose, CA 95112 9 Units Family Supportive Housing Transitional (Families)Scattered Sites in Santa Clara County Not available InnVision Transitional Montgomery Street Inn 358 N. Montgomery Street San Jose, CA 95110 85 Persons InnVision Transitional (Women and Children) Villa 184 South 11th Street San Jose, CA 95112 55 Persons Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence Transitional (Victims of Domestic Violence - Women and Children) The HomeSafes in San Jose and Santa Clara (a)48 Units West Valley Community Services Transitional (Men and Single Mothers) 10311-10321 Greenwood Ct. Cupertino, CA 95014 12 Single Men and 6 Single Mothers Maitri Transitional (Women and Children)N/A (address is confidential)9 Beds Note: (a) Location is confidential. Source: 211 Santa Clara County, 2014. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-57 Table 2.31: Homeless Facilities in Santa Clara County, 2014 (CONTINUED) Organization Facility Address Total Capacity Emergency Shelters Asian Americans For Community Involvement of Santa Clara County, Inc. Emergency (Victims of Domestic Violence - Women and Children) Asian Women's Home 2400 Moorpark Avenue, Suite 300 San Jose, 95128 12 persons EHC LifeBuilders Emergency Boccardo Reception Center (BRC) 2011 Little Orchard San Jose, 95125 200 Persons (Year Round) 250 Persons (December 2 to March 31) EHC LifeBuilders Emergency Sunnyvale National Guard Armory 620 E. Maude Sunnyvale, 94086 125 Persons EHC LifeBuilders Emergency (Veterans) Boccardo Reception Center (BRC) 2011 Little Orchard San Jose, 95125 40 Persons (December 2 to March 31) EHC LifeBuilders Emergency (Youth) Sobrato House Youth Center 496 S. Third Street San Jose, CA 95112 10 beds Family Supportive Housing Emergency (Families) San Jose Family Shelter 692 North King Road San Jose, CA, 95133-1667 35 Families Faith In Action Silicon Valley Rotating Shelter Emergency Faith In Action Silicon Valley Rotating Shelter 1669-2 Hollenbeck Ave. #220 Sunnyvale, CA 94087 15 Persons InnVision Emergency Julian Street Inn 546 West Julian Street San Jose, CA, 95110 70 Beds InnVision Emergency (Women and Children) 260 Commercial Street San Jose, CA, 95112 55 Persons Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence Emergency (Victims of Domestic Violence - Women and Children) The Shelter Next DoorSanta Clara County (a)20 Persons APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) households in the City was lower than countywide average. • Approximately 3.3 percent of all households in the City were single-parent households, with 21 percent living below the poverty level. However, the proportion of single-parent households in the City has declined since 2000. • About six percent of the City’s population aged five and above had one or more disabilities, lower than the countywide average of eight percent. According to the State Department of Developmental Services, 303 residents were being assisted at the San Andreas Regional Center. • Cupertino, along with Santa Clara County, is becoming an increasingly jobs- rich city. ABAG projects the number of jobs in Cupertino will increase by 25 percent between 2010 and 2040, resulting in a jobs-to-household ratio of 1.38 by 2040, up from the ratio of 1.29 in 2010. • The local housing stock is dominated by single-family detached homes; 57 percent of homes were single-family detached dwellings in 2013. Although the number of multi-family housing units experienced the most rapid growth between 2000 and 2013, Cupertino still has a smaller proportion of multi-family housing units than Santa Clara County (28 percent in the city versus 32 percent in the County overall). One affordable housing project – Beardon Drive (eight units) – is considered at risk of converting to market- rate housing during the next ten years. • Housing costs continue to rise in Cupertino. Median home sales prices rose by approximately 29 percent between 2011 and 2013, after plateauing between 2008 and 2010 during the depth of the housing market crisis. Homeownership in Cupertino is generally out of reach for most except the highest-earning households. • Affordable rental housing is equally difficult to obtain. The current median market rent rate of $3,500 for a three-bedroom unit exceeds the maximum affordable monthly rent for lower- and moderate-income households. • In 2010, 30 percent of renters and 37 percent of homeowners were overpaying for housing in Cupertino. • In 2010, 63 percent of elderly renter-households were overpaying for housing, the highest rate among any household type regardless of tenure. • The 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Survey reported a point-in-time count of 7,631 homeless people on the streets and in emergency shelters, transitional housing, and domestic violence shelters, including 112 individuals in the City of Cupertino. B-58 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) 3. REGIONAL HOUSING NEEDS DETERMINATION 2014-2022 This section discusses the projected housing needs for the current planning period, which runs from January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022. 3.1. REGIONAL HOUSING NEEDS ALLOCATION (RHNA) Pursuant to California Government Code Section 65584, the state, regional councils of government (in this case, ABAG), and local governments must collectively determine each locality’s share of regional housing need. In conjunction with the state-mandated housing element update cycle that requires Bay Area jurisdictions to update their elements by January 31, 2015, ABAG has allocated housing unit production needs for each jurisdiction within the Bay Area. These allocations set housing production goals for the planning period that runs from January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022. The following summarizes ABAG’s housing need allocation for Cupertino, along with housing production data for the 2014-2022 time period. The City of Cupertino may count housing units constructed, approved, or proposed since January 1, 2014 toward satisfying its RHNA goals for this planning period. Table 3.1 presents a summary of ABAG’s housing needs allocation for Cupertino for 2014 to 2022. 3.2 HOUSING NEEDS FOR EXTREMELY LOW-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS State law requires housing elements to quantify and analyze the existing and projected housing needs of extremely low-income households. HUD defines an extremely low-income household as one earning less than 30 percent of AMI. These households encounter a unique set of housing situations and needs, and may often include special needs populations or represent families and individuals receiving public assistance, such as social security insurance (SSI) or disability insurance. As discussed in the Needs Assessment section, approximately eight percent of all Cupertino households earned less than 30 percent of AMI in 2010. Extremely low-income households represented 12 percent of all renter-households and five percent of all owner-households. B-59 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-60 To estimate the projected housing need for extremely low income households, state law allows either assuming 50 percent of the very low-income households as extremely low income, or to apportion the very low-income households based on Census-documented distribution. Using the allowable even split, 50 percent of Cupertino’s 356 very low-income RHNA units are assumed to serve extremely low-income households. Based on this methodology, the city has a projected need of 178 units for extremely low-income households. Extremely low-income households often rely on supportive or subsidized housing as a means of transitioning into stable, more productive lives. Supportive housing combines housing with supportive services such as job training, life skills training, substance abuse programs, and case management services. Subsidized housing can include programs such as the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program or tenant-based rental assistance (TBRA) which ensures that the tenant does not pay more than 30 percent of their gross income on housing by paying a portion of the tenants rent. Efficiency studios and BMR rental units can also provide affordable housing opportunities for extremely low-income households. 4. HOUSING CONSTRAINTS Section 65583(a)(4) of the California Government Code states that the housing element must analyze “potential and actual governmental constraints upon Table 3.1: RHNA, Cupertino, 2014-2022 Income Category Projected Need Percent of Total Extremely Low/Very Low (0-50% of AMI)356 33.5% Low (51-80% of AMI)207 19.5% Moderate (81-120% of AMI)231 21.7% Above Moderate (over 120% AMI)270 25.4% Total Units ,064 100.0% Source: ABAG Regional Housing Needs Assessment, 2014. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-61 the maintenance, improvement, or development of housing for all income levels, including land use controls, building codes and their enforcement, site improvements, fees and other exactions required of developers, and local processing and permit procedures.” In addition to government constraints, this section assesses other factors that may constrain the production of affordable housing in Cupertino. These include infrastructure availability, environmental features, economic and financing constraints, market conditions and community acceptance of different housing types and densities. Recent court rulings have removed some of the mechanisms local government traditionally has used to require developers to provide affordable housing, thus exacerbating the difficulty of meeting the number of units determined necessary by the regional housing needs assessment. 4.1. GOVERNMENT CONSTRAINTS Government regulations can affect housing costs by limiting the supply of buildable land, setting standards and allowable densities for development, and exacting fees for the use of land or the construction of homes. The increased costs associated with such requirements are often passed on to consumers in the form of higher home prices and rents. Potential regulatory constraints include local land use policies (as defined in a community’s general plan), zoning regulations and their accompanying development standards, subdivision regulations, growth control ordinances or urban limit lines, and development impact and building permit fees. Lengthy approval and processing times also may be regulatory constraints. GENERAL PLAN The General Plan provides the policy and program direction necessary to guide land use decisions in the first two decades of the 21st century. The existing General Plan is current and legally adequate and is not considered an impediment to housing production. As required by state law, the General Plan includes a land use map indicating the allowable uses and densities at various locations in the city. The Land Use/ Community Design section identifies five categories of residential uses based on dwelling unit density, expressed as the number of dwelling units permitted per gross acre. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) • The “Very Low Density” classification, intended to protect environmentally sensitive areas from extensive development and to protect human life from hazards associated with floods, fires, and unstable terrain, applies one of four slope-density formulas to determine allowable residential density. • The “Low Density” and “Low/Medium Density” categories promote traditional single-family development, allowing densities of one to five units per gross acre, and five to 10 units per gross acre, respectively. • The “Medium/High Density” and the “High Density” categories provide for a wide range of multi-family housing opportunities at densities of 10 to 20 units per gross acre and 20 to 35 units per gross acre, respectively. In addition to the five residential categories, the General Plan allows for residential uses in the “Industrial/Residential,” “Office/Commercial/Residential,” “Commercial/Residential” and “Neighborhood Commercial/Residential” land use categories. None of the City’s General Plan policies have been identified as housing constraints. The General Plan does not define whether residential units are to be rented or owned or whether they are to be attached or detached. The General Plan’s land use policies incorporate housing goals, including the following: POLICY LU-1.1: LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION Focus higher land use intensities and densities within a half-mile of public transit service, and along major corridors. POLICY LU-1.3: LAND USE IN ALL CITYWIDE MIXED-USE DISTRICTS Encourage land uses that support the activity and character of mixed-use districts and economic goals. POLICY LU-5.2: MIXED-USE VILLAGES Where housing is allowed along major corridors or neighborhood commercial areas, development should promote mixed-use villages with active ground- floor uses and public space. The development should help create an inviting pedestrian environment and activity center that can serve adjoining neighborhoods and businesses. POLICY LU-8.3: INCENTIVES FOR REINVESTMENT Provide incentives for reinvestment in existing, older commercial areas. B-62 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-63 POLICY LU-13.3: PARCEL ASSEMBLY Heart of the City Special Area: Encourage the assembly of parcels to foster new development projects that can provide high-quality development with adequate buffers for neighborhoods. POLICY LU-19.1: VALLCO SHOPPING DISTRICT SPECIFIC PLAN Create a Vallco Shopping District Specific Plan prior to any development on the site that lays out the land uses, design standards and guidelines, and infrastructure improvements required. The General Plan contains very few policies addressing the siting of housing, other than those pertaining to hillside and other sensitive areas. Land use policies limit development in hillside areas to protect hillside resources but allows for low-intensity residential development in the foothills. The General Plan also encourages the clustering of new development away from sensitive areas such as riparian corridors, wildlife habitat and corridors, public open space preserves and ridgelines. Thus, even in hillside and sensitive areas, the General Plan creates opportunities for housing production. ZONING ORDINANCE The Cupertino Zoning Ordinance establishes development standards and densities for new housing in the City. These regulations include minimum lot sizes, maximum number of dwelling units per acre, lot width, setbacks, lot coverage, maximum building height, and minimum parking requirements. These standards are summarized in Table 4.1. As required by state law, the Zoning Map is consistent with the General Plan. The residential zoning districts and their respective permitted densities and development standards are summarized below. Residential development is permitted by right in residential zones. R-1 SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL The R-1 District is intended to create, preserve, and enhance areas suitable for detached single-family dwellings. The R-1 District includes sub-areas with varying minimum lot size requirements. Residential structures in the R-1 District APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) are limited in size by a maximum lot coverage of 45 percent and a maximum floor area ratio of 45 percent. Setbacks are 20 feet in the front and rear yards and a combined 15 feet of side yards, with no one side yard setback less than 5 feet. The maximum building height of 28 feet allows for a wide range of single family housing types on flat terrain. Structures in R-1 Districts with an “i” designation at the end are limited to one story (18 feet). Two-story structures in the R-1 District require a Two-Story Residential Permit. The Director of Community Development may approve, conditionally approve, or deny applications for a two-story residential permit. Projects must be “harmonious in scale and design with the general neighborhood.” R-2 RESIDENTIAL DUPLEX The R-2 District is intended to allow a second dwelling unit under the same ownership as the initial dwelling unit on a site. The residential duplex district is intended to increase the variety of housing opportunities within the community while maintaining the existing neighborhood character. Minimum lot area is 8,500 square feet; building heights in this district cannot exceed 30 feet. The R-2 District limits lot coverage by all buildings to 40 percent of net lot area. Setbacks are 20 feet in the front yard and the greater of 20 feet and 20 percent of lot depth in the rear yard; the minimum side yard setback is 20 percent of the lot width. Structures in R-2 Districts with an “i” designation at the end are limited to one story (18 feet). The development standards for the R-2 District do not constrain the development of duplexes. The 30-foot height limit is appropriate because many R-2 zoned areas abut single-family residential development. Furthermore, 30 feet in height is sufficient for duplex development. The 40 percent maximum lot coverage has also not constrained the development of duplexes in Cupertino. None of the residential opportunity sites included in this Housing Element fall within the R-2 zone. R-3 MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL The R-3 District permits multi-family residential development. This District requires a minimum lot area of 9,300 square feet for a development with three dwelling units and an additional 2,000 square feet for every additional dwelling B-64 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-65 unit. The minimum lot width in the R-3 District is 70 feet, and lot coverage may not exceed 40 percent of net lot area. For single-story structures, required setbacks are 20 feet in the front yard, six feet in the side yard, and the greater of 20 feet or 20 percent of lot depth in the rear yard; the minimum side yard setback for two-story structures is nine feet. The maximum height any building is two stories and may not exceed 30 feet. This height limit is used because many R-3 districts abut single-family residential neighborhoods. Basements (fully submerged below grade except for lightwells required for light, ventilation and emergency egress, which may have a maximum exterior wall height of two feet between natural grade and ceiling) are permitted and are not counted towards the height requirements. For these reasons, the height standards in the R-3 district are not considered a constraint to housing production. Furthermore, the development standards for the R-3 District are on par with standards present in neighboring jurisdictions. The development standards for the R-3 District do not unreasonably constrain the development of multi-family housing. Multi-family residential uses are permitted uses in the R-3 District without the need for a Use Permit. Developments are able to achieve close to the maximum allowable densities under existing development standards, including the height limit and maximum lot coverage. This can be demonstrated by a back-of-the-envelope calculation of the number of developable units on a one-acre parcel. As shown in Table 4.2, the maximum density allowed on a one-acre parcel is 20 units. With a maximum lot coverage of 40 percent and assuming two stories of residential development, approximately 35,000 square feet of residential development can be achieved. Using conservative assumptions of 20 percent common area space and large unit sizes of 1,400 square feet, 20 units can be developed under this scenario. This analysis demonstrates that projects would be able to achieve the maximum allowable density in the R-3 District under the development standards. This Housing Element includes a strategy to monitor the development standards to facilitate a range of housing options (Strategy HE-1.3.1 - See General Plan Chapter 4: Housing Element). APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) RHS RESIDENTIAL HILLSIDE The RHS District regulates development in the hillsides to balance residential uses with the need to preserve the natural setting and protect life and property from natural hazards. Dwelling unit density is determined by the slope-density standards outlined in the General Plan. Minimum lot size ranges from 20,000 square feet to 400,000 square feet. The minimum lot width in the RHS District is 70 feet, with an exception for lots served by a private driveway and which do not adjoin a public street. Development applications in the RHS District must include topographical information, including whether the proposed structure is on or in the site line of a prominent ridgeline. The City has established a process to allow for exceptions to development requirements in the RHS zone if certain stated findings can be made. R-1C RESIDENTIAL SINGLE FAMILY CLUSTER The purpose of the R-1C District is to provide a means for reducing the amount of street improvements and public utilities required in residential development, to conserve natural resources, and encourage more creative development and efficient use of space. The owner of a property within Cupertino may submit an application for single-family residential cluster zoning or rezoning to the Planning Commission. Alternatively, the Planning Commission and/or the City Council may initiate a public hearing to rezone specific properties to the R-1C District. The allowable density on a parcel is determined by the existing land use designations in place prior to the rezoning. Density ranges are determined based on the relationship with and impacts to surrounding neighborhoods, streets, infrastructure and natural areas as well as the quality of design and relationship to adopted Housing Element goals. While the maximum height in the district is 30 feet, a height increase may be permitted if the City Council or Planning Commission determines that it would not have an adverse impact on the immediately adjacent neighborhood. The R-1C District also regulates site design and private streets within the cluster. Development requirements for proposed R-1C developments can be waived or modified, if the Planning Commission and City Council find that the site is constrained but substantially meets the zoning standards or if the proposal provides for low-moderate income and senior citizen housing. B-66 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-67 Table 4.1: Summary of City Zoning Standards Minimum Yard Setback Zone District Bldg. Ht. (ft.) Min. Lot Width (ft.)Front Side Rear Min. Lot Area (sq. ft.)Site Coverage A 18-28 50-60 30 20 25 215,000 N/A A-1 20-28 200 30 20 20-25 43,000-215,000 40% R-1 28 60 20-25 10-15 20 5,000-20,000 45% R-2 15-30 60-70 20 6-12 20 ft./20% lot depth, whichever is greater 8,500-15,000 40% R-3 30 70 20 6-18 20 ft./20% lot depth, whichever is greater.9,300 40% RHS 30 70 20-25 10-15 25 20,000-400,000 45% R-1C 30 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Note: (a) Maximum number of units cannot exceed that allowed by the General Plan, pursuant to the Zoning Ordinance. Source: Cupertino Municipal Code, 2014. Table 4.2: R3 District Development Example Assumptions Parcel Size (Sq. Ft.)43,560 Maximum Density 20.13 9,300 sq. ft. of lot area for 3 units, 2,000 sq. ft. for each additional unit. Parking and circulation (sq. ft.)19,602 Parking and circulation 45% of lot area Open space (sq. ft.)6,534 Open space 15% of lot area Lot Coverage (sq. ft.)17,424 Lot Coverage %40% of lot area Residential Sq. Ft.34,848 Stories of Residential 2 Less Common Area (hallways, stairs)(6.970)Common Area %20% of total building area Sq. Ft. for Units 27,878 Number of Units 20 Unit Size (Sq. Ft.)1,400 Source: City of Cupertino, 2014. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PLANNED DEVELOPMENT The planned development district (P district) is intended to provide a means for guiding land development that is uniquely suited for planned coordination of land uses and to provide for a greater flexibility of land use intensity and design. The planned development zoning district is specifically intended to encourage variety in the development pattern of the community; to promote a more desirable living environment; to encourage creative approaches in land development; to provide a means of reducing the amount of improvements required in development through better design and land planning, to conserve natural features, to facilitate a more aesthetic and efficient use of open spaces, and to encourage the creation of public or private common open space. All P districts are identified on the zoning map with the letter P followed by a specific reference to the type of use allowed in the particular planned development district. For example, a P(Res) district allows for residential uses. Developments within a P district are generally required to comply with the height and density regulations associated with the underlying use. Additionally, the P District contains specific provisions allowing the densities shown on sites designated as Priority Housing Sites. Beyond density and height regulations, the P district allows for a greater degree of flexibility around other development standards. The increased flexibility in the P zones allow a project to be designed to the special characteristics of a site (such as corner parcels, proximity to a creek or open space, etc.) without requiring variances or exceptions. Such sites can include a combination of multiple housing types, open space and a mix of uses in a single area. Examples include the Main Street Cupertino and Rose Bowl mixed use developments. A majority of the housing sites proposed to accommodate the RHNA are located in the P district, which specifically allows the densities shown on these sites. The majority of the P districts are governed by a Specific or Conceptual Plan which provides additional guidance to facilitate development review and provide more certainty regarding community expectations. For example, the Heart of the City Specific Plan provides detailed guidelines for residential and mixed-use developments (including orientation, design, setbacks, landscaping, buffers, and transitions to neighboring properties). Prior to development within a P (Res/R3) district, applicants must submit a definitive development plan to the Planning Commission or City Council. Upon recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council reviews larger B-68 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-69 developments, including those with eight or more residential units. Multi-family residential developments within a P(Res/R3) district are permitted uses by right. Development plans focus on site and architectural merits and typically take between two to four months to obtain approvals. The Municipal Code was amended in 2011 to clarify that the development plan for residential uses only requires a planned development permit and not a conditional use permit as residential developments are permitted uses within a P(Res) district. A AGRICULTURAL AND A-1 AGRICULTURAL-RESIDENTIAL Agricultural zones are intended to preserve agriculture or forestry activities in areas suited to that purpose, and to include incidental residential development of a rural or semi-rural character. Single-family dwellings and residences for farmworkers and their families are permitted in the A and A-1 Districts. Minimum lot area corresponds to the number (multiplied by one thousand square feet) following the A zoning symbol. For example, A1-43 requires a minimum 43,000 square foot lot. The minimum lot size for the A District is 215,000 square feet (with or without incidental residential use) and 215,000 square feet for A-1 with no incidental residential use. Incidental residential uses require a minimum of 43,000 square feet per dwelling unit. The District requires setbacks of 30 feet in the front yard, 20 feet in the side yards, and 20-25 feet in the rear yard. The maximum building height of 28 feet allows for a wide range of single family housing types on flat terrain. Structures in the A District with an “i” designation at the end are limited to one story (18 feet). OTHER DISTRICTS In addition to the districts discussed above, limited residential uses are allowed in other zoning districts. Often the housing in these non-residential districts is limited to housing for employees or caretakers. The permitted residential uses in non-residential districts are discussed below. ML LIGHT INDUSTRIAL Residential dwellings for caretakers or watchmen are permitted for those employed for the protection of the principal light industrial permitted use. The residential dwellings must be provided on the same lot as the principal permitted use. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PR PARK AND RECREATION The PR District regulates publicly owned parks within the City. Single-family residences for the purpose of housing a caretaker for the park are permitted in this District. A caretaker is defined as a person who maintains surveillance of the park areas during and after the hours of park operation. The residence may take the form of a mobile home or a permanent residential structure. HEART OF THE CITY The Heart of the City Specific Plan provides specific development guidance for one of the most important commercial corridors in the City of Cupertino. This Specific Plan is intended to carefully guide development, with the purpose of creating a clear sense of place and community identity in Cupertino. The Specific Plan contains streetscape design, development standards and design guidelines for multi-unit residential and commercial/office projects. Any new residential development within the Heart of the City Specific Plan area is required to include a nonresidential component (that is, horizontal or vertical mixed use is required if residential uses are proposed). For mixed use developments in the Heart of the City Specific Plan area, residential development density calculations are required to be based on net density, excluding parking and/or land areas devoted to the commercial portion of the development. This requirement can significantly reduce the number of units a proposed project may provide, and may constrain new development, although it will forward City goals for balanced and complementary land uses. However, for sites designated as Priority Housing Sites in the Housing Element, the P District has been amended to allow the densities shown in the Housing Element as a permitted use. PARKING Excessive parking requirements may serve as a constraint of housing development by increasing development costs and reducing the amount of land available for project amenities or additional units. Off-street residential parking requirements vary by zone. As shown in Table 4.3, the parking ratio ranges from two parking spaces per dwelling unit to four spaces per dwelling unit. Cupertino’s parking requirements are higher than many other jurisdictions, particularly for single-family homes. Given the high cost of land and parking, the high parking standards may serve as a constraint to housing provision, although projects are able to attain the maximum permitted density even with these parking requirements. The Zoning Ordinance does not include parking B-70 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 4.3: Off-Street Parking Requirements Housing Type Zone Parking Ratio Single-Family R-1, RHS, A-1, P 4 / DU (2 garage, 2 open) Small Lot Single-Family, Townhouse P 2.8 / DU (2 garage, 0.8 open) Duplex R-2 3 / DU (1.5 enclosed, 1.5 open) High Density Multi-Family R-3, P 2 / DU (1 covered, 1 open) Source: Cupertino Zoning Ordinance, 2014. B-71 reductions for senior housing, affordable housing, or group homes, unless State Density Bonus law applies, in which case reductions are available for senior housing and projects that include affordable housing. Often, vehicle ownership among elderly and lower-income households is lower than other populations, making reductions in parking requirements appropriate. As established in Strategy HE-2.3.6 of this Housing Element, the City will offer a range of incentives to facilitate the development of affordable housing, including parking standards waivers. The Zoning Ordinance allows for shared parking in mixed-use developments. For example, residential projects with a retail or commercial component will have a lower parking requirement because residential users may use some retail parking spaces in the evening. The Zoning Ordinance provides a formula for calculating the parking reduction in mixed-use developments. In addition, the Planning Commission or City Council may allow further reduction in the parking requirement as part of a use permit development plan or parking exception based on shared parking arrangements, parking surveys, and parking demand management measures. According to interviews conducted as part of the Housing Element update in 2013, market-rate and non-profit developers perceive policies and regulations such as parking requirements, height limits, and variances for density as barriers to developing and adding units to the market. One interviewee noted that Cupertino’s parking requirements are relatively stringent compared to other cities on the Peninsula that are moving towards more flexibility and lower requirements. To address this concern, the City offers reduced parking requirements as incentives to facilitate affordable housing (Strategy 11) and has updated the Density Bonus Ordinance (Strategy 12) consistent with State law to allow for reduced parking and one to three regulatory concessions that would result in identifiable cost reductions and which are needed to make proposed housing affordable. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) PROVISIONS FOR A VARIETY OF HOUSING TYPES Housing element law specifies that jurisdictions must identify adequate sites through appropriate zoning and development standards to encourage the development of various types of housing. This includes single- and multi-family housing, homeless shelters, group homes, supportive and transitional housing, single-room occupancy (SROs), mobile and manufactured homes, among others. HOMELESS SHELTERS The Zoning Ordinance allows for permanent and rotating homeless shelters in the Quasi Public Building (BQ) zone. Rotating homeless shelters are permitted within existing church structures in the BQ zone for up to 25 occupants. The operation period of rotating shelters cannot exceed two months in any one-year span at a single location. Permanent emergency shelter facilities are permitted in the BQ zone if the facility is limited to 25 occupants, provides a management plan, and if occupancy is limited to six months or fewer. The City included Strategy HE-5.1.1 in the Housing Element to ensure continued facilitation of housing opportunities for special needs persons through emergency housing options. GROUP HOMES AND TRANSITIONAL AND SUPPORTIVE HOUSING Pursuant to state law, licensed residential care facilities for six or fewer residents are permitted by right in all residential districts (including A, A-1, R-1, R-2, R-3, RHS, R-1C). Licensed small group homes are not subject to special development requirements, policies, or procedures which would impede such uses from locating in a residential district. Furthermore, small group homes (with six or fewer persons) with continuous 24-hour care are permitted by right in all residential districts. Transitional and supportive housing is treated as a residential use and subject only to those restrictions that apply to other residential uses in the same zone. Large group homes (with more than six residents) are conditionally permitted uses in the R-1 District, subject to Planning Commission approval. SINGLE-ROOM OCCUPANCY UNITS (SROS) SRO units are one-room units intended for occupancy by a single individual. They are distinct from a studio or efficiency unit, in that a studio is a one-room unit B-72 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-73 that must contain a kitchen and bathroom. Although SRO units are not required to have a kitchen or bathroom, many SROs have one or the other. The Cupertino Zoning Ordinance does not contain specific provisions for SRO units. SRO units are treated as a regular multi-family use, subject to the same restrictions that apply to other residential uses in the same zone. MANUFACTURED HOUSING Manufactured housing and mobile homes can be an affordable housing option for low- and moderate-income households. According to the Department of Finance, as of 2013, there are no mobile homes in Cupertino. Pursuant to State law, a mobile home built after June 15, 1976, certified under the National Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Act of 1974, and built on a permanent foundation may be located in any residential zone where a conventional single-family detached dwelling is permitted subject to the same restrictions on density and to the same property development regulations. FARMWORKER AND EMPLOYEE HOUSING Pursuant to the State Employee Housing Act, any employee housing consisting of no more than 36 beds in a group quarters or 12 units or spaces designed for use by a single family or household shall be deemed an agricultural land use. No conditional use permit (CUP), zoning variance, or other zoning clearance shall be required of this employee housing that is not required of any other agricultural activity in the same zone. The permitted occupancy in employee housing in a zone allowing agricultural uses shall include agricultural employees who do not work on the property where the employee housing is located. The Employee Housing Act also specifies that housing for six or fewer employees be treated as a residential use. In 2014, the City amended the Zoning Ordinance to be consistent with the State Employee Housing Act, permitting employee housing for six or fewer residents in all residential zoning districts and employee group quarters in the A and A-1 districts, and in the RHS district with approval of an Administrative CUP. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) SECOND DWELLING UNITS A second dwelling unit is an attached or detached, self-contained unit on a single-family residential lot. These units are often affordable due to their smaller size. To promote the goal of affordable housing within the City, Cupertino’s Zoning Ordinance permits second dwelling units on lots in Single-Family Residential (R-1), Residential Hillside (RHS), Agricultural (A), and Agricultural Residential (A-1) Districts. Second dwelling units on lots of 10,000 square feet or more may not exceed 800 square feet, while units on lots smaller than 10,000 square feet cannot exceed 640 square feet. All second dwelling units must have direct outside access without going through the principal dwelling. If the residential lot encompasses less than 10,000 square feet, the second dwelling unit must be attached to the principal dwelling unless otherwise approved by the Director of Community Development through Architectural Review. Second dwelling units are subject to an architectural review by the Director of Community Development. The design and building materials of the proposed second unit must be consistent with the principal dwelling. In addition, the second dwelling unit may not require excessive grading which is visible from a public street or adjoining private property. The architectural review is done at the ministerial (building permit) level and is intended to ensure that the second unit is consistent with the architecture, colors, and materials of the primary house. One additional off-street parking space must be provided if the principal dwelling unit has less than the minimum off-street parking spaces for the residential district in which it is located. Second dwelling units must also comply with the underlying site development regulations specified by the zoning district. DENSITY BONUS State law requires cities and counties to grant a density bonus of up to 35 percent and one to three incentives or concessions to housing projects which contain one of the following: • At least 5% of the housing units are restricted to very low income residents • At least 10% of the housing units are restricted to lower income residents • At least 10% of the housing units in a for-sale common interest development are restricted to moderate income residents B-74 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-75 A density bonus, but no incentives or concessions, must be granted to projects that contain one of the following: • The project donates at least one acre of land to the city or county large enough for 40 very low income units, the land has the appropriate general plan designation, zoning, permits and approvals, and access to public facilities needed for such housing, funding has been identified, and other requirements are met • The project is a senior citizen housing development (no affordable units required) • The project is a mobile home park age restricted to senior citizens (no affordable units required) The City adopted amendments to the Municipal Code in 2014 to conform with State law. Strategy HE-2.3.7 in the Housing Plan commits the City to implementation of the Density Bonus Ordinance. SITE IMPROVEMENT REQUIREMENTS Residential developers are responsible for constructing road, water, sewer, and storm drainage improvements on new housing sites. Where a project has off-site impacts, such as increased runoff or added congestion at a nearby intersection, additional developer expenses may be necessary to mitigate impacts. These expenses may be passed on to consumers. Chapter 18 of the Cupertino Municipal Code (the Subdivision Ordinance) establishes the requirements for new subdivisions, including the provision of on- and off-site improvements. The ordinance requires that subdivisions comply with frontage requirements and stormwater runoff be collected and conveyed by an approved storm drain system. Furthermore, each unit or lot within the subdivision must be served by an approved sanitary sewer system, domestic water system, and gas, electric, telephone, and cablevision facilities. All utilities within the subdivision and along peripheral streets must be placed underground. Common residential street widths in Cupertino range from 20 feet (for streets with no street parking) to 36 feet (for those with parking on both sides). The City works with developers to explore various street design options to meet their needs and satisfy public safety requirements. Developers are typically required APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) to install curb, gutters, and sidewalks, however, there is a process where the City Council can waive the requirement. The City prefers detached sidewalks with a landscaped buffer in between the street and the pedestrian walk to enhance community aesthetics and improve pedestrian safety. However, the City does work with developers to explore various frontage improvement options depending on the project objectives, taking into consideration factors such as tree preservation, land/design constraints, pedestrian safety, and neighborhood pattern/compatibility. This is especially true in Planned Development projects, where the City works with the developer to achieve creative and flexible street and sidewalk designs to maximize the project as well as community benefits. The Subdivision Ordinance also includes land dedication and fee standards for parkland. The formula for dedication of park land for residential development is based on a standard of three acres of parkland per 1,000 persons. The developer must dedicate parkland based on this formula or pay an in lieu fee based on the fair market value of the land. In addition to parkland dedication, the City Council may require a subdivider to dedicate lands to the school district(s) as a condition of approval of the final subdivision map. If school site dedication is required and the school district accepts the land within 30 days, the district must repay the subdivider the original cost of the dedicated land plus the cost of any improvements, taxes, and maintenance of the dedicated land. If the school district does not accept the offer, the dedication is terminated. The developer may also be required to reserve land for a park, recreational facility, fire station, library, or other public use if such a facility is shown on an adopted specific plan or adopted general plan. The public agency benefiting from the reserved land shall pay the developer the market value of the land at the time of the filing of the tentative map and any other costs incurred by the developer in the maintenance of the area. The ordinance states that the amount of land to be reserved shall not make development of the remaining land held by the developer economically unfeasible. The City of Cupertino’s site improvement requirements for new subdivisions are consistent with those in surrounding jurisdictions and do not pose a significant constraint to new housing development. B-76 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-77 BUILDING CODES AND CODE ENFORCEMENT The City of Cupertino has adopted the 2013 Edition of the California Building Code, the 2013 California Electrical Code and Uniform Administrative Code Provisions, the International Association of Plumbing Officials Uniform Plumbing Code (2013 Edition), the California Mechanical Code 2013 Edition, and the 2013 California Fire Code and the 2013 Green Building Standard Code. The City also enforces the 1997 Edition of the Uniform Housing Code, the 1998 Uniform Code for Building Conservation, and the 1997 Uniform Code for the Abatement of Dangerous Buildings Code. Cupertino has adopted several amendments to the 2013 California Building Code. The City requires sprinkler systems for new and expanded one- and two-family dwellings and townhouses; underhanging appendages enclosed with fire-resistant materials; roof coverings on new buildings and replacement roofs complying with the standards established for Class A roofing, the most fire resistant type of roof covering. The amendments also establish minimum standards for building footings, seismic reinforcing on attached multi-family dwellings, and brace wall panel construction. These amendments apply more stringent requirements than the California Building Code. The California Building Code and the City’s amendments to it have been adopted to prevent unsafe or hazardous building conditions. The City’s building codes are reasonable and would not adversely affect the ability to construct housing in Cupertino. The City’s code enforcement program is an important tool for maintaining the housing stock and protecting residents from unsafe or unsightly conditions. The Code Enforcement Division is responsible for enforcing the provisions of the Cupertino Municipal Code and various other related codes and policies. Code Enforcement Division staff work to achieve compliance through intervention, education, and enforcement, partnering with the community to enforce neighborhood property maintenance standards. Code Enforcement staff investigate and enforce City codes and State statutes based on complaints received. Violation of a code regulation can result in a warning, citation, fine, or legal action. If a code violation involves a potential emergency, officers will respond immediately; otherwise, Code Enforcement staff responds to complaints through scheduled inspections. The City has had to declare only three units unfit for human occupancy since 2007 and most APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) complaints are resolved readily. Code Enforcement activities are not considered a constraint to development of housing in Cupertino. CONSTRAINTS FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES California Senate Bill 520 (SB 520), passed in October 2001, requires local housing elements to evaluate constraints for persons with disabilities and develop programs which accommodate the housing needs of disabled persons. PROCEDURES FOR ENSURING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION Both the federal Fair Housing Act and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act impose an affirmative duty on cities and counties to make reasonable accommodations in their zoning and land use policies when such accommodations are necessary to provide equal access to housing for persons with disabilities and do not impose significant administrative or financial burdens on local government or undermine the fundamental purpose of the zoning law. Reasonable accommodations refer to modifications or exemptions to particular policies that facilitate equal access to housing. Examples include exemptions to setbacks for wheelchair access structures or to height limits to permit elevators. The City of Cupertino adopted an ordinance in April 2010 for people with disabilities to make a reasonable accommodations request. Chapter 19.25 provides a procedure to request reasonable accommodation for persons with disabilities seeking equal access to housing under the Federal Fair Housing Act, the Federal Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988, and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act. ZONING AND OTHER LAND USE REGULATIONS In conformance to state law, licensed residential care facilities for six or fewer residents are permitted by right in all residential districts (including A, A-1, R-1, R-2, R-3, RHS, R-1C). Licensed small group homes are not subject to special development requirements, policies, or procedures which would impede such uses from locating in a residential district. Furthermore, small group homes (with six or fewer persons) with continuous 24-hour care are permitted by right in all residential districts, as are transitional and supportive housing. Large group homes (with more than six residents) are conditionally permitted uses in the R-1 District, subject to Planning Commission approval. B-78 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-79 The Zoning Ordinance contains a broad definition of family. A family means an individual or group of persons living together who constitute a bona fide single housekeeping unit in a dwelling unit. Families are distinguished from groups occupying a hotel, lodging club, fraternity or sorority house, or institution of any kind. This definition of family does not limit the number of people living together in a household and does not require them to be related. BUILDING CODES AND PERMITTING The City’s Building Code does not include any amendments to the California Building Code that might diminish the ability to accommodate persons with disabilities. BELOW MARKET RATE MITIGATION PROGRAM The City’s BMR Residential Mitigation Program requires all new residential developers to either provide below market rate units or pay a mitigation fee, which is placed in the City’s Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF). The BMR Mitigation Program is based on a nexus study prepared by the City that demonstrated that all new developments create a need for affordable housing. Under this program, developers of for-sale housing where units may be sold individually must sell at least 15 percent of units at a price affordable to median- and moderate-income households. Projects of seven or more units must provide on-site BMR units. Developers of projects of six units or fewer can either build a unit or provide pay the Housing Mitigation fee. To be consistent with recent court decisions and the State Costa-Hawkins Act regarding rent control, the City modified the BMR Mitigation Program so that developers of market-rate rental units, where the units cannot be sold individually, pay the Housing Mitigation fee to the Affordable Housing Trust Fund. In 2014, the fee was $3.00 per square foot on residential. The BMR Office and Industrial Mitigation Program also acknowledges housing needs created by the development of office and industrial projects and provide fees to support the development of affordable housing. In 2014, the fee was $6.00 per square foot on office/industrial, hotel, and retail, and $3.00 per square foot in the Planned Industrial zone. 4 4 The housing mitigation fee is updated periodically. Developers should check with the Community Development Department for the most current fee amount. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Although concerns exist that inclusionary housing programs like Cupertino’s BMR Mitigation Program may constrain production of market rate homes, studies have shown evidence to the contrary. The cost of an inclusionary housing requirement must ultimately be borne by either: 1) developers through a lower return, 2) landowners through decreased land values, or 3) other homeowners through higher market rate sale prices. In fact, the cost of inclusionary housing and any other development fee “will always be split between all players in the development process.”5 However, academics have pointed out that, over the long term, it is probable that landowners will bear most of the costs of inclusionary housing, not other homeowners or the developer. 6 In addition, a 2004 study on housing starts between 1981 and 2001 in communities throughout California with and without inclusionary housing programs evidences that inclusionary housing programs do not lead to a decline in housing production. In fact, the study found that housing production actually increased after passage of local inclusionary housing ordinances in cities as diverse as San Diego, Carlsbad, and Sacramento.7 Recognizing the need for a financially feasible program that does not constrain production, some jurisdictions allow developers to pay a fee for all units, regardless of project size. As discussed previously, Cupertino’s BMR Mitigation Program requires large for-sale developments (with seven or more units) to provide units. A 2009 court case (Palmer v. the City of Los Angeles) has resulted in cities suspending or amending the portion of their Housing Mitigation program requiring affordable units to be included in market rate rental developments. There also have been a number of court cases related to affordable housing requirements (decided and those that are still being litigated). Due to uncertainty regarding the legal standard applicable to affordable housing requirements, the Governor vetoed an Assembly Bill (AB 1229) which aimed to reverse the decision in the Palmer case. Currently pending in the California Supreme Court is a challenge to the City of San Jose’s inclusionary ordinance. The Building Industry Association asserts that all programs requiring affordable housing, whether for sale or for rent, must be justified by a nexus study showing that the affordable 5 W.A. Watkins. “Impact of Land Development Charges.” Land Economics 75(3). 1999. 6 Mallach, A.“Inclusionary Housing Programs: Policies and Practices.” New Brunswick, NJ: Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University. 1984. Hagman, D. “Taking Care of One’s Own Through Inclusionary Zoning: Bootstrapping Low-and Moderate-Income Housing by Local Government,” Urban Law and Policy 5:169- 187. 1982. Ellickson, R. 1985. “Inclusionary Zoning: Who Pays?” Planning 51(8):18-20. 7 David Rosen. “Inclusionary Housing and Its Impact on Housing and Land Markets.” NHC Affordable Housing Policy Review 1(3). 2004. B-80 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-81 housing requirement is “reasonably related” to the impacts of the project on the need for affordable housing. In a previous California Supreme Court case, Sterling Park v. City of Palo Alto, the Court ruled that affordable housing requirements were a type of exaction that could be challenged under the protest provisions of the Mitigation Fee Act. The City of Cupertino has long justified its Housing Mitigation program as based on the impacts of market rate housing on the need for affordable housing and continues to require rental housing developments to pay a mitigation fee. However, the fee is based on an older nexus study. The City intends to update its nexus study on the BMR mitigation fees by the end of 2015 to determine appropriate housing mitigation fees (Strategy HE-2.3.3). PARK IMPACT FEES The City assesses park impact fees for new residential development. The fee ranges from $14,850 per unit of high density residential development (at 20 dwelling units per acre or more) and for apartments with ten or more units to $28,875 per single-family unit (where the density is 0 to 5 units per acre). Park impact fees for senior/elderly housing is $4,500 per unit. Cupertino’s park fees are comparable to or lower than similar requirements established in other Santa Clara County jurisdictions. Mountain View and San Jose require park land dedication or the payment of a park in-lieu fee. The in- lieu fee in both cities is based on fair market value of the land. San Jose’s park fees for single-family detached units ranged from approximately $15,000 to $38,550, depending on building square footage and the area of the city. Park fees for multi-family units in San Jose ranged from $7,650 to $35,600, depending on location and the size of the development. In Mountain View, park in-lieu fees are approximately $25,000 for each residential unit, depending on the value of the land. The City of Palo Alto’s park dedication requirements vary depending on whether the project involves a subdivision or parcel map, and also depending on the size of the unit. Palo Alto collects $10,638-$15,885 per single-family unit and $3,521-$6,963 per multi-family unit. FEES AND EXACTIONS Like cities throughout California, Cupertino collects development fees to recover the capital costs of providing community services and the administrative costs associated with processing applications. New housing typically requires payment APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) of school impact fees, sewer and water connection fees, building permit fees, wastewater treatment plant fees, and a variety of handling and service charges. Typical fees collected are outlined in Table 4.4. The total cost of permits, city fees, and other professional services fees (such as project-specific architecture and engineering designs and schematics) has been estimated to equate to 20 percent of construction costs, or approximately 10 percent of total project costs. The Bay Area Cost of Development Survey 2010-2011 conducted by the City of San Jose surveyed six jurisdictions in the region with sample development projects to determine associated entitlement, construction, and impact fees. For a multi-family development, total fees identified by this survey ranged from $4,841 per unit for the County of Santa Clara to $42,183 per unit for the City of Palo Alto. These fees have likely increased since the time of the survey, and therefore a conservative indication that Cupertino’s fees (estimated at $30,851 for a similar building type) are consistent with, and often less than, fees in surrounding jurisdictions. PERMIT PROCESSING The entitlement process can impact housing production costs, with lengthy processing of development applications adding to financing costs, in particular. PLANNING COMMISSION AND CITY COUNCIL APPROVALS The Planning Commission and City Council review applications for zoning amendments and subdivision approvals. The Planning Commission holds a public hearing about proposed zoning changes or subdivisions and makes a recommendation to the City Council to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the application. Upon receipt of the Planning Commission’s recommendation, the City Council holds a public hearing before making a final decision on the proposed zoning change or subdivision. Local developers have noted that the entitlement process in Cupertino can be a time consuming and protracted process. While the active public may add complexity to the entitlement process, Cupertino values public outreach and is committed to development of community leadership, local partnerships, an active populace and making government more accessible and visible to residents. B-82 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 4.4: Fees and Exactions Fee Amount Single-Family (a) Townhouse (b)Multi-Family (c) Sanitary Connection Permit (d) $76 permit fee or $77.50 with backflow plus additional $300 inspection fee $376 $378 $378 Water Main Existing Facilities Fee (e) Fees based on construction costs with large variation dependent on fire safety requirements and size of water line. $7,000 $6,900 $2,300 Parcel Map (1-4 lots) - Planning Fee $7,461 N/A N/A N/A Tract Map (> 4 lots) - Planning Fee $15,974 $1,597 $1,597 N/A Residential Design Review/ Architectural and Site Approval $2,400/$7,461 $2,400 $746 $149 Development Permit Fee $15,974 $1,597 $1,597 $319 Parcel Map (1-4 lots) - Engineering Fee $4,254 N/A N/A N/A Tract Map (> 4 lots) - Engineering Fee $8,831 $883 $883 N/A Engineering Plan Review Fee $736 $368 $124 Grading Permit Fee $750 $350 $601 Master Storm Drainage Area Fee Varies $906 $555 $378 Storm Management Plan Fee $715 $71.50 $71.50 $71.50 Park Impact Fee Varies by density $28,875 $16,500 $14,850 Housing Mitigation In-Lieu Fee $3.00 / Sq. Ft.$6,000 $4,800 $4,200 Cupertino Union School District Fee $2.02 / Sq. Ft.$4,040 $3,232 $2,828 Fremont Union High School District Fee $1.34 / Sq. Ft.$2,680 $2,144 $1,876 Plan Check and Inspection (Engineering)$655 $655 $655 $655 Building Permit Fee (f)Based on scope of project $7,409 $6,473 $2,121 Total (g)$65,976 $47,250 $30,851 Notes: (a) Fees estimated for a 3,150 square foot, 3 bedroom home in a 10 unit subdivision with 7,000 sq. ft. lots over 2 acres. (b) Fees estimated for a 2,200 square foot, 3 bedroom/2.5 bathroom townhouse in a 10 unit subdivision over one acre. (c) Fees estimated for a 50 unit apartment development with 1,680 gross square foot (1,400 net), 2 bedroom apartment units over 2.2 acres (d) Average of fees charged in the four Cupertino Sanitary District zones. (e) Connectiom fee for San Jose Water, which serves the largest area of Cupertino. Cal Water and Cupertino Municipal also serve parts of the City. (f) Includes all fees payable to the Building Department. Includes Plan check and standard inspection fees, and Construction Tax. (g) Reflects 2014 adopted fees. Fees are subject to change. Sources: City of Cupertino, 2014; San Jose Water, 2014; Cupertino Sanitary District, 2014; MIG 2014 B-83 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-84 DESIGN REVIEW Cupertino has not adopted citywide residential design guidelines. However, all Planned Development Zoning Districts, the R1 District, RHS District, the Heart of the City Specific Plan Area, and the North De Anza Boulevard Conceptual Plan Area are subject to design guidelines. These design guidelines pertain to features such as landscaping, building and roof forms, building entrances, colors, outdoor lighting, and building materials. The design guidelines are intended to ensure development is consistent with the existing neighborhood character and are generally not considered significant constraints to housing production. The Heart of the City Specific Plan design guidelines are intended to promote high-quality private-sector development, enhance property values, and ensure that both private investment and public activity continues to be attracted to the Stevens Creek Boulevard Special Area. Design guidelines promote retention and development viability of single-family residential sized lots in the transition area between Stevens Creek Boulevard fronting development and single-family neighborhoods. The City requires design review for certain residential developments to ensure that new development and changes to existing developments comply with City development requirements and policies. These include: • Variances in the R-1 District • Two-story residential developments in the R-1 District where second floor to first floor area ration is greater than 66 percent and/or where second story side yard setback(s) are less than 15 feet to a property line • Two-story addition, new two-story home, and/or second story deck in the R1-a zone • Any new development or modifications in planned development residential or mixed-use residential zoning districts • Single-family homes in a planned development residential zoning district • Modifications to buildings in the R1-C or R-2 zoning districts • Signs, landscaping, parking plans, and modifications to buildings in the R-3 zoning district The City has detailed Two-Story Design Principles incorporated in the R-1 District. These design principles help integrate new homes and additions to existing homes with existing neighborhoods by providing a framework for the APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-85 review and approval process. Two-story homes with a second story to first floor ratio greater than 66 percent and homes with second story side setbacks less than 15 feet must offset building massing with designs that encompass higher quality architectural features and materials. Design Review may occur at the Staff or Design Review Committee level, depending on the scope of the project. Staff and the Design Review Committee, consisting of the Planning Commission Vice Chair and one other Planning Commissioner, consider factors such as building scale in relation to existing buildings, compliance with adopted height limits, setbacks, architectural and landscape design guidelines, and design harmony between new and existing buildings to determine design compliance. PROCESSING TIME Table 4.5 presents the typical permit processing time for various approvals in Cupertino. As shown, actions requiring ministerial review are usually approved within two to four weeks. Other approvals have longer processing time frames. Developments requiring multiple approvals involve joint applications and permits that are processed concurrently. All approvals for a particular project are reviewed in a single Planning Commission and/or City Council meeting. The typical permit processing times in Cupertino are similar to or lower than those in other jurisdictions and do not pose a major constraint to new development in the City. Cupertino is able to process applications in a timely manner because City staff works closely with applicants during a pre-application process. The pre-application is free of charge and its duration may vary depending on the completeness and/or the complexity of the project. Typical pre-application process may consist of the following: • Initial preliminary consultation with property owners/developers to go over project objectives and City development standards • Submittal and review of conceptual development plans • Preliminary consultations with relevant City departments (i.e., Fire, Building, Public Works) as deemed necessary • Submittal and review of pre-submittal materials and final plans APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 4.6 summarizes the typical approvals required for various housing types. One-story single-family homes in properly zoned areas do not require approvals from the Community Development Department. However, two-story single- family homes require a two-story permit, which are approved by the Director of the Community Development Department and take two to three months to process. Residential subdivisions require a tentative parcel map or tentative subdivision map, depending on the number of units in the development, and take two to four months to receive approvals. Multi-family residential developments in R3 or Planned Development (PD) Districts are typically approved in two to four months. BUILDING PERMIT Standard plan check and building permit issuance for single-family dwellings in Cupertino takes approximately 10 business days. Plan checks for large additions, remodels, and major structural upgrades for single-family homes are also processed within 10 days. If a second review is necessary, the City will take approximately five business days to complete the review. Prior to the final building permit inspection for two-story additions and new two-story homes, applicants must submit a privacy protection plan, which illustrates how views into neighboring yards second story windows will be screened by new trees and/ or shrubs. The plan check process may take longer for projects which entail off- site street improvements. B-86 Table 4.5: Typical Permit Processing Time (a) Type of Approval Typical Processing Time Ministerial Review 2-4 weeks Two-Story Residential Permit 2-3 months Conditional Use Permit 2-4 months Zoning Change 4-6 months General Plan Amendment 4-6 months Architectural and Site Review 2-4 months Design Review 2-3 months Tentative or Parcel Map 2-4 months Initial Environmental Study 2 months Negative Declaration 3-6 months Environmental Impact Report 9-15 months Notes: (a) Processing time accounts for time involved in the preliminary consultation and/or conceptual review phase Applications for multiple approval types may be processed concurrently. Processing time would depend on time required to prepare environmental documents. Sources: City of Cupertino, 2014 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-87 Table 4.6: Typical Processing Procedures by Project Type Typical Approvals Required Time Frame* Single-Family One-Story (No Planning Permit required)Building Permit 2-4 weeks One-Story (Minor Residential or Exception Permit required)Minor Residential Permit/ R1 Exception 1-2 months Two-Story Two-Story Permit 2-3 months Residential Hillside (no Exception)Building Permit 2-6 weeks Residential Hillside (with Exception)Hillside Exception 2-3 months Subdivision < 5 units Tentative Parcel Map 2-3 months ≥ 5 units Tentative Subdivision Map 3-4 months Multi-Family – R2, R3 No re-zoning Development Permit, Architectural Site Approval 2-3 months <5 parcels Tentative Parcel Map 2-3 months ≥5 parcels Tentative Subdivision Map 3-4 months Re-zoning Rezoning Application 4-6 monthsDevelopment Permit, Architectural Site Approval Tentative or Parcel Map (depending on number of parcels) Multi-Family – PD No re-zoning Development Permit 3-4 monthsArchitectural Site Approval Tentative or Parcel Map Re-zoning Zoning change 4-6 monthsDevelopment Permit Architectural Site Approval Tentative or Parcel Map * May vary based on on level of Environmental Review required. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-88 Over-the-counter plan checks are available for small residential projects (250 square feet or less). Building Department staff typically review these projects in less than 30 minutes during normal business hours. In addition, an express plan check is offered for medium-sized residential projects (500 square feet or less) and takes approximately five days. Plan review can take from four weeks to several months for larger projects, depending on the size. Examples of this type of plan check include apartments and single-family residential subdivisions over 10 units. Cupertino’s building permit procedures are reasonable and comparable to those in other California communities. TREE PRESERVATION The City of Cupertino has a Protected Tree Ordinance that is intended to preserve trees for their environmental, economic and aesthetic importance. The City seeks to retain as many trees as possible, consistent with the individual rights to develop, maintain, and enjoy their property. The ordinance protects heritage trees, which are identified as significant for their historic value or unique characteristics, and certain trees that have a minimum single-trunk diameter of 10 inches or a minimum multi-truck diameter of 20 inches when measured at 4.5 feet from natural grade. These trees include native oak tree species, California Buckeye, Big Leaf Maple, Deodar Cedar, Blue Atlas Cedar, Bay Laurel or California Bay, and Western Sycamore trees. Trees protected by this ordinance may not be removed from private or public property without first obtaining a tree removal permit. Applications for tree removal permits are reviewed by the Community Development Director. The Director may approve, conditionally approve, or deny applications. In some cases, the City may require tree replacement as a condition of permit approval. Because a large share of residential development in Cupertino involves infill development involving demolition and replacement, building footprints are often already in place and tree preservation issues do not often arise as a major concern to developers. 4.2 ECONOMIC AND MARKET CONSTRAINTS In addition to governmental constraints, non-governmental factors may constrain the production of new housing. These could include economic and market related conditions such as land and construction costs. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) AVAILABILITY OF FINANCING While the housing market has rebounded since the recession that began in 2008, many developers still face difficulty securing project financing. In interviews completed as part of the Housing Element update process in 2013, it was stated that small developers in particular still have trouble, and some lenders do not understand how to finance mixed-use development. PROJECT FUNDING In stakeholder interviews in late 2013, affordable housing developers and service providers discussed the hardships caused by the dissolution of the Redevelopment Agencies. This action eliminated a major source of funding for affordable housing, and that these funds have not yet been replaced by other tools. Federal and state funding sources (including Sections 202 and 811) have been eliminated or reduced so there is greater reliance on local sources. LAND AVAILABILITY AND COSTS Land costs in Cupertino are very high due to high demand and extremely limited supply of available land. Cupertino has seen a number of smaller detached infill housing projects where single-family homes are constructed on remnant lots or lots that have previously been developed with older homes. Multi-family development often requires lot consolidation and/or removing existing uses. A review of available real estate listings indicated one residentially zoned vacant property for sale as of May 2014. This 0.22 acre property is zoned P(R-3) and had a listed price of $1,095,000. Based on this listing, an acre of residentially zoned land could be listed at close to $5 million. CONSTRUCTION COSTS Construction costs vary significantly depending on building materials and quality of finishes. Parking structures for multi-family developments represent another major variable in the development cost. In general, below-grade parking raises costs significantly. Soft costs (architectural and other professional fees, land carrying costs, transaction costs, construction period interest, etc.) comprise an additional 10 to 40 percent of the construction and land costs. Owner-occupied multi-family units have higher soft costs than renter-occupied units due to the increased need for construction defect liability insurance. Permanent debt financing, site preparation, off-site infrastructure, impact fees, and developer B-89 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) profit add to the total development cost of a project. Construction costs run about $100 per square foot for Type 5 construction (wood and stucco over parking) for multi-family units and $110 per square foot for single family units.8 Residential developers indicate that construction costs in the Bay Area may far exceed these national averages, and can reach $200 per square foot for larger (four- to six-story) developments. Key construction costs have risen nationally in conjunction with economic recovery and associated gains in the residential real estate market. Figure B-5 illustrates construction cost trends for key materials based on the Producer Price Index, a series of indices published by the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics that measures the sales price for specific commodities and products. Both steel and lumber prices have risen sharply since 2009, as have finished construction products. 4.3. ENVIRONMENTAL, INFRASTRUCTURE & PUBLIC SERVICE CONSTRAINTS ENVIRONMENTAL CONSTRAINTS The majority of Cupertino land area has been urbanized and now supports roadways, structures, other impervious surfaces, areas of turf, and ornamental landscaping. In general, urbanized areas tend to have low to poor wildlife habitat value due to replacement of natural communities, fragmentation of remaining open space areas and parks, and intensive human disturbance. There are no significant wetland or environmental resource issues of concern that would constrain development in areas designated for residential development in Cupertino. ROADS Due to the urbanized nature of Cupertino, existing roads are in place to serve the potential infill residential development identified in this Housing Element. The amount of traffic or congestion on a roadway is measured in terms of Level of Service (LOS) ranging from A to F, with A representing intersections that experience little or no congestion and F representing intersections with long and unacceptable delays. Cupertino has established a policy of maintaining a minimum of LOS D for major intersections during the morning and afternoon peak traffic hours, with some exceptions. The LOS standard for the Stevens 8 International Code Council Building Valuation Data for Type V construction, February 2014 B-90 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Producer Price Index: Steel and Lumber 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 YearProducer Price AxisSteel Lumber Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014; MIG, 2014 LU-1 FIGURE B-5 PRODUCER PRICE INDEX FOR KEY CONSTRUCTION COSTS B-91 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Creek and De Anza Boulevard intersection, the Stevens Creek and Stelling Road intersection, and the De Anza Boulevard and Bollinger Road intersection is LOS E+. The environmental assessment of individual residential projects considers any associated traffic impacts. If the study finds that the project could cause an intersection to deteriorate, mitigation may be required. This usually consists of improvements to adjacent roads and intersections, but may also include changes to the number of units in the project, or to site design and layout. However, SB 743, signed into law in 2013, started a process that could fundamentally change transportation impact analysis as part of CEQA compliance. These changes will include the elimination of auto delay, level of service (LOS), and other similar measures of vehicular capacity or traffic congestion as a basis for determining significant impacts in many parts of California (if not statewide). As such, potential costs to new development associated with roadway mitigation may be reduced or eliminated. WATER Two water suppliers provide service to the City: the California Water Company and the San Jose Water Company. The San Jose Water Company also has a lease agreement to operate and maintain the City of Cupertino’s water system until 2022. Both of these providers derive the vast majority of their water from the Santa Clara Valley Water District. According to the 2014 General Plan Amendment and Housing Element EIR, California Water Company and San Jose Water Company have sufficient water supplies to accommodate increased growth associated with the GPA and Housing Element under normal, single dry, or multiple dry years. Future development associated with the Housing Element would be located within already developed urban areas and would therefore connect to an existing water distribution system. No new water treatment facilities or the expansion of existing facilities would be required to accommodate the RHNA. WASTEWATER Cupertino Sanitary District (CSD) serves as the main provider of wastewater collection and treatment services for Cupertino, while the City of Sunnyvale serves a small portion of the Cupertino Urban Service area on the east side of the city. The City of Sunnyvale Wastewater Treatment Plant has a daily treatment B-92 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) capacity of 29 mgd capacity, of which approximately 15 mgd are being utilized in 2014. The CSD has a contractual treatment allocation with the San Jose/ Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant of 7.85 million gallon per day (mgd), on average. Current wastewater flow to San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant is 5.3 mgd. The CSD prepared a flow capacity analysis in 2008 and determined that 0.6 mgd capacity remained for development beyond that previously allocated and planned for under the General Plan. The 2014 General Plan Amendment and Housing Element EIR identifies this as a significant and unavoidable impact, as the combined 2014 project would generate an estimated 1.45 mgd of wastewater flows upon buildout, resulting in a deficit of 0.85 mgd beyond the current contractually available treatment capacity. However, both the SJ/SCWPCP and City of Sunnyvale treatment plants have excess capacity that could potentially treat new wastewater flows associated with development pursuant to Housing Element policy. With regard to sewer capacity, some capacity deficiencies exist in certain areas of Cupertino, including sewer lines serving the City Center area and lines on Stelling Road and Foothill Boulevard. To accommodate wastewater from major new developments, the lines running at or new capacity in these areas will have to be upgraded. Under current practice, the CSD requires developers of substantial projects to demonstrate that adequate capacity exists, or to identify and fund the necessary mitigations. CSD is, as of 2014, performing a capacity analysis of their entire collection system. Improvements required to mitigate system deficiencies as well as to accommodate future development will be identified and added to their Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Capacity fees will then be developed to fund the CIP. New development that increases wastewater transmission and treatment demand would be required to contribute towards system capacity enhancement improvements through payment of the capacity fee. In this manner, CSD would be responsible for upgrading their system rather than placing the responsibility on the developers of the largest wastewater generators, as is currently the case. If and when this fee is developed and implemented, it will create a more reliable and equitable mitigation for new development. STORM DRAINAGE Cupertino’s storm drain system consists of underground pipelines that carry surface runoff from streets to prevent flooding. Runoff enters the system at B-93 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) catch basins found along curbs near street intersections and is discharged into City creeks. The capacity of the storm drain facilities within Cupertino was evaluated and documented in the 1993 Storm Drain Master Plan, which identifies the areas within the system that do not have the capacity to handle runoff during the 10-year storm event, which is the City’s design standard. The City requires that all new developments conform to this standard. OPEN SPACE Cupertino’s General Plan outlines a policy of having parkland equal to three acres for every 1,000 residents. Currently, Cupertino has approximately 162 acres of parkland. Future development in Cupertino would increase the need for new park land. The General Plan identified an additional 49 acres of potential neighborhood and community parks, which would be more than enough to maintain the standard of three acres for every 1,000 residents. In addition, Cupertino’s park impact fees of $8,100 to $15,750 per unit would generate funding for the City to purchase new parkland and maintain existing recreational resources. COMMUNITY ACCEPTANCE Other constraints to housing production in the City include community acceptance, specifically concerns about impacts on the school districts, traffic, and parks. In particular, neighbors have indicated resistance to the development of buildings taller than two stories. Density and height are more acceptable if buildings are well designed and along corridors or adjacent to higher-density development. In 2013 interviews, many stakeholders indicated that multi-family projects tend to generate community opposition and that there is some general fear of growth and increased density in the City. Opposition from the community tends to increase with the size and height of the project, as well as the proximity to existing single-family neighborhoods. To facilitate residential development and meet the RHNA for this fifth cycle update, the City conducted an extensive community outreach process to identify appropriate and feasible sites for residential and mixed use development over the next eight years. One of the objectives of this process is to address community concerns. SCHOOLS Cupertino Union School District (CUSD) and Fremont Union High School District B-94 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-95 (FUHSD) are among the best in the state. In addition, a portion of the City, in the northeast corner, is also served by the Santa Clara Unified School District. Residents are particularly concerned about the impacts of new housing on schools. However, State law (Government Code Section 65995[3][h]) provides that payment of school impact fees fully mitigates impacts, and as such, the City’s ability to require additional mitigation is limited by State law. CUSD is a rapidly growing school district. Enrollment has increased every year during the last decade, increasing from 15,575 in the fall of 2001 to 19,058 in the fall of 2013. CUSD serves students from Cupertino and parts of San Jose, Sunnyvale, Saratoga, Santa Clara, and Los Altos at 20 elementary schools and five middle schools. Approximately 44 percent of CUSD’s students reside in Cupertino. In total, 3,325 CUSD students (17 percent of total enrollment) attend schools other than the school of their attendance area. FUHSD served 10,657 students from Cupertino, most of Sunnyvale and parts of San Jose, Los Altos, Saratoga, and Santa Clara. The Santa Clara District is a medium size district; as a unified district its 15,394 students are spread from kindergarten through high school. OPERATING COSTS AND FINANCES Most of CUSD revenues are tied to the size of enrollment. The State Department of Education guarantees CUSD a certain level of operations funding known as the “revenue limit.” The Revenue Limit is established annually by the State based on the District’s average daily attendance (ADA). The revenue limit is composed of State funding and local property tax revenues. If the District’s property tax revenue falls below the revenue limit in any given year, the state will increase its contribution to make up the difference. CUSD therefore relies on gradual, steady increases in enrollment to maintain its financial health over time. Because the revenue limit makes up the majority of CUSD revenues, and this limit is tied directly to enrollment, the District needs predictable, ongoing student growth to keep up with costs. Declines in enrollment would require the District to cut costs. The 2013-2014 school year operating budget was $155.6 million. With the total of 19,053 enrolled students districtwide, the operating cost per student for the school year was approximately $8,167. In contrast, FUHSD relies on property taxes for most of its revenue. FUHSD receives property taxes in excess of its revenue limit. FUHSD keeps these APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) additional revenues for operations. As a result, the state does not provide annual per-ADA funding. Therefore, FUHSD counts on a growing property tax base to keep up with costs and maintain per-student funding. New development helps promote a healthy tax base over time. Multi-family development can be particularly beneficial to the tax base, generating higher revenues per acre than single-family homes. This translates into more revenue for FUHSD. The FUHSD’s operating budget for the school year 2013-2014 was $115 million. With the total of 10,657 students enrolled, operating cost per student was approximately $10,800. Moreover, property taxes from new multi-family housing can exceed the cost to FUHSD to serve students. Table 4.8 illustrates this point, using previously built projects as examples. Nonetheless, FUHSD stresses that the impacts of new residential development should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to mitigate any undue effects on the District. ENROLLMENT AND FACILITIES Each of the local school districts expects to continue growing over the next 10 years. CUSD and FUSD project that a total of 1,321 new housing units would be built in Cupertino in the years 2014 through 2023, and expects enrollment to grow accordingly. It is important to note that this growth comes from the other cities that the districts serve, in addition to Cupertino. Cupertino-based students comprise about 60 percent of enrollment in each district. In addition to this housing growth, the recent surge in enrollment at CUSD has been primarily in the younger grades and these larger classes are now entering middle school. Accordingly, by 2020 high school enrollment at FUSD is projected to increase by over 1,000 students. SCUSD anticipates a 13 percent increase in enrollment by 2023. The districts will continue to use their facilities efficiently to accommodate projected growth. CUSD and FUHSD report that their ability to absorb new students is not unlimited, and rapid growth does pose a challenge. However, B-96 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 4.7: Comparison of FUHSD Property Tax Revenue per Acre Multi-family Housing Single-family housing Value per Unit (a) $822,500 $1,550,000 Density (Units/Acre)20 5 Total Value/Acre $16,450,000 $7,750,000 Property Taxes to FUHSD per Acre (b)$27,965 $13,175 Notes: (a) Median sales prices from July 2013 to June 2014 (b) FUHSD receives approximately 17% of 1% of assessed value. Source: School House Services, 2014. B-97 Table 4.8: Financial Impacts of Cupertino Developments on Fremont Union High School District Montebello City Center Travigne Metropolitan Civic Park FUHSD REVENUE Assessed Value of Dev’t $ 113,486,674 $ 38,480,698 $ 25,106,837 $ 65,788,586 $ 116,329,797 Property Tax Revenue (a)$ 252,958 $ 85,745 $ 57,086 $ 145,477 $ 258,480 FUHSD COSTS Number of Students in Dev’t 7 17 2 6 13 Cost to Serve Students (b)$ 75,600 $ 183,600 $ 21,600 $ 64,800 $ 140,400 NET SURPLUS/(DEFICIT)$ 177,358 ($ 97,855)$ 34,486 $ 80,677 $ 118,080 Notes: (a) Percentage of base 1.0 percent property tax FUHSD receives (after ERAF shift) in TRA 13-003: 17% (b) FUHSD Operating Cost per Student, FY 13-14: $10,800 Sources: Santa Clara County Assessor, Enrolment Projections Consultants, School House Services, 2014. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) they will strive to make space and maintain student-teacher ratios through creative solutions such as relocating special programs, adjusting schedules, selectively using modular classrooms, and other approaches. In addition, FUHSD is developing a plan to dedicate the $198 million raised from Measure B (authorized in 2008) for facility improvements. These include athletic facilities, solar power, IT systems, infrastructure, classrooms, labs, and lecture halls. The districts also augment their facilities using impact fees from new development. CUSD receives $2.02 per square foot in fees from residential development. FUHSD receives $1.34 per square foot from new residential development. In addition to the development impact fee, voters have approved multiple bond measures for school facility improvements. The districts can also address impacts on a case-by-case basis, establishing partnerships with home builders to construct new facilities or expand existing schools. Higher-density housing generally generates fewer students per unit. Table 4.9 illustrates this trend among recently-built projects in Cupertino. On average, the school districts report that new single-family homes and townhouses generate 0.8 K-12 students per unit, while new multi-family homes generate 0.3 K-12 students per unit. In addition, most enrollment growth comes from existing homes that are either sold or rented to families with children, not new development. Nonetheless, the districts indicate that new housing will contribute to future demand for classroom space, which the districts must address through the strategies outlined above. A comprehensive analysis of school impacts was completed as part of the 2014 General Plan Amendment and 2015-2023 Housing Element drafting. Four alternatives were analyzed, consistent with the Environmental Impact Report for the combined project. The existing General Plan and Alternative A would result in the same level of residential development. Alternatives B and C change the General Plan designation and zoning for some sites to make more units possible. The analysis presented here pertains to the portion of residential development estimated to take place between 2015 and 2023 under each growth scenario, to be consistent with the Housing Element time period. The projections in Table 4.10 are based on the rates of generation of apartments built since 1995 in Cupertino, which have a relatively small number of middle and high school students in them. The largest numbers of potential units and B-98 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) students are in the Garden Gate and Collins Elementary school attendance areas, in the Lawson Middle School area, and in the Cupertino and Monta Vista High School areas. Collins and Garden Gate Elementary Schools and Cupertino High are, or will be, among the schools with the greatest enrollment stress. The projected student enrollment from new units is a small fraction of the projected student enrollment from the existing units in the City. Capital costs to add capacity related to rising enrollment are significant, and development impact fees from residential development only cover a quarter of this cost. Table 4.11 indicates the estimated cost deficits related to needed capital improvements associated with increases in enrollment. This analysis does not include impact fee revenue from non-residential development; as such, cost deficits may be somewhat overstated. 4.4. OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENERGY CONSERVATION Maximizing energy efficiency and incorporating energy conservation and green building features can contribute to reduced housing costs for homeowners and renters. In addition, these efforts promote sustainable community design and reduced dependence on vehicles, and can significantly contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to compliance with state regulations, the Environmental Resources and Sustainability, Land Use, and Circulation Elements of the Cupertino General Plan includes policies related to energy conservation B-99 Table 4.9: Student Generation in Cupertino Developments Higher Density Lower Density Montebello Travigne Metropolitan Civic Park Density (Units/Acre)96 24 30 31 Students/Unit CUSD (a)0.22 0.26 0.29 0.33 FHUSD (a)0.03 0.04 0.06 0.10 Total 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.43 Notes: (a) Student enrollment data as of October 2013, provided by Enrolment Projection Consultants. Sources: City of Cupertino; EPC 2014. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-100 Table 4.11: Estimated Capital Facilities Net Impacts (in $ Millions) Existing Conditions Minimal Growth A Moderate Growth B Most Growth C By 2023 CUSD Net Capital Facilities Cost Deficit $8.76 $8.76 $8.13 $15.31 FUHSD Net Capital Facilities Cost Deficit $4.02 $4.02 $3.71 $7.03 * SCUSD receives large capital facilities and operating revenue benefits if development is significant. Table 4.10: Estimated Student Enrollment from New Units, 2015-2023 Existing Conditions Minimal Growth A Moderate Growth B Most Growth C By 2023 Number of Units Expected 1,140 1,140 1,060 1,993 CUSD Students Expected 365 365 339 638 FUHSD Students Expected 80 80 74 140 Total Students*445 445 413 778 * SCUSD enrollment impacts are relatively small, possibly either positive or negative. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) and efficiency. In particular, the Land Use Element provides for higher-density housing in proximity to employment centers and transportation corridors and includes mixed use development where appropriate. In addition, the City is undertaking an effort to prepare a Climate Action Plan (CAP) by modifying the Regional Climate Action Plan to suit the City’s needs in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The CAP will meet the regulatory requirements of the California Global Warming Solutions Act, commonly known as AB 32. The Plan will include community-vetted measures to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the region and locally to foster a healthy and resilient Cupertino. Through extensive research and community input, the CAP will meet statewide emission mitigation targets and identify opportunities to reduce emissions that impact the local environment. The City adopted a Green Building Ordinance in 2012. The ordinance aligns with the California Green Building Standards Code (CALGreen) which sets 19,346 11,654 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 CUSD FUSD B-101 ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS, 2008-2013, CUSD AND FUHSD FIGURE B-6 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) the threshold of building codes at a higher level by requiring development projects to incorporate green building practices. Cal Green requires every new building built after January 1, 2011 to meet a certain baseline of efficiency and sustainability standards. The ordinance aims to promote green practices (e.g., water, energy and resource conservation) through the design, construction and maintenance of new buildings and existing buildings undergoing major renovations. The City’s Green Building Ordinance applies to all new residential and non-residential buildings and structures, additions, renovations, and tenant improvements where CalGreen and minimum green building measures are applicable. For residential development the ordinance differentiates between smaller projects of nine or less units and large projects with more than nine units. The Ordinance requires larger development projects to earn certification per the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) or Green Point Rating (GPR) standards. Smaller developments must meet Cal Green’s minimum thresholds as established by the state. Utility providers serving Cupertino also encourage energy and water conservation. The Santa Clara Valley Water District offers rebate programs that can help residents and businesses save both water and energy. Examples include rebates for high-efficiency toilets and clothes waters, converting high- water using landscape to low water using landscape, and connecting a clothes washer to a graywater irrigation system. Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) offers energy efficiency rebates to property owners and managers of multifamily dwellings that contain two or more units. The program encourages owners of existing properties to upgrade to qualifying energy-efficient products in individual tenant units and in the common areas of residential apartment buildings, mobile home parks and condominium complexes. The Housing Element contains policies and strategies to promote energy conservation. For example, the City will evaluate the potential to provide incentives, such as waiving or reducing fees, for energy conservation improvements at affordable housing projects (including both existing and new developments that have fewer than ten units) to exceed the minimum requirements of the California Green Building Code. B-102 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-103 4.5. SUMMARY • Cupertino’s General Plan and Zoning Ordinance are not development constraints to new housing production. The Land Use/Community Design Element of the General Plan identifies four categories of residential use and four mixed use categories, while the Zoning Ordinance permits residential development in seven districts, plus planned development districts. • The Zoning Ordinance allows rotating and permanent homeless shelters in the BQ Zone in compliance with State law. • The Zoning Ordinance permits employee housing for workers and their families in residentially zoned districts. • Site improvement, building code requirements, and permit processing time in Cupertino are comparable to surrounding communities and are not a development constraint. • Development fees in Cupertino are comparable to those in neighboring jurisdictions. • The lack of state and local funding sources for affordable housing and limited access to financing, in conjunction with the high cost and low supply of land, may constrain housing development in the near term. • A potential constraint to housing development is road capacity. Residential projects may be required to undertake mitigation measures if developments result in traffic impacts. • The stormwater drainage, water distribution, and water supply systems are adequate to accommodate anticipated growth in Cupertino and are not considered constraints to development. Wastewater treatment is reaching capacity in the area; however, existing plants have some excess capacity to treat new wastewater flows associated with development pursuant to Housing Element policy. Some sewer line capacity deficiencies also exist in certain areas of Cupertino—the Cupertino Sanitary District is in the process of assessing deficiencies and developing capacity fees intended to fund necessary improvements. • Capacity and fiscal impacts to the Cupertino Union School District, Fremont Union High School District and the Santa Clara Unified School District must APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. State law provides that payment of school impact fees fully mitigates impacts, and as such, the City’s ability to require additional mitigation is limited by State law. • Community acceptance may serve as a constraint to housing development. Over the past several years, multi-family projects have been successfully opposed by residents. 5. HOUSING RESOURCES 5.1. OVERVIEW OF AVAILABLE SITES FOR HOUSING The purpose of the adequate sites analysis is to demonstrate that the City of Cupertino has a sufficient supply of land to accommodate its fair share of the region’s housing needs during the RHNA projections period (January 1, 2014 – October 31, 2022). The Government Code requires that the Housing Element include an “inventory of land suitable for residential development, including vacant sites and sites having the potential for redevelopment” (Section 65583(a) (3)). It further requires that the element analyze zoning and infrastructure on these sites to ensure housing development is feasible during the planning period. Demonstrating an adequate land supply, however, is only part of the task. The City must also show that this supply is capable of accommodating housing demand from all economic segments of the community. High land costs in the Bay Area make it difficult to meet the demand for affordable housing on sites that are zoned at relatively low densities. Pursuant to Government Code Section 65583.2(c)(3)(B), local governments may utilize “default” density standards (e.g. the “Mullen Densities”) to provide evidence that “appropriate zoning” is in place to accommodate the development of housing for very-low and low- income households . The purpose of this law is to provide a numerical density standard for local governments, resulting in greater certainty in the housing element review process. Specifically, if a local government has adopted density standards that comply with the criteria provided in the law, no further analysis is required to establish the adequacy of the density standard. The default density standard for Cupertino and other suburban jurisdictions in Santa Clara County to demonstrate adequate capacity for low and very low income units is 20 dwelling units per acre or more. B-104 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-105 5.2. PROGRESS TOWARDS THE REGIONAL HOUSING NEEDS ALLOCATION (RHNA) California General Plan law requires each city and county to have land zoned to accommodate its fair share of the regional housing need. Pursuant to California Government Code Section 65584, the state, regional councils of government (in this case, ABAG) and local governments must collectively determine each locality’s share of regional housing need. The major goal of the RHNA is to ensure a fair distribution of housing among cities and counties in the State so that every community provides for a mix of housing for all economic segments. The housing allocation targets are not building requirements; rather, they are planning goals for each community to accommodate through appropriate planning policies and land use regulations. Allocation targets are intended to ensure that adequate sites and zoning are made available to address anticipated housing demand during the planning period. The RHNA for the ABAG region was adopted in July 2013. This RHNA covers an 8.8-year projection period (January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022)9 and is divided into four income categories: very low, low, moderate, and above moderate. As determined by ABAG, the City of Cupertino’s fair share allocation is 1,064 new housing units during this planning cycle, with the units divided among the four income categories as shown in Table 5.1. Since the RHNA uses January 1, 2014 as the baseline for growth projections for the 2014-2022 projection period, jurisdictions may count toward the RHNA housing units developed, under construction, or approved since January 1, 2014. Between January 1 and May 31, 2014, building permits for 14 single-family housing units and three second units were approved in Cupertino. In addition, six single-family homes and seven apartments received Planning approvals (Table 5.1). Also included in the RHNA credits are 32 second units (also known as accessory dwelling units) projected to be developed within the planning period. As provided in Government Code Section 65583(c)(1), in addition to identifying vacant or underutilized land resources, the City can address a portion of the RHNA through an estimate of the number of second units that may be permitted during the planning period. The City approves an average of four second units per year. Considering this track record, the City estimates that 32 second units will be approved over eight-year planning period. Cupertino’s Zoning Ordinance permits second dwelling units on lots in Single-Family Residential (R-1), Residential 9 The Housing Element planning period differs from the RHNA projection period—the period for which hous- ing demand was calculated. The Housing Element covers the planning period of January 31, 2015 through January 31, 2023. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Hillside (RHS), Agricultural (A), and Agricultural Residential (A-1) Districts. Permit approval and architectural review are done at the ministerial (building permit) level. Consistent with Government Code Section 65583(c)(1) and HCD technical guidance documents, the City is applying the second unit estimate towards its moderate income RHNA. HCD has indicated that second unit affordability can be determined by examining market rates for reasonably comparable rental properties and applying these rates to estimate the anticipated affordability of second units. A review of rental market conditions in Cupertino conducted for this Housing Element found that the average cost of a studio apartment is $1,608 and the average cost of a one-bedroom apartment is $2,237. These rental rates are in the range of moderate income rents as determined by HUD (see Table B-106 Table 5.1: Remaining RHNA, Cupertino, 2014-2022 Units Constructed/Under Construction/Permits Issued Extremely and Very Low Income (0-50% AMI) Low Income (51- 80% AMI) Moderate Income (81-120% AMI) Above Moderate Income (121%+ AMI) Total Various Single-Family Units (Building Permits)---------14 14 Various Single-Family Units (Planning Permits)---------6 6 Multi-Family Units (Planning Permits)---------7 7 Second Units Permitted (Building Permits)------3*---3 Estimated Second Unit Production ------32*---32 Total ------35 27 62 2014-2022 RHNA 356 207 231 270 1,064 RHNA Credits ------35 27 62 Remaining 2014-2022 RHNA 356 207 196 243 1,002 Source: ABAG Regional Housing Needs Allocation, 2014; City of Cupertino, 2014 Notes: *These units do not have affordability restrictions. Market rate rents and sale prices for similar units fall within levels affordable to the households earning moderate incomes (81-120% AMI) and are allocated as such. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-107 2.15: Maximum Affordable Housing Costs, Santa Clara County, 2013). As these units are comparable in size and occupancy to second units, it is reasonable to assume that current rents for second units fall within affordability levels for one-person moderate-income households. Therefore, second units in the pipeline and the anticipated 32 second units are credited against the moderate income RHNA. Furthermore, recent research in the San Francisco Bay Area has found that a sizable fraction of secondary units are rented to acquaintances, friends or family, in some cases for free and in other cases, for reduced rents.10 This research suggests that second units may in fact be a source of affordable housing in the City at affordability levels lower than the moderate-income level they are credited against. Applying the projected 32 second units toward the moderate income category is a conservative approach, and is consistent with State law and HCD technical guidance documents. With these credits, the City has a remaining RHNA of 1,002 units: 356 extremely low/very low-income units, 207 low-income units, 196 moderate-income units, and 243 above moderate-income units.5.3. Residential Capacity Analysis 5.3. RESIDENTIAL CAPACITY ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY Like many cities in the Bay Area, Cupertino is largely built out. As a result, opportunities for residential units will be realized through the redevelopment of sites with existing buildings. City staff undertook a deliberate site selection process to ensure that future residential development on the sites would: 1) have community support (see description of community process below), 2) achieve community goals of affordability and walkability, and 3) create a livable environment for new residents and neighbors. To ensure this, sites were selected based on the following criteria: • Proximity to transportation corridors • Proximity (preferably within walking distance) to amenities such as schools, neighborhood services, restaurants and retail • Ability to provide smaller, more affordable units; sites were selected in higher density areas to achieve this • Create a livable community with the least impact on neighborhoods; sites that had the most in common with successfully developed sites were selected 10 Chapple, Karen and Jake Wegmann. Understanding the Market for Secondary Units in the East Bay. UC Berkeley: Institute of Urban and Regional Developmental. Oct 2012. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) • Corner lot location; such parcels provide the most flexibility to accommodate mixed-use developments and avoid impeding parking and connectivity between mid-block parcels In addition to the state-wide criteria that HCD uses to determine site suitability, the Sustainable Communities Strategy/One Bay Area Plan contributed additional criteria regarding what makes a desirable housing site in the ABAG region. The One Bay Area Plan is a long-range integrated transportation and land-use/ housing strategy through 2040 for the San Francisco Bay Area. The plan focuses development in Priority Development Areas (PDAs) which are locally designated areas within existing communities that have been identified and approved by local cities or counties for future growth. These areas are typically accessible to public transit, jobs, recreation, shopping and other services, and absorb much of the growth anticipated in the region. In Cupertino, a PDA is located along Stevens Creek Boulevard between Highway 85 and the City of Santa Clara and along De Anza Boulevard between Stevens Creek Boulevard and Highway 280. Key criteria in the Sustainable Communities Strategy/One Bay Area Plan include: • Location along major transportation routes with access to transit or within ½ mile of a Valley Transit Authority-designate PDA • Proximity to employment and activity centers • Proximity to amenities With the selection criteria in mind, City staff conducted a thorough study evaluating underutilized land in Cupertino. These parcels included residentially zoned land as well as other designations such as commercial and mixed use. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT To ensure that both community members and property owners support of the Housing Element—and sites inventory in particular—City staff engaged in an in- depth community involvement process. The inventory of residential opportunity sites was developed in consultation with the Housing Commission, Planning Commission, City Council, and members of the public. The Housing Element and sites inventory were discussed at 12 workshops, study sessions, and hearings in 2014. At each meeting, commissioners and council members, as well as members of the public, discussed the inventory. During these discussions, B-108 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-109 several sites were removed and new sites were added based on input from these various stakeholders. Decisions to add or remove sites were based on realistic expectations for sites to be redeveloped within the planning period. In addition to consultation with various community stakeholders, City staff reached out to individual owners whose properties were identified as housing opportunity sites. Each affected owner received a letter informing them that their property had been identified by the City to be included in its Housing Element as a housing opportunity site. The letter provided information about the process and the opportunity to provide feedback or express concerns. The sites with property owner development interest were evaluated against the criteria described above. Sites that did not meet the criteria were not included in the inventory. Sites where the owner objected to inclusion were not included in the final inventory. While residential development may occur on other sites not included in this inventory, the sites ultimately included in this Housing Element are those the City believes have the most realistic chance of redeveloping into housing within the planning period. As a result of the community engagement process, the sites inventory represents a list of residential opportunity sites that the community has thoroughly reviewed. DETERMINATION OF REALISTIC CAPACITY Sites inventory capacity must account for development standards such as building height restrictions, minimum setbacks, and maximum lot coverage, as well as the potential for non-residential uses in mixed-use areas. A survey of recent developments (Table 5.2) indicates that recent multi-family residential projects have built to between 82 percent and 99.5 percent of the maximum allowable density. To ensure that the sites inventory provides a “realistic capacity” for each site, estimates for maximum developable units on each site are conservatively reduced by 15 percent. Because of the desirability and high value of residential property in Cupertino, developers are reluctant to include ground floor commercial space in residential buildings, even when land is zoned for mixed-use development. The City must often encourage or request that ground-floor commercial space be included in APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) projects and commercial space typically represents a small proportion of the total development. Staff anticipates that this trend will continue, and land zoned for mixed-use will achieve residential densities at or above 85 percent of the maximum with ground floor commercial space along the street frontage. This trend is evident in the three mixed-use project examples that contained ground floor commercial development. The Biltmore Adjacency, Metropolitan and Adobe Terraces projects are typical mixed-use, multi-family developments in Cupertino. In these cases, the commercial component represented a small portion of the total square footage (between 2 and 8 percent). Even with the provision of ground floor commercial space, these developments were able to achieve 91 to 92 percent of the maximum allowable residential units. The height limit of developments in most of the major transportation corridors is 45 feet at the minimum. Based on the development experiences at the completed projects described above, the density assumptions for mixed-use residential projects at 85 percent of the maximum allowed is realistic. The assumption that sites will achieve 85 percent of the maximum allowable density is also realistic for sites that allow for a variety of uses, including 100 percent commercial development, in addition to residential development and mixed-use development. This is because of the high market value of available Table 5.2 Mixed Use/Multi Family Residential Project Examples Project Name:Rose Bowl Mixed Use Biltmore Adjacency Oak Park Adobe Terrace Metropolitan Site Area (acres)5.9 3.24 1.6 1.0 3.3 Max. Density (dwelling units per acre)35 25 35 25 35 Max. Developable Units 205 81 56 25 116 Actual Units Developed 204 74 46 23 107 Actual/Max. Units 99.5%91.3%82%92%92% Commercial Sq. Ft. as % of Total Sq. ft.37%2%NA 8%4% Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 B-110 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-111 properties for residential development. As discussed above, the desirability and high value of residential property in Cupertino encourages residential or mixed-use development over exclusively commercial development. All five example projects presented in Table 5.2 were developed in a zone that allows a mix of uses including exclusively commercial and office development, further demonstrating the strength of residential development over commercial development in Cupertino. 5.4. RESIDENTIAL SITES INVENTORY - SCENARIO A Cupertino has residential development opportunities with sufficient capacity to meet and exceed the identified housing need (Figure B-7). The opportunities shown in the sites inventory consist predominantly of underutilized sites that can accommodate 1,400 residential units on properties zoned for densities of 20 dwelling units to the acre or more. The sites inventory is organized by geographic area and in particular, by mixed use corridors. As shown, sites identified to meet the near-term development potential lie within the North Vallco Park Special Area, the Vallco Shopping District Special Area, and the Heart of the City Special Area. As indicated in a market study completed in 2014, there is a healthy demand for new housing and long-term trends indicate market potential for additional development in key areas throughout the city. The 2014 market study further found that existing demand is greatest for smaller, more affordable units adjacent to services, retail, and entertainment options. All sites in the Housing Element to meet the RHNA are identified on major mixed-use corridors, close to services and major employers. As demonstrated previously, City leaders have a strong record of supporting and facilitating the development of residential projects in mixed-use areas and of APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) intensifying residential uses where appropriate within the context of the general plan land use allocations. Regulatory standards, including the revised Density Bonus Ordinance, are intended to encourage additional residential development on these sites. Altogether, the five sites ensure that adequate sites beyond the remaining RHNA are provided for in the planning period. A parcel-specific listing of sites is included in Table 7.3: Residential Sites Inventory to Meet the 2014 RHNA. Four of the sites in the Residential Sites inventory may be developed without a Conditional Use Permit with the number of units identified in this Housing Element. The City has identified one key opportunity site that will involve substantial coordination for redevelopment (Vallco Shopping District, Site A2). Due to the magnitude of the project, the City has established a contingency plan to meet the RHNA if a Specific Plan is not adopted within three years of Housing Element adoption. This contingency plan, called Scenario B, is discussed later in this document (see Section 5.5 Residential Sites Inventory - Scenario B). NORTH VALLCO PARK SPECIAL AREA The North Vallco Park Special Area encompasses 240 acres and is an important employment center for Cupertino and the region. The area is located in the northeastern corner of the City, bounded by Homestead Road to the north and Interstate 280 to the south. The area is defined by Apple Campus 2 and the North Vallco Gateway. The North Vallco Gateway includes a medium to high-density multi-family residential project east of Wolfe Road, two hotels and the Cupertino Village Shopping Center west of Wolfe Road. The North Vallco Park area is envisioned to become a sustainable office and campus environment surrounded by a mix of connected, high-quality and pedestrian-oriented neighborhood center, hotel and residential uses. The Apple 2 Campus is expected to be a significant catalyst for residential development in this vicinity. The area accordingly presents a prime opportunity for redevelopment. SITE A1 (THE HAMPTONS) Site A1 is located at the southeast corner of the intersection of Pruneridge Avenue and North Wolfe Road, adjacent to the recently approved Apple Campus B-112 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-113 North Vallco Park: 600 Units Heart of the City: 411 Units Vallco Shopping District: 389 Units FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos A3: Oaks 200 units A5: Vacant 11 units A1: Hamptons 600 units A2: Vallco 389 units A4: Marina 200 units 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Special Areas Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas North Vallco Park Heart of the City Housing Elements Sites VTA Priority Development Area (PDA) Site units Site Number: Realistic Capacity. Note: Realistic capacity is generally 85% of maximum capacity allowed Vallco Shopping District Priority Housing Element Sites: Scenario A Applicable if Vallco Specific Plan is adopted by May 31, 2018 If Vallco Specific Plan is not adopted by May 31, 2018, the designated Priority Housing Element Sites will be as shown in General Plan Appendix B, Section 5.5: Residential Sites Inventory - Scenario B. LU-1 PRIORITY HOUSING ELEMENT SITES SCENARIO A FIGURE B-7 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) 2. The site is comprised of two parcels totaling 12.44 acres and is currently occupied with a 342-unit multi-family housing development and surface parking lots. The site’s property owners have expressed interest in redeveloping the site with significantly higher residential densities than what exists today. Such a redevelopment will create an opportunity to reduce vehicle trips for employees living within walking and bicycling distance to this regional employment hub. The property owner has publically voiced interest in redevelopment of the property to provide additional residential units, and has issued a letter indicating this intent to the City. The site has a land use designation of High Density (greater than 35 du/ac), zoned Planned Development (P [Res]), and allows for a maximum density of 85 units per acre. The City has approved increased heights to facilitate development of the Hamptons property at the densities identified. Assuming realistic capacity of 85 percent of maximum density is achieved, Site A1 has the potential to yield 600 net units, for a total of 942 units on site. The B-114 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Site A1: The Hamptons B-115 close proximity to major transportation routes (freeway) and adjacency to a major new employment center (Apple Campus 2), coupled with the high demand for multi-family residential units in Cupertino, make this site ideal for intensification. VALLCO SHOPPING DISTRICT SPECIAL AREA The Vallco Shopping District is centrally located in the City. The property was originally developed as an indoor mall in the 1970s for retail uses, anchored by Macy’s, Sears, JC Penny, and AMC Theaters. The property has been remodeled several times since it was built. Despite being the largest retail project in the City, the Mall is largely vacant, save for the anchor tenants. According to stakeholders interviewed for a retail strategy report completed in 2014, Vallco represents not only one of the best-located properties in the City, but also one of the City’s largest redevelopment opportunities. SITE A2 (VALLCO SHOPPING DISTRICT) The Vallco Shopping District is physically divided by North Wolfe Road, but connected via an elevated bridge. Up until 2014, the approximately 58.7-acre site was divided between five property owners on 14 parcels, representing a combination of investors and anchor tenants. In 2014, all parcels of the property were purchased by a single developer who intends to pursue a Specific Plan and redevelopment of the site. The 2014 retail strategy report noted that there is an oversupply of mall space in the United States, which is affecting Vallco’s performance. The Mall operates APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) in a competitive environment with successful projects to the north (Stanford Shopping Center), east (Valley Fair and Santana Row), and south (Westgate Shopping Center). In addition, the nearby Main Street mixed-use development will add an additional 125,000 square feet of retail, further contributing to the market feasibility of alternate (residential) uses on this site. To revitalize this area, the City envisions a complete redevelopment of the existing Vallco Fashion Mall into a vibrant mixed-use “town center” that is a focal point for regional visitors and the community. The site has a high potential for redevelopment due to expressed property owner interest to redevelop, high retail vacancy rates, close proximity to major transportation routes (freeway), and the potential to provide a considerable number of units at the site. The high potential development capacity and close proximity to two recently constructed mixed-use projects (Rosebowl and Main Street) further support redevelopment of the Vallco Shopping District and the inclusion of this site in the Housing Element. The site is designated Regional Shopping/Office/Residential in the General Plan and zoned Planned Development with Regional Shopping and Commercial (P[Regional Shopping and P[CG]). Strategy HE-1.3.1 provides that the City will adopt a Specific Plan for the Vallco site by May 31, 2018 that would permit 389 units by right at a minimum density of 20 units per acre. The zoning for the site would be modified as part of the Specific Plan process to allow residential uses as part of a mixed-use development at a maximum density of 35 units per acre. If the Specific Plan is not adopted, the City will schedule hearings consistent with Government Code Section 65863 to consider removing Vallco Shopping District as a Priority Housing Site and replacing it with the sites shown in Scenario B. HEART OF THE CITY SPECIAL AREA The Heart of the City Special Area is a key mixed-use, commercial corridor in Cupertino. Development within this Special Area is guided by the Heart of the City Specific Plan, which is intended to create a greater sense of place, community identity, and a positive and memorable experience for residents, workers and visitors in Cupertino. The area encompasses approximately 635 acres along Stevens Creek Boulevard between Highway 85 and the eastern city limit. The Stevens Creek Boulevard corridor functions as Cupertino’s main mixed-use, commercial and retail corridor. B-116 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Site A2: Vallco Shopping District B-117 A majority of the Heart of the City Special Area is located within a Priority Development Area (PDA). PDAs are the result of a regional initiative that identifies areas where new development will support the day-to-day needs of residents and workers in a pedestrian-friendly environment served by transit. PDAs are critical components for implementing the region’s proposed long term growth strategy. The level of growth in each PDA reflects its role in achieving regional objectives and how it fits into locally designated priority growth plans. Cupertino’s PDA area, shown on Figure B-7, includes properties within a quarter mile of Stevens Creek Boulevard from Highway 85 to the City’s eastern border and a portion of North and South De Anza Boulevards. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) To meet the RHNA, three sites encompassing over 15 acres have been identified within the Heart of the City Special Area boundaries; these sites can accommodate 411 units at densities greater than 20 units per acre. Two sites are underutilized infill properties, one site is vacant. For underutilized parcels, the age of onsite buildings and the parcels’ improvement-to-land value (I/L) ratio suggest that these sites are prime opportunities for redevelopment. In addition, the redevelopment capacity of identified sites is predicated on interest articulated by property owners and recent development approvals in the area, including the Metropolitan (107 units), Adobe Terrace (23 units), Main Street (120 units), and Rose Bowl (204 units) mixed-use projects. SITE A3 (THE OAKS SHOPPING CENTER) Site A3 is located on the north side of Stevens Creek Blvd between Highway 85 and Mary Avenue in the Oaks Gateway within the Heart of the City Special Area. The site is comprised of four parcels (with two owner entities that function under the same ownership) totaling 7.9 acres. The site is occupied by the Oaks Shopping Center, which is comprised of various small-scale commercial and restaurant tenants. Although the Center is in relatively good condition, it was originally constructed in 1976 as a single story structure with ample surface parking, and has a resulting low floor-area ratio. The I/L ratio for the consolidated property is estimated at 0.31. The property owners are very interested in redevelopment of the site with a mixed-use (residential and commercial) product, and have issued a letter indicating this intent to the City. The zoning for this property allows residential in addition to commercial uses. The site presents a strong potential for a redevelopment project that includes residential units based on its large size, potential residential capacity, adjacent freeway access, and location adjacent to residential development. A retail strategy report completed for Cupertino in 2014 identifies the Oaks as a site well positioned for redevelopment, perhaps as a retail-residential mixed-use project. Its location on Stevens Creek Boulevard adjacent to Highway 85 and in the Heart of the City District makes high-density multi-family residential development feasible at this site. Several relatively high-density mixed-use, residential projects are in close proximity on Stevens Creek Boulevard. Site A3 is located within a Priority Development Area. The site is designated for Commercial/Residential in the General Plan, zoned Planned Development with General Commercial and Residential (P[CG, Res]), and allows for a maximum density of 30 units per acre. Site A3 has the potential to yield 200 units. B-118 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-119 SITE A4 (MARINA PLAZA) Site A4 is located at the Bandley Drive/Alves Drive intersection near the Stevens Creek Boulevard and North De Anza Boulevard intersection, a major intersection in the North Crossroads Node within the Heart of the City Special Area. The site is comprised of one large (6.86-acre) parcel and is occupied by a single-story commercial strip mall and surface parking lot. The primary shopping center tenant is an ethnic grocery store. The site is considered underutilized given its prime location at a major intersection and along one of the major corridors in Cupertino, in close proximity to services and public transportation and adjacent to existing residential neighborhoods. The location and configuration of the site allow for access from Stevens Creek Boulevard, North De Anza Boulevard, Bandley Drive, and Alves Drive. The property owner has expressed interest in redeveloping the site to include residential uses. The maximum density permitted on this site was increased in 2014 from 25 to 35 units per acre to facilitate this type of redevelopment. Site A4 is designated as Commercial/Office/Residential (C/O/R), zoned as Planned Development with General Commercial and Residential (P[CG, Res]), and allows for a maximum density of 35 units per acre. Site A4 has the potential to yield 200 units. Site A3: The Oaks Shopping Center APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) SITE A5 (BARRY SWENSON) Site A5 is a vacant 0.55-acre property located along the south side of Stevens Creek Boulevard, mid-block between Finch Avenue and North Tantau Avenue. The site is located across the street from the 17.4-acre Main Street mixed- use project constructed in 2014. Main Street is a high-intensity development expected to be major community focal point. Although Site A5 is relatively small compared to other sites included in the inventory, its location on Stevens Creek Boulevard and in the Heart of the City Special Area is conducive to relatively dense multi-family residential development. Furthermore, high-density multi- family development has been built on parcels of less than one acre in Cupertino, including the 23-unit Adobe Terrace project. The site is located along one of the major transportation corridors in Cupertino, and in close proximity to services and public transportation in the Heart of the City Special Area. The owner of the property has expressed interest in developing with residential uses, including affordable products. Site A5 is located within a Priority Development Area. Site A5 was included in the 2007 Housing Element. The site is designated in the General Plan for Commercial/Office/Residential and is zoned Planned Development with General Commercial and Residential uses (P[CG, Res]), which allows for a maximum density of 25 units per acre. Site A4 has the potential to yield 11 units. Site A4: Marina Plaza B-120 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-121 ADEQUACY OF SITES FOR RHNA - SCENARIO A The sites inventory under Scenario A identifies capacity for 1,400 units, all of which are on sites suitable for development of affordable housing at densities greater than 20 units per acre. Overall, identified housing sites have the ability to adequately accommodate the remaining RHNA of 1,002 units. Table 5.3 and 5.4 summarize the RHNA status. 5.5. RESIDENTIAL SITES INVENTORY - SCENARIO B As noted above, one particular site identified in Scenario A will involve substantial coordination for redevelopment (Vallco Shopping District, Site A2). Due to the magnitude of the project, the City has established a contingency plan to meet the RHNA if a Specific Plan is not adopted by May 31, 2018. This contingency plan (referred to here as Scenario B and shown on Figure B-8), involves the City removing Vallco Shopping District, adding more priority sites to the inventory, and also increasing the density/allowable units on other priority sites. Four of the sites discussed in Scenario A above are also included in Scenario B, with some modifications to density and realistic capacity on two of these sites. Two additional sites are added to the inventory, one of which was included in the 2007-2014 Housing Element sites inventory. Site A5: Barry Swenson Property APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) SITE B1 (THE HAMPTONS APARTMENTS) Existing conditions, redevelopment potential, and developer interest for the Hamptons Apartments are discussed in detail under Scenario A (Site A1). For Scenario B, if the Vallco Shopping District Specific Plan is not adopted by May 31, 2018, the density for the Hamptons would be increased to 99 units per acre and the associated realistic capacity would result in a net increase of 750 units, for a total of 1,092 units on that site. SITE B2 (THE OAKS SHOPPING CENTER) Information regarding redevelopment potential and existing uses for the Oaks Shopping Center is provided in detail under Scenario A (Site A3). For Scenario B, if the Vallco Shopping District Specific Plan is not adopted by May 31, 2018, the realistic capacity for The Oaks Shopping Center would be increased to 235 units. This would be associated with an increase in density from 30 units per acre to 35 units per acre. SITE B3 (MARINA PLAZA) Marina Plaza is discussed in detail under Scenario A (Site A4). No changes are proposed to this site in Scenario B. SITE B4 (BARRY SWENSON PROPERTY) The vacant property owned by Barry Swenson is discussed in detail under Scenario A (Site A5). No changes are proposed to this site in Scenario B. SITE B5 (GLENBROOK APARTMENTS) Site B5 contains the Glenbrook Apartments that are not built to the maximum allowed density in the Heart of the City Special Area. The apartment complex has large open spaces that exceed open space requirements established in the Zoning Code. As such, additional units could be built on the site without removing existing uses. Spanning 31.3 acres, the site could accommodate 626 units under existing zoning, which allows for a density of 20 dwelling units to the acre. However, the Glenbrook Apartments only contains 517 units, resulting in additional potential for up to 109 residential units. Given the existing uses on the site, realistic capacity was conservatively estimated at 46 percent. Assuming Glenbrook Apartments is able to achieve 54 percent of the site’s remaining capacity, the realistic net yield for Site B5 is 58 new units. A similar type of infill development that involves the expansion of garden apartment complexes has B-122 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-123 North Vallco Park: 750 Units Heart of the City: 504 Units Homestead: 132 Units FOOTHILL BLVDSTELLING RDDe ANZA BLVDHOMESTEAD ROAD WOLFE RDSTEVENS CREEK BLVD BLANEY AVEMILLER AVEBOLLINGER RD McCLELLAN RD BUBB ROADPROSPECT RD 85 280 TANTAU AVE Stevens Creek Reservoir Sunnyvale Santa Clara San Jose Los Altos Priority Housing Element Sites: Scenario B Applicable if Vallco Specific Plan is not adopted by May 31, 2018 B5: Glenbrooks 58 units B2: Oaks 235 units B4: Vacant 11 units B1: Hamptons 750 units B3: Marina 200 units B6: Homestead Lanes 132 units 0 1000 0 500 2000 3000 0 0.5 1 Mile 1000 Feet Meters Special Areas/Neighborhoods Legend City Boundary Urban Service Area Boundary Sphere of Influence Boundary Agreement Line Unincorporated Areas North Vallco Park Heart of the City Housing Elements Sites VTA Priority Development Area (PDA) Site units Site Number: Realistic Capacity. Note: Realistic capacity is generally 85% of maximum capacity Homestead LU-1 PRIORITY HOUSING ELEMENT SITES SCENARIO B FIGURE B-8 Applicable if Vallco Specific Plan is not adopted by May 31, 2018. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-124 Table 5.3: Summary of Priority Housing Sites - Scenario A Site Adopted General Plan/Zoning Max Density (DUA)Acres Realistic Capacity (units)Affordability Level Site A1 (The Hamptons)High Density P(Res)85 12.44 600 Very Low/Low Site A2 (Vallco Shopping District) RS/O/R P(Regional Shopping) & P(CG) (a) 35 58.7 389 Very Low/Low Site A3 (The Oaks Shopping Center) C/R P(CG, Res)30 7.9 200 Very Low/Low Site A4 (Marina Plaza)C/O/R P(CG, Res)35 6.86 200 Very Low/Low Site A5 (Barry Swenson)C/O/R P(CG, Res)25 0.55 11 Very Low/Low Total 86.51 1,400 Notes: (a) Zoning to be determined by Specific Plan to allow residential uses. (b) Realistic capacity for Sites A1, A3, A4 and A5 reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent. Realistic capacity for Site A2 is the amount allocated to the site in the Housing Element; a specific plan will be required for Site A2 prior to any new development. (c) Identified capacity of sites that allow development densities of at least 20 units per acre are credited toward the lower-income RHNA based on State law. Pursuant to Government Code Section 65583.2(c)(3)(B), local governments may utilize “default” density standards to provide evidence that “appropriate zoning” is in place to support the development of housing for very-low and low-income households . The default density standard for Cupertino and other suburban jurisdictions in Santa Clara County is 20 dwelling units per acre (DUA) or more. (d) Residential capacity for Site A1 reflects the net increase in units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 Table 5.4: Comparison of Sites and RHNA - Scenario A Income Category Sites Remaining RHNA Surplus/ Shortfall(+/-) Extremely Low and Very Low 1,400 356 Low --207 Moderate --196 Above Moderate --243 Total 1,400 1,002 +398 Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-125 previously been approved and completed in Cupertino at the Markham (formerly known as Villa Serra) and Biltmore developments. At the Biltmore, carports were demolished and new units constructed above ground-floor parking. New units and additional parking were added to the Markham complex in surplus open space and recreational areas. The Biltmore project added 29 units for a total project size of 179 units, while the Villa Serra development added 117 units to achieve a total of 506 units. In both cases, existing units were not destroyed to accommodate the expansion. Furthermore, in 2013 the Biltmore added six units by demolishing existing carports and has received entitlements to add seven more units above a clubhouse serving the development in an existing open space area in 2014. Similar to the Biltmore Apartments, the Glenbrook Apartments complex has large areas of land dedicated to carports. As was done in the Biltmore development, the carport areas can be converted to ground floor parking with new units above. Additional units could be constructed without affecting existing residential units at the site. This site was recommended by members of the public and the community supports the expansion of the Glenbrook Apartments. The trend of adding new units to existing garden apartment complexes is expected to continue in Cupertino due to the limited supply of vacant land and the high demand for residential units in the city. The financial feasibility of additional units on Site B5 is particularly strong because the property has long-time landowners who purchased the land when prices were much lower. Site B5 was included in the 2007 Housing Element. The site is designated in the General Plan as Medium Density (10 to 20 dwelling units per acre) and zoned Multi-Family Residential (R3), allowing for a maximum density of 20 units per acre. Site B5 has the potential to yield 58 new units. SITE B6 (HOMESTEAD LANES) Site B6 is located in the Stelling Gateway within the Homestead Special Area and bounded by the Markham Apartments to the east, additional apartments and I-280 to the south, and the city boundary with the City of Sunnyvale to the APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) west. The Homestead Special Area includes commercial uses and several low-, medium-, and high-density residential neighborhoods. Site B6 is comprised of four parcels totaling 5.1 acres and is currently occupied by a strip mall commercial center and surface parking. The Homestead Bowl bowling alley is the primary site tenant. Additional site tenants include small-scale restaurants and a nail salon. The northwest corner of the site is occupied by a McDonalds Restaurant. I/L ratios for the parcels (ranging from 0 to 1.29) indicate that, except for the McDonalds Restaurant, the land value far exceeds the value of buildings on the site. Site B6 represents a strong redevelopment opportunity as a mixed-use site based on the I/L ratios, combined with the large size of the site, deferred maintenance on the primary site, the close proximity to a major transportation route (freeway), the low-intensity and marginal nature of most of the current uses, and its corner location. Site B5: Glenbrook Apartments B-126 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Site B6: Homestead Lanes and Adjacency B-127 The site is designated as Commercial/Residential (C/R), zoned Planned Development with General Commercial (P[CG]) and Planned Development with Recreation and Entertainment Uses (P[Rec, Enter]), and has a maximum permitted density of 35 dwelling units per acre. Site B6 has the potential to yield 132 units. ADEQUACY OF SITES FOR RHNA - SCENARIO B The sites inventory under Scenario B identifies capacity for 1,386 units, all of which are on sites suitable for development of affordable housing. Overall, identified housing sites have the ability to adequately accommodate the remaining RHNA of 1,002 units. Table 5.5 and 5.6 summarize the RHNA status for Scenario B. 5.6. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSTRAINTS The sites inventory analysis reflects land use designations and densities established in the General Plan Land Use and Community Design Element. Thus, any environmental constraints that would lower the potential yield have already been accounted for. Sites identified to meet the RHNA are located in urbanized areas on previously developed sites; as such, there are no wetlands or other important biological issues of concern. Any additional constraints that would occur on a more detailed site review basis would be addressed as part of the individual project review process. The APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) capacity to meet the regional share and individual income categories are not constrained by any environmental conditions. 5.7. AVAILABILITY OF SITE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES Site development potential indicated in the sites inventory is consistent with (and in most cases lower than) the development capacity reported in the Land Use and Community Design Element. Full urban-level services are available throughout the city and specifically to each site in the inventory. Such services are more than adequate for the potential unit yield on each site. As indicated in the EIR for the General Plan Amendment and the Housing Element, there are sufficient water supplies available to serve the sites identified to meet the RHNA. With regard to sewer capacity, some capacity deficiencies exist in certain areas of Cupertino, including sewer lines serving the City Center area and lines on Stelling Road and Foothill Boulevard. As a result, the Cupertino Sanitary District requires developers of substantial projects to demonstrate that adequate capacity exists, or to identify the necessary mitigations. Development within these areas is reviewed on a case-by-case basis to ensure that adequate sewer capacity exists. 5.8. ZONING FOR EMERGENCY SHELTERS AND TRANSITIONAL AND SUPPORTIVE HOUSING To facilitate the development of emergency housing and comply with State law, the City amended the Zoning Code in 2010 to address emergency shelters and transitional and supportive housing. EMERGENCY SHELTERS An emergency shelter is a facility that provides temporary housing with minimal supportive services and is limited to occupancy of six months or less. State law requires Cupertino to permit emergency shelters without discretionary approvals in at least one zoning district in the City. The BQ zone is suitable to include permanent emergency shelters as a permitted use, and has historically allowed for rotating emergency shelters. Other uses currently permitted in the BQ zone with a conditional use permit include religious, civic, and comparable organizations, public utility companies, lodges, country clubs, child care facilities, residential care facilities, congregate residences, hospitals, and vocational and specialized schools. B-128 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 5.5: Summary of Priority Housing SItes - SCENARIO B Site Special Area/ Neighborhood General Plan/Zoning Max Density (DUA) Acres Realistic Capacity (units) Affordability Level Site B1 (Hamptons)North Vallco Park High Density P(Res) 99(a)12.44 750 Very Low/Low Site B2 (The Oaks Shopping Center) Heart of the City C/R P(CG, Res) 35 (b)7.9 235 Very Low/Low Site B3 (Marina Plaza)Heart of the City C/O/R P(CG, Res) 35 6.86 200 Very Low/Low Site B4 (Barry Swenson)Heart of the City C/O/R P(CG, Res) 25 0.55 11 Very Low/Low Site B5 (Glenbrook Apartments) Heart of the City Medium Density R3(10-20) 20 31.3 58 Very Low/Low Site B6 (Homestead Lanes and Adjacency) Homestead C/R (c) P(CG, Res) (c) 35 (c)5.1 132 Very Low/Low Total 64.24 1,386 Site B6 (Carl Berg property)North De Anza O/I/C/R P(CG, ML, Res) 25 7.98 169 Very Low/Low Total 87.31 1318 Notes: (a) A General Plan Amendement and zoning change will be ncessary to allow the increase in density from 85 to 99 units per acre on Site B1. (b) A General Plan Amendment and zoning change will be necessary to allow the increase in density from 30 to 35 units per acre on Site B2. (c) A General Plan Amendment and zoning change will be necessary to allow residential uses at 35 units per acre on Site B6. Existing zoning for Site B6 is P(Rec, Enter). (d) Realistic capacity reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent on Sites B1, B2, B3, B4, and B6. Realistic capacity of Site B5 is (d)reduced by 46 percent due to existing site constraints. (e) Identified capacity of sites that allow development densities of at least 20 units per acre are credited toward the lower-income RHNA based on State law. Pursuant to Government Code Section 65583.2(c)(3)(B), local governments may utilize “default” density standards to provide evidence that “appropriate zoning” is in place to support the development of housing for very-low and low-income households . The default density standard for Cupertino and other suburban jurisdictions in Santa Clara County is 20 dwelling units per acre (DUA) or more. (f) Realistic capacity for sites B1 and B5 represent net new units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 B-129 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) As discussed in the Needs Assessment, the 2013 Santa Clara County Homeless Survey identified 112 homeless individuals on the streets and in emergency shelters, transitional housing, and domestic violence shelters in the city of Cupertino. The homeless facilities in Cupertino have a capacity to house 20 individuals. As a result, there is a need to accommodate at least 92 more homeless individuals in the City. There are several underutilized parcels within the BQ zone that could accommodate a permanent emergency shelter that serves 92 or more individuals. In particular, a number of churches in BQ zones own more land than they currently use. Surplus lands owned by churches include large parking lots and recreational spaces like fields and tennis courts. There are at least five parcels with approximately 154,000 square feet of vacant land in the BQ zone that could accommodate a permanent emergency shelter. These sites range from 19,000 square feet to 50,000 square feet, with an average lot size of 31,000 square feet. Parcels of this size would be able to accommodate a permanent emergency shelter that meets the needs of Cupertino. Those parcels with surplus land area in the BQ zone are primarily located on or near Cupertino’s main arterial corridors, providing for easy access to public transportation and essential services. In total, 12 bus lines and 131 Table 5.6: Comparison of Sites and RHNA - Scenario B Income Category Sites Remaining RHNA Surplus/ Shortfall(+/-) Extremely Low and Very Low 1,386 356 Low --207 Moderate --196 Above Moderate --243 Total 1,386 1,002 +384 Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 B-130 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-131 bus stops serve the City of Cupertino. Numerous bus lines run along Stevens Creek Boulevard, providing connections to many destinations throughout Silicon Valley. West Valley Community Services, a nonprofit organization that provides homeless services, is located within 1.5 miles of these parcels. In addition, the Kaiser Santa Clara Medical Center is located within 2.5 miles of the parcels. Many of the City’s retail and personal services are concentrated along Cupertino’s major corridors. As such, the underutilized BQ parcels are appropriate locations for future emergency shelters. Opportunities for the conversion of existing buildings in the BQ zone into permanent emergency shelters is more limited because there are currently no vacant buildings in the zone. However, if vacancies arise within the BQ zones, rehabilitation and reuse for emergency shelters could be explored. Emergency homeless shelters are designated as a permitted use in the Quasi Public Building (BQ) zone. The ordinance includes the following emergency shelter operational regulations: • The number of occupants does not exceed 25 • Adequate supervision is provided • Fire safety regulations are met • A management plan is provided which includes a detailed operation plan • Shelter is available to any individual or household regardless of their ability to pay • Occupancy is limited to six months or less. Housing Element Strategy 22 states that the City will continue to facilitate housing opportunities for special needs persons by allowing emergency shelters as a permitted use in the “BQ” Quasi-Public zoning district. In addition, rotating homeless shelters are also permitted within existing church structures in the BQ zone under similar conditions. The operation period of rotating shelters cannot exceed two months in any one-year span at a single location. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) TRANSITIONAL AND SUPPORTIVE HOUSING Transitional housing is defined as rental housing for stays of at least six months but where the units are re-circulated to another program recipient after a set period. Supportive housing has no limit on the length of stay, and is linked to onsite or offsite services. Senate Bill 2 clarified that transitional housing and supportive housing constitute residential uses. Zoning ordinances must treat transitional and supportive housing as a proposed residential use and subject only to those restrictions that apply to other residential uses of the same type in the same zone. In Cupertino, transitional and supportive housing developments are treated as residential land uses subject to the same approval process and development standards as other residential uses. The Zoning Code lists transitional and supportive housing as a permitted use in all zones allowing residential. These facilities are subject to the same development standards and permit processing criteria required for residential dwellings of the same type in the same zones. 5.9. FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR HOUSING The City of Cupertino has access to a variety of funding sources for affordable housing activities. These include programs from federal, state, local, and private resources. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) PROGRAM Through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides funds to local governments for funding a wide range of housing and community development activities for low-income persons. During the 2013 fiscal year, the City of Cupertino received $342,702 in CDBG funds. CDBG funds are used for public services, site acquisition, housing rehabilitation, and fair housing/housing counseling activities. HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (HOME) The City of Cupertino entered into a multi-city HOME Consortium with the County of Santa Clara. As such, developers of eligible affordable housing projects within the City of Cupertino can competitively apply annually to the County of Santa Clara for B-132 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-133 HOME Funds for City of Cupertino affordable housing projects. The initial program year in which HOME funds will become eligible to the City of Cupertino will begin July 1, 2015. Eligible HOME activities may include, but are not limited to acquisition, construction, rehabilitation and tenant based rental assistance (TBRA). REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY SET-ASIDE FUNDS Redevelopment Agency (RDA) housing set-aside funds, which used to be a primary local funding source for affordable housing, are no longer available to assist in new affordable housing development or acquisition/rehabilitation of existing units for conversion into affordable housing. This loss is associated with the Governor’s 2011 state budget revisions and subsequent court cases, and as a result, funding sources for affordable housing are significantly more constrained. Cupertino’s Redevelopment Agency dissolved as of February 1, 2012 according to state law. The City elected to become a Successor to the Redevelopment Agency (Successor Agency) in order to manage the wind-down of remaining contracts and obligations of the former Redevelopment Agency. The City does not have any available housing bond funds remaining from this source nor is it anticipated to receive program income in the future. LOW INCOME HOUSING TAX CREDITS (LIHTC) Created by the 1986 Tax Reform Act, the LIHTC program has been used in combination with City and other resources to encourage the construction and rehabilitation of rental housing for lower-income households. The program allows investors an annual tax credit over a 10-year period, provided that the housing meets the following minimum low-income occupancy requirements: 20 percent of the units must be affordable to households at 50 percent of AMI or 40 percent of the units must be affordable to those at 60 percent of AMI. The total credit over the 10-year period has a present value equal to 70 percent of the qualified construction and rehabilitation expenditure. The tax credit is typically sold to large investors at a syndication value. MORTGAGE CREDIT CERTIFICATE (MCC) PROGRAM The Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC) Program was created by the federal government, but the program is locally administered by the County of Santa Clara to assist first-time homebuyers in qualifying for a mortgage. The IRS allows eligible homebuyers with an MCC to take 20 percent of their annual mortgage APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) interest as a dollar-for-dollar tax credit against their federal personal income tax. This enables first-time homebuyers to qualify for a larger mortgage than otherwise possible, and thus can bring home ownership within reach. In 1987, the County of Santa Clara established an MCC Program that has since assisted over 200 low and moderate-income first time homebuyers in Cupertino to qualify for a mortgage. However, as housing prices continue to rise in Cupertino, use of MCC has become less feasible. During the last Housing Element period, the MCC Program assisted three Cupertino low- and moderate-income residents. HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER PROGRAM The Housing Choice Voucher Program (formerly known as Section 8 Rental Assistance) is a federal program that provides rental assistance to very-low income persons in need of affordable housing. This program offers a voucher that pays the difference between the current fair market rent and what a tenant can afford to pay (e.g. 30 percent of their income). The voucher allows a tenant to choose housing that may cost above the payment standard but the tenant must pay the extra cost. HOUSING TRUST SILICON VALLEY Housing Trust Silicon Valley provides loans and grants to increase the supply of affordable housing, assist first-time homebuyers, prevent homelessness and stabilize neighborhoods. The Housing Trust’s Affordable Housing Growth Fund intakes funds from local jurisdictions and provides matching grants for predevelopment activities, acquisition, and construction and rehabilitation of multi-family affordable housing developments. The City of Cupertino has contributed to the Fund through its former Redevelopment Agency. BELOW MARKET RATE (BMR) AFFORDABLE HOUSING FUND (AHF) The City of Cupertino has a Below Market Rate Affordable Housing Fund that provides financial assistance to affordable housing projects, programs and services. The City requires payment of an Office and Industrial Mitigation fee, which is assessed on developers of office and industrial space and a Housing Mitigation fee, which is assessed on developers of market-rate rental housing to mitigate the need for affordable housing created by new development. Developers B-134 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-135 of for-sale housing with six or fewer units are required to pay the Housing Mitigation fee. Developers of market-rate rental units, where the units cannot be sold individually, must pay the Housing Mitigation fee to the Affordable Housing Trust Fund to be consistent with recent court decisions and the State Costa- Hawkins Act regarding rent control. All affordable housing mitigation fees are deposited into the City’s Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF). Recent funding activities have included loans and grants to non-profit developers for acquisition and rehabilitation activities and public services such as landlord/ tenant mediation services provided through Project Sentinel, and assistance to very low income persons and families provided through West Valley Community Services. As of 2014, there is approximately $7 million in the BMR Affordable Housing Fund. GENERAL FUND HUMAN SERVICE GRANTS (HSG) PROGRAM Annually, the City of Cupertino provides approximately $40,000 to non-profit agencies providing needed services to Cupertino residents. HSG Program funds are proposed to be allocated on a competitive basis toward eligible public service activities. Recent recipients have used the funds to provide transitional housing for domestic violence victim, senior adult day care services and legal assistance services to seniors. 6. ANALYSIS OF CONSISTENCY WITH GENERAL PLAN The City’s various General Plan components were reviewed to evaluate their consistency with the policies and strategies outlined in the Housing Element Update. The following section summarizes the goals of each General Plan element and identifies supporting Housing Element policies and strategies. This analysis demonstrates that the policies and strategies of this Housing Element provide consistency with the policies set forth in the General Plan and its associated elements. When amendments are made to the safety, conservation, land use, or other elements of the City’s General Plan, the housing element will be reviewed for internal consistency. 6.1. LAND USE/COMMUNITY DESIGN GOALS • Create a cohesive, connected community with a distinctive center and an identifiable edge APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) • Ensure a compact community boundary that allows efficient delivery of municipal services • Establish a high sense of identity and community character • Maintain a thriving and balanced community • Promote thriving and diverse businesses that bring economic vitality to the community, while balancing housing, traffic and community character impacts • Protect hillsides and promote regional planning coordination • Expand City-wide access to community facilities and services • Protect historically and archaeologically significant structures, sites and artifacts • Promote a civic environment where the arts express an innovative spirit, celebrate a rich cultural diversity and inspire individual and community participation • Create a full range of park and recreational resources that link the community, provide outdoor recreation, preserve natural resources and support public health and safety SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT POLICIES Policies HE-2, HE-3, HE-4, HE-5, and HE-13 SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT STRATEGIES HE Strategies 1 and 26 6.2. CIRCULATION GOALS • Advocate for regional transportation planning decisions that support and complement the needs of Cupertino • Increase the use of public transit, carpools, bicycling, walking and telecommuting • Create a comprehensive network of pedestrian and bicycle routes and facilities • Increased the use of public transit service and encourage the development of new rapid transit service B-136 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-137 • Maintain roadway designs that accounts for the needs of motorists, pedestrians, bicycles and adjacent land uses • Minimize adverse traffic and circulation impacts on residential neighborhoods SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT POLICIES Policy HE-3 and HE-14 SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT STRATEGIES HE Strategies 3 and 26 6.3 ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES/SUSTAINABILITY GOALS • Ensure a sustainable future for the City of Cupertino • Reduce the use of non-renewable energy resources • Improve energy conservation and building efficiency • Maintain healthy air quality levels for the citizens of Cupertino through local planning efforts • Protect specific areas of natural vegetation and wildlife habitation to support a sustainable environment • Ensure mineral resource areas minimize community impacts and identify future uses • Ensure the protection and efficient use of water resources • Improve the quality of storm water runoff • Reduce locally produced solid waste in order to reduce energy, protect resources and meet or exceed state requirements APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) • Ensure adequate sewer capacity • Ensure adequate public infrastructure for existing uses and planned growth SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT POLICIES Policies HE-10 and HE-14 SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT STRATEGIES HE Strategies 20, 21 and 26 6.4 HEALTH AND SAFETY GOALS • Reduce hazard risks through regional coordination and mitigation planning • Reduce risks associated with geologic and seismic hazards • Protect the community from hazards associated with wildland and urban fires through efficient and effective fire and emergency services • Minimize the loss of life and property through appropriate fire prevention measures • Create an all-weather emergency road system to serve rural areas • Ensure available water service in the hillside and canyon areas • Ensure high quality police services that maintain the community’s low crime rate and ensure a high level of public safety • Protection people and property from the risks associated with hazardous materials and exposure to electromagnetic fields • Ensure a high level of emergency preparedness to cope with both natural or human-caused disasters • Protect people and property from risks associated with floods • Maintain a compatible noise environment for existing and future land uses B-138 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-139 • Reduce the noise impact from major streets and freeways on Cupertino residents • Protect residential areas as much as possible from intrusive non-traffic noise • Design buildings to minimize noise SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT POLICIES N/A SUPPORTING HOUSING ELEMENT STRATEGIES N/A 7. SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS 7.1 STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS Stakeholder interviews were conducted on December 11 and 12, 2013 to solicit input from stakeholders ranging from community members, property owners, housing developers, service providers, School Districts and the business community. The following agencies were invited to participate (bolded agencies and persons participated, totaling 25 people): • Advocates for a Better Cupertino • CARe (Cupertino Against Rezoning) • CCC (Concerned Citizens of Cupertino) • Cupertino Citizens for Fair Government (CCFG) • De Anza College • Silicon Valley Leadership Group • Cupertino Chamber of Commerce • Asian American Business Council • West Valley Community Services • League of Women Voters • HBANC (Bay Area Building Industry Association) APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) • Housing Choices Coalition • Organization of Special Needs Families • Silicon Valley Association of Realtors • Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County • Eden Council for Hope and Opportunity • Live Oak Adult Day Services • Maitri • Senior Adults Legal Assistance (SALA) • Rotary Club • Rebuilding Together Silicon Valley • Senior Housing Solutions • Charities Housing • YWCA Silicon Valley-Support Network Department • United Way Silicon Valley • Outreach and Escort • Santa Clara Family Health Foundation • Support Network for Battered Women • Institute for Age-Friendly Housing • Senior Citizens Commission • Santa Clara County Council of Churches • Mid Pen Housing • Habitat For Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley • Chinese American Realtors Association • Fremont Union High School District • Cupertino-Fremont Council of PTA • Cupertino Union School District B-140 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-141 • Modena Investments LP, Sunnyvale Holding LLC • Altos Enterprises Inc., Alpha Investments & Property Management Co. • LPMD Architects • Unaffiliated builders, lenders, and property owners A summary of common themes from the interviews is summarized below. All comments and ideas are reported in aggregate and not attributed to any individual or organization. HOUSING NEEDS • Overall housing affordability and the difference between housing demand and supply at all income levels • Need for diversity of affordable rental units at all income levels and all household types • Need to accommodate a growing aging population • Smaller units including innovative housing models (e.g. dorms/boarding houses, senior care homes, efficiency studios, shared & co-housing, micro units) COMMUNITY ACCEPTANCE Acceptance is low due to impacts on schools, privacy, parking, noise and traffic • Support for mixed use development in the style of Santana Row and Downtown Mountain View • Improved local governmental transparency and community development TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT • Developers and advocates felt that three to five story development is appropriate for adding units but community representatives are concerned about increased height of multi-family development APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) BARRIERS TO DEVELOPMENT OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING INCLUDE • Financial constraints, particularly due to the dissolution of Redevelopment Agencies and elimination of many federal and state funding sources and • Lack of community and political support for housing COMMUNITY AND BUSINESS GROUPS • Housing is a “choke point” in regional economy since it is hard to attract and retain employees in a highly competitive housing market • Several interviewees felt that private employers should be obligated to provide more resources to housing • Many felt that while employers feel concerned about schools and housing, they generally work to limit fees and taxes to businesses SCHOOL DISTRICTS • Schools in the northern part of the City are impacted due to higher student generation rates in existing housing while capacity in the south of the city is declining, likely due to aging households. • Capacity, where needed, is being expanded by adding new buildings or, preferably, temporary and modular units. • Currently using programs, centers and busing to distribute students • Reluctant to re-district since homeowners purchase homes based on the school service areas • Most of the Apple Campus 2 school impact fees will be allocated to the Santa Clara Unified School District while they expect that most employees who move to the area will reside within the CUSD service 7.2. REVIEW OF PREVIOUS HOUSING ELEMENT A thorough review of the City’s housing plan constitutes an important first step in updating the Cupertino Housing Element. This section provides an evaluation of the City’s progress towards achieving housing goals and objectives as set forth in the prior Housing Element, and analyzes the efficacy and appropriateness of the City’s housing policies and programs. This review forms a key basis for restructuring the City’s housing plan to meet the housing needs of the Cupertino B-142 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-143 community. Table 7.1 provides a detailed summary of the City’s progress in implementing the programs outlined in the 2007-2014 Housing Element and Table 7.2 summarizes the City’s progress toward its RHNA. In the 2007-2013 period, many factors restricted the development of lower income housing, including the dissolution of redevelopment agencies, diminished local, state, and federal funding, legal challenges against inclusionary housing policies, the Palmer decision invalidating inclusionary requirements for rental housing, and a depressed housing market for the majority of the planning period. As a result, affordable housing production statewide was seriously impacted. For example, at the State level, some affordable housing programs either did not issue Notices of Funding Availability (NOFAs) or the funding levels and grant award amounts were substantially diminished. At the federal level, CDBG and HOME funds have been consistently reduced over the last several years. According to ABAG, regionally, only 41 percent of the RHNA was met and only about 22 percent of the lower income RHNA was met. Furthermore, the majority of the lower income units were constructed in San Francisco and in the cities of Oakland and San Jose. Despite the challenges with funding limitations, market conditions, and legal constraints, the City of Cupertino remains committed to affordable housing. Given the competitive nature of affordable housing funding at the State and federal levels, generating local funding through its Housing Mitigation Program (Non- residential and Residential) is an important strategy to the City. The City is in the process of updating its Nexus Study, currently progressing on a fast track, with an anticipated adoption in 2015. The new Nexus Study would allow the City to continue to implement its Housing Mitigation Program and to impose reasonable and appropriate fees that reflect the local housing market conditions. 7.3. PARCEL-SPECIFIC SITES INVENTORY TABLE Local housing elements must identify sites that can accommodate the city’s share of the regional housing need as well as quantify the housing unit capacity of those sites. Moreover, the sites must be suitable, appropriate and available within the planning period to accommodate the housing needs of all income groups. The sites inventory must be presented on a parcel-specific basis. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-144 Cupertino’s sites inventory to meet the 2014-2022 RHNA allocation identifies a total of 1,400 units. Detailed information on each parcel included in the inventory is presented in Table 7.3 and Table 7.4 for both Scenario A and Scenario B. 7.4. COMMENT LETTER TO HCD During the 60-day HCD review period, one comment letter was submitted to HCD from the Law Foundation of Silicon Valley. The following responses provide information pertaining to each of the comments in the letter: COMMENT 1: THE HE FAILS TO ANALYZE CUPERTINO’S FAILURE TO PRODUCE AFFORDABLE UNITS DURING THE PAST PLANNING PERIOD. Local jurisdictions are obligated to identify adequate sites with appropriate densities and development standards to accommodate the RHNA. State Housing Element law recognizes that cities and counties do not have control over market conditions and often do not have adequate resources to produce the number of lower income units identified in the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA). The RHNA is a planning goal and not a production obligation for local jurisdictions. Despite the challenges with funding limitations, market conditions, and legal constraints, the City of Cupertino remains committed to affordable housing. The City has added additional information to address this comment on page B-159 of the Housing Element Appendix. COMMENT 2: THE HE SHOULD ADDRESS NON-GOVERNMENTAL CONSTRAINTS ON HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. While the Housing Element law specifies that local jurisdictions must evaluate non-governmental constraints on housing development, the law is also clear that local jurisdictions must “address and, where appropriate and legally possible, remove governmental constraints to the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing” [Gov’t Code 65583(c)(3)], but the same is not required for nongovernmental constraints. ECONOMIC DISPLACEMENT As a built out community, housing development in Cupertino has primarily occurred through recycling of existing underutilized commercial/mixed use properties. During the last Housing Element period, no housing project involving APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Goal B: Housing is Affordable for a Diversity of Cupertino Households Policy 2: Housing Mitigation Plan Program 4: Housing Mitigation Plan – Office and Industrial Mitigation Continue to implement Office and Industrial Mitigation fee program. Between 2007 and 2013, $1,195,414 had been collected through the Housing Mitigation Program (Office/Industrial and Residential) and deposited to the Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF). This program represents a key financing mechanism for affordable housing in Cupertino and is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 5: Housing Mitigation Program – Residential Mitigation Continue to implement the “Housing Mitigation” program to mitigate the need for affordable housing created by new market-rate residential development. Between 2007 and 2013, 20 Below Market Rate (BMR) units were created through the Residential Housing Mitigation Program: • 17 BMR rental units (Markham) • 3 BMR ownership units (Las Palmas) The City contracts with West Valley Community Services (WVCS) to administer the Below Market- Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Program which includes placing eligible households in the City’s BMR units. Between 2007 and 2013, $1,195,414 had been collected through the Housing Mitigation Program (Office/Industrial and Residential) and deposited to the City’s Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF). This program represents a key mechanism for affordable housing in Cupertino and is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 6: Affordable Housing Fund Provide financial assistance to affordable housing developments. Expend housing funds in the following manner: • Finance affordable housing projects. • Establish a down payment assistance plan that may be used in conjunction with the BMR program or to make market rate units more affordable. • Establish a rental subsidy program to make market rate units more affordable. Between 2007 and 2013, $1,195,414 had been collected through the Housing Mitigation Program (Office/Industrial and Residential) and deposited to the City’s Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF). These fun=ds were used to support affordable housing projects, programs and services such as: • Project Sentinel – Landlord/Tenant Mediation Services • West Valley Community Services (WVCS) – BMR Program Administration • 19935 Price Avenue – Acquisition of affordable housing residential rental property. However, the City did not establish a downpayment assistance program or a rental subsidy program. The City will continue to utilize the Below Market- Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF) to support affordable housing projects, programs and services. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element with a revised expanded list of potential eligible uses of funds. Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Goal A: An Adequate Supply of Residential Units for All Economic Segments Policy 1: Sufficiently Residentially Zoned Land for New Construction Need Program 1: Zoning and Land Use Designations Rezone one property (APN: 326-10-046) of 7.98 acres from 10 units per acre to 25 units per acre to accommodate up to 199 units. The City completed the rezoning of 7.98 acres of land from 10 du/ac to 25 du/ac in 2010. The City is currently updating the Land Use Element concurrent with the Housing Element update. The Land Use Element update will likely result in additional sites for residential and mixed use development to accommodate the fifth cycle RHNA of 1,064 units. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element to reflect the need to maintain an inventory of sites to accommodate the new RHNA of 1,064 units. Program 2: Second Dwelling Unit Ordinance Continue to implement ordinance to achieve 25 second units Between 2007 and 2013, 31 second units were constructed in the City. This program continues to be appropriate for the City and is proposed to be included in the 2014- 2022 Housing Element. Program 3: Encourage Lot Consolidation Continue to encourage lot consolidation through master plans. Provide technical assistance to property owners. The City continues to provide assistance to property owners regarding lot consolidation. This is an ongoing activity and is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Goal B: Housing is Affordable for a Diversity of Cupertino Households B-145 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Policy 3: Range of Housing Types Program 7: Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC) Program Participate in the countywide MCC program to assist one to two households annually. The County of Santa Clara continues to operate this program. However, given the high home prices in Cupertino, the potential of utilizing this program is limited. As of 2013, the maximum purchase price limits were $570,000 for resale properties and $630,000 for new units. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element as a new program – Referral to Housing Resources. Program 8: Move-In for Less Program Program is offered by the Apartments Association. This program offered by the Tri-County Apartment Association was discontinued in 2010. This program is proposed to be removed from the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 9: Surplus Property for Housing Explore opportunities on surplus properties as follows: • In conjunction with local public agencies, school districts and churches, develop a list of surplus property or underutilized property that have the potential for residential development. • Encourage long-term land leases of property from churches, school districts corporations for construction of affordable units. • Evaluate the feasibility of developing special housing for teachers or other employee groups on the surplus properties. • Review housing programs in neighboring school districts that assist teachers for applicability in Cupertino As part of the 2014-2022 Housing Element update and concurrent Land Use Element update, the City has explored and prioritized various vacant and underutilized properties with potential residential and mixed use development within the next eight years. These properties are included in the sites inventory for the Housing Element This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 10: Jobs/Housing Balance Program Require major new office/industrial development to build housing as part of new development projects. The City’s General Plan and 2007-2014 Housing Element offer adequate capacity to accommodate the City’s RHNA for the planning period. The City continues to implement its Housing Mitigation Program to enhance the jobs/housing balance in the community. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element as key elements of three new programs – Land Use Policy and Zoning Provisions, Housing Mitigation Plan – Office and Industrial Mitigation and Housing Mitigation Plan – Residential Mitigation. B-146 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Policy 4: Housing Rehabilitation Program 11: Affordable Housing Information and Support Provide information, resources and support to developers who can produce affordable housing The City continues to provide information, resources, and support to developers. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Policy 5: Development of Affordable Housing Program 12: Density Bonus Program Allow for a density bonus and additional concessions for development of 6 or more units that provide affordable housing for families and seniors As part of the 2015-2023 Housing Element update, the City is also amending its Zoning Code to revise the Density Bonus Ordinance to be consistent with State law. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. A new revised Density Bonus Ordinance was adopted in 2014. Program 13: Regulatory Incentives for Affordable Housing Provide regulatory incentives for affordable housing, such as waiving park dedication fees and construction tax for affordable units, or reducing parking requirement for mixed use developments. The City continues to waive park dedication fees and provide parking ordinance waivers for affordable developments. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 14: Extremely Low Income Housing Encourage the development of adequate housing to meet the needs of extremely low-income households by providing assistance and funding for affordable housing developments The City continues to support the development of housing affordable to extremely low income households. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. The proposed revision will include Housing for Persons with Special Needs to be added to this program. Program 15: Residential and Mixed Use Opportunities in or Near Employment Centers Encourage mixed use development and the use of shared parking facilities in or near employment centers. Evaluate the possibility of allowing residential development above existing parking areas. As part of the 2015-2023 Housing Element update and concurrent Land Use Element update, the City has explored and prioritized various vacant and underutilized properties with potential residential and mixed use development within the next eight years. These properties are included in the sites inventory for the Housing Element. This program is proposed to be added as a policy statement to Goal A: An Adequate Supply of Residential Units for All Economic Segments for the 2014-2022 Housing Element to encourage mixed use development. B-147 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Program 16: Expedited Permit Procedures Expedite permit processing for housing developments that contain at least 20 percent of units for lower-income households, or 10 percent of units for very low-income households, or 50 percent of units for senior citizens. The City continues of offer expedited permit processing for affordable housing projects meeting the State Density Bonus requirements. This program is proposed to be included but revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element as a new program - Incentives for Affordable Housing Development Policy 6: Tax Increment Funds Program 17: Redevelopment Housing Set Aside Fund Develop policies and objectives for the use of those Low and Moderate Income Housing Funds. The Redevelopment Agency was dissolved in 2012, pursuant to AB1X26 and AB1X27. Program is proposed to be removed from the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Policy 7: Housing Densities Program 18: Flexible Residential Standards Allow flexible residential development standards in planned residential zoning districts, such as smaller lot sizes, lot widths, floor area ratios and setbacks, particularly for higher density and attached housing developments. The City continues to offer flexible development standards. Policy 7 and this program are proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element under Goal A to facilitate a range of housing options in the community. Program 19: Residential Development Exceeding Maximums Allow residential developments to exceed planned density maximums if they provide special needs housing The City continues to provide this regulatory incentive to facilitate affordable housing for persons with special needs. However, no development utilized this incentive between 2007 and 2013. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element as part of a new program – Housing for Extremely Low Income Households and Persons with Special Needs Program 20: Monitor R-3 Development Standards Monitor the R-3 development standards on a regular basis to ensure that the requirements do not constrain new housing production. The City continues to monitor its development standards. Future residential development is likely to focus in mixed use areas in the City. As part of the Land Use Element update process conducted concurrent with the Housing Element update, the City reviewed and proposed modifications to development standards to facilitate multi-family and mixed use development. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element as part of a new program – Land Use Policy and Zoning Provisions. B-148 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Program 21: Clarify Language of Planned Development (P) District Amend the zoning ordinance to clarify that residential development in P (Res/R3) zones will require a planned development permit and not a conditional use permit. The Zoning Ordinance was amended in 2010 to clarify that residential development in the P (Res/ R3) zones require a planned development permit. This program was completed in 2010 and is proposed to be removed from the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Goal C: Enhance Residential Neighborhoods Policy 8: Maintenance and Repair Program 22: Apartment Acquisition and Rehabilitation Provide financial assistance to eligible very low and low-income homeowners to rehabilitate their housing units. The City continues to assist non-profits with the acquisition and rehabilitation of affordable housing units such as: • Maitri Transitional Housing Rehabilitation: CDBG funds were used to rehabilitate this four-unit transitional housing for victims of domestic violence. Project was completed in 2010. • Senior Housing Solutions – 19935 Price Avenue: Acquisition and rehabilitation of this property using the Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF) and Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds and was completed in 2011. This home is now occupied by five low income seniors. Preserving and improving the quality of housing for lower income households is important to the City. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element to incorporate both rehabilitation efforts for both single-family and multi-family rehabilitation. Policy 9: Conservation of Housing Stock Program 23: Preservation of “At Risk Units” Monitor owners of at-risk projects on an ongoing basis to determine their interest in selling, prepaying, terminating or continuing participation in a subsidy program. Work with owners, tenants, and nonprofit organizations to assist in the nonprofit acquisition of at-risk projects to ensure long-term affordability of developments where appropriate. The City did not experience a loss of any “at risk” affordable units converting to market-rate during the planning period The City works to preserve its affordable housing stock. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 24: Condominium Conversions Continue to implement to Condominium Conversion Ordinance. The City continues to implement the Condominium Conversion Ordinance. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. B-149 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Program 25: Rental Housing Preservation Program Develop and adopt a program that would grant approval only if at least two of the following three circumstances exist: • The project will comply with the City’s BMR Program based on the actual number of new units constructed, not the net number of units; and/or • The number of rental units to be provided on the site is at least equal to the number of existing rental units; and/or • No less than 20 percent of the units will comply with the City’s BMR Program. The City has explored the extent to which the proposed Rental Housing Preservation Program is consistent with State laws such as the Ellis Act and the Costa Hawkins Act. The City will continue to explore the extent to which existing rental housing can be preserved consistent with State law as part of the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 26: Conservation and Maintenance of Affordable Housing Develop a program to encourage the maintenance and rehabilitation of residential structures to preserve the older, more affordable housing stock. The City contracts with Rebuilding Together Silicon Valley (RTSV) to provide home safety repairs and mobility/ accessibility improvements to income- qualified owner-occupants using CDBG funds. The focus of this program is on the correction of safety hazards. Between 2007 and 2013, 31 households were assisted through this program. The City recognizes the importance of maintaining and improving its existing housing stock. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element as a new program - Residential Rehabilitation. Program 27: Neighborhood and Community Clean Up Campaigns Continue to encourage and sponsor neighborhood and community clean up campaigns for both public and private properties. The Environmental Services division organizes an annual city-wide garage sale to encourage reuse of items which ordinarily might end up in the landfill. Also, the division organizes community creek clean-up campaigns. This is an ongoing program and is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Policy 10: Energy Conservation Program 28: Energy Conservation Opportunities Continue to enforce Title 24 requirements for energy conservation and evaluate utilizing suggestions as identified in the Environmental Resources/Sustainability element. The City continues to enforce Title 24. This is a function of the Building Division and is proposed to be included as a separate housing program in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. B-150 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program WAccomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Program 29: Fee Waivers or Reduction for Energy Conservation Evaluate and implement the potential to provide incentives, such as waiving or reducing fees, for energy conservation improvements to residential units (existing or new). The City adopted a Green Building Ordinance in 2013 to facilitate energy conservation efforts. Residential and nonresidential new construction, addition, and renovation are required to comply with the Green Building Ordinance. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 30: Energy Efficiency Audits Offer free energy efficiency audits for residential units under a contract with Acterra. Energy audits were offered through an ARRA grant by the Public Information Office through a contract with Actera. The ARRA program expired in 2012. This program is proposed to be removed from the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Program 31: Energy Conservation in Residential Development Continue to encourage energy efficient residential development and provide technical assistance to developers who are interested in incorporating energy efficient design elements into their program. The City also adopted a Green Building Ordinance in 2012 to encourage energy conservation efforts. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Goal D: Services for Special Needs Households Policy 11: Special Needs Households Program 32: Emergency Shelters Revise the Zoning Ordinance to allow permanent emergency shelter facilities in “BQ” Quasi-Public zoning districts as a permitted use. The City revised the Zoning Ordinance in 2010 to permit emergency shelters in the “BQ” Quasi- Public zoning districts as a permitted use. The City updated the Zoning Ordinance in 2014 to remove the requirement that emergency shelters be located in churches. A program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element to continue to facilitate this type of housing. Program 33: Rotating Homeless Shelter Continue to support the rotating emergency shelter operated by West Valley Community Services West Valley Community Services (WVCS) successfully managed the Rotating Shelter Program for 18 years. The Rotating Shelter Program is now operated through Faith in Action Silicon Valley. The City recognizes the critical need to provide homeless prevention and emergency shelter services for the homeless in the region. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014- 2022 Housing Element. Program 34: Transitional and Supportive Housing Amend its zoning ordinance to comply with the requirements of SB2. Transitional and supportive housing will be treated as residential uses and be subject to the same development standards and restrictions that apply to similar housing types in the same zone. The City revised the Zoning Ordinance in 2010 to provide transition and supportive housing as a residential use to be permitted in similar manners as similar uses in the same zones. In 2008, the City contributed $800,000 to Maitri, a non-profit agency providing transitional housing to victims of domestic violence, for the purchase of a four-plex in Cupertino. The project was completed in 2010. The Zoning Ordinance amendment program was completed in 2010. This program is proposed to be removed from the 2014-2022 Housing Element. B-151 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.1: Summary of Accomplishments of 2007-2014 Housing Element Implementation Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Goals, Policies and Programs 2007-2014 Housing Element Program Accomplishments Continued Appropriateness for 2014-2022 Housing Element Program 35: Catholic Social Services (Single Parents) Provide help, Catholic Social Services, to place single parents in shared housing situations through the Santa Clara County Urban County programs. Catholic Charities continues to provide the shared housing services through the Urban County CDBG program. The City will continue to provide a range of supportive services to its residents, especially those with special needs, in order to foster a suitable living environment. A new program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014- 2022 Housing Element to reflect the range of services that may be supported by the City. Program 36: Flexible Parking Standards Consider granting reductions in off-street parking on a case-by-case basis for senior housing. The City continues to offer reductions in parking requirements on a case-by-case basis for senior housing. However, no new senior housing project was developed between 2007 and 2013. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Goal E: Equal Access to Housing Opportunities Policy 12: Housing Discrimination Program 37: Santa Clara County Fair Housing Consortium Distribute fair housing materials at all public facilities throughout the City and also has a booth at public events to distribute materials. The City continues to participate in the Fair Housing Consortium. Fair housing materials distributed by various organizations are available at public counters. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element Program 38: Fair Housing Outreach Continue to contract with ECHO Housing to provide fair housing outreach services. The City continues to contract with Eden Council for Hope and Opportunity (ECHO) to provide fair housing services, including outreach and education, counseling, and investigation of fair housing complaints. Also Project Sentinel provides tenant/landlord mediation services under contract for the City. This program is proposed to be included in the 2014-2022 Housing Element as a new program - Fair Housing Services. Program 39: Reasonable Accommodation Ordinance Adopt a written reasonable accommodation ordinance to provide persons with disabilities exceptions in zoning and land-use for housing. The City adopted the Reasonable Accommodation Ordinance in 2010 This program was completed in 2010 and is proposed to be removed from the 2014-2022 Housing Element. Goal F: Coordination with Local School Districts Policy 13: Coordination with Local School Districts Program 40: Coordination with Local School Districts Form a new committee of key staff from the City and the school districts to meet on a bi-monthly basis or as needed to review City planning initiatives, development proposals and School capital facilities and operating plans. City staff continues to meet with the school districts to discuss facility needs. However, no formal committee was established. The City recognizes the importance of addressing development impacts on the school districts. This program is proposed to be included and revised in the 2014-2022 Housing Element. In addition, the proposed new revised program will reflect coordination with other agencies, organizations, and neighboring jurisdictions to address regional housing issues. B-152 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.2: Progress Toward RHNA, 2007-2013 Very Low Low Moderate Above Moderate Total RHNA 341 229 243 357 1170 Construction 25 23 27 587 662 % of RHNA 7.3%10.0%11.1%164.4%56.6% Sources: City of Cupertino, 2014; ABAG, 2014 B-153 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-154 Table 7.3: Residential Sites Inventory to Meet the 2014 RHNA - Scenario A Site Identifier APN Adopted General Plan Adopted Zoning Max Allowable Density (DUA) Size (Acres) Realistic Capacity A1: The Hamptons 316 06 032 High Density P(Res)85 6.33 600A1: The Hamptons 316 06 037 High Density P(Res)85 6.11 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 107 Regional Shopping/Office/ Residential P(Regional Shopping) and P(CG) Zoning to be determined by Specific Plan to allow residential uses. 35 58.7 389 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 080 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 081 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 088 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 101 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 106 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 104 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 105 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 100 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 099 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 092 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 094 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 095 35 A2: Vallco Shopping District 316 20 082 35 A3: Oaks Shopping Center 326 27 040 Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)30 0.64 200 A3: Oaks Shopping Center 326 27 039 Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)30 5.40 A3: Oaks Shopping Center common area Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)30 0.72 A3: Oaks Shopping Center 326 27 041 Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)30 1.20 A4: Marina Plaza 326 34 066 Commercial/Office/Residential P(CG,Res)35 6.86 200 A5: Barry Swenson Site 375 07 001 Commercial/Office/Residential P(CG,Res)25 0.55 11 Total 86.51 1,400 Note: Realistic capacity for Sites A1, A3, A4 and A5 reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent. Realistic capacity for Site A2 is the amount allocated to the site in the Housing Element; a specific plan will be required for Site A2 prior to any new development. Residential capacity for Site A1 reflects the net increase in units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-155 Table 7.3: Residential Sites Inventory to Meet the 2014 RHNA - Scenario A Site IdentifierAPNAdopted General PlanAdopted Zoning Max Allowable Density (DUA) Size (Acres) Realistic Capacity A1: The Hamptons316 06 032High Density P(Res)856.33 600A1: The Hamptons316 06 037High DensityP(Res)856.11 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 107 Regional Shopping/Office/ Residential P(Regional Shopping) and P(CG) Zoning to be determined by Specific Plan to allow residential uses. 35 58.7389 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 08035 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 08135 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 08835 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 10135 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 10635 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 10435 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 10535 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 10035 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 09935 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 09235 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 09435 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 09535 A2: Vallco Shopping District316 20 08235 A3: Oaks Shopping Center326 27 040Commercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)300.64 200 A3: Oaks Shopping Center326 27 039Commercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)305.40 A3: Oaks Shopping Centercommon areaCommercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)300.72 A3: Oaks Shopping Center326 27 041Commercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)301.20 A4: Marina Plaza326 34 066Commercial/Office/ResidentialP(CG,Res)356.86200 A5: Barry Swenson Site375 07 001Commercial/Office/ResidentialP(CG,Res)250.5511 Total86.511,400 Note: Realistic capacity for Sites A1, A3, A4 and A5 reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent. Realistic capacity for Site A2 is the amount allocated to the site in the Housing Element; a specific plan will be required for Site A2 prior to any new development. Residential capacity for Site A1 reflects the net increase in units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 Table 7.3: Residential Sites Inventory to Meet the 2014 RHNA - Scenario A (CONTINUED) Site Identifier Infrastructure Capacity Current Use PDA Potential CEQA Streamlining A1: The Hamptons Yes Multi family housing ---- A1: The Hamptons Yes Multi family housing ---- A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center, parking --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center, parking --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center, parking --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Parking --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center, parking --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center --Plan EIR A2: Vallco Shopping District Yes Shopping center, parking --Plan EIR A3: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Parking VTA PDA Plan EIR A3: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Shopping center VTA PDA Plan EIR A3: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Shopping center VTA PDA Plan EIR A3: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Parking VTA PDA Plan EIR A4: Marina Plaza Yes Shopping center VTA PDA Plan EIR A5: Barry Swenson Site Yes Vacant VTA PDA Plan EIR Note: Realistic capacity for Sites A1, A3, A4 and A5 reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent. Realistic capacity for Site A2 is the amount allocated to the site in the Housing Element; a specific plan will be required for Site A2 prior to any new development. Residential capacity for Site A1 reflects the net increase in units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.4: Residential Sites Inventory to Meet the 2014 RHNA - Scenario B Site Identifier APN General Plan Zoning Max Allowable Density (DUA) Size (Acres) Realistic Capacity B1: The Hamptons 316 06 032 High Density P(Res)99(a)6.33 750 B1: The Hamptons 316 06 037 High Density P(Res)99 (a)6.11 B2: Oaks Shopping Center 326 27 040 Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)35 (b)0.64 235 B2: Oaks Shopping Center 326 27 039 Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)35 (b)5.40 B2: Oaks Shopping Center common area Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)35 (b)0.72 B2: Oaks Shopping Center 326 27 041 Commercial/Residential P(CG,Res)35 (b)1.20 B3: Marina Plaza 326 34 066 Commercial/Office/Residential P(CG,Res)35 6.86 200 B4: Barry Swenson Site 375 07 001 Commercial/Office/Residential P(CG,Res)25 0.55 11 B5: Glenbrook Apartments 326 27 036 Medium Density R3(10-20)20 11.62 58 B5: Glenbrook Apartments 326 27 037 Medium Density R3(10-20)20 19.72 B6: Homestead Lanes 326 09 061 Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)1.13 132 B6: Homestead Lanes 326 09 051 Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)0.48 B6: Homestead Lanes 326 09 052 Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)0.74 B6: Homestead Lanes 326 09 060 Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)2.74 Total 64.24 1,386 Note: (a) A General Plan Amendement and zoning change will be ncessary to allow the increase in density from 85 to 99 units per acre on Site B1. (b) A General Plan Amendment and zoning change will be necessary to allow the increase in density from 30 to 35 units per acre on Site B2. (c) A General Plan Amendment and zoning change will be necessary to allow residential uses at 35 units per acre on Site B6. Existing Zoning for this site is P(Rec, Enter) (d) Realistic capacity reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent on Sites B1, B2, B3, B4, and B6. Realistic capacity of Site B5 is reduced by 46 percent due to existing site constraints. (e) Residential capacity for Sites B1 and B5 reflect the net increase in units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 B-156 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) Table 7.4: Residential Sites Inventory to Meet the 2014 RHNA - Scenario B Site IdentifierAPNGeneral PlanZoning Max Allowable Density (DUA) Size (Acres) Realistic Capacity B1: The Hamptons316 06 032High Density P(Res)99(a)6.33 750 B1: The Hamptons316 06 037High DensityP(Res)99 (a)6.11 B2: Oaks Shopping Center326 27 040Commercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)35 (b)0.64 235 B2: Oaks Shopping Center326 27 039Commercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)35 (b)5.40 B2: Oaks Shopping Centercommon areaCommercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)35 (b)0.72 B2: Oaks Shopping Center326 27 041Commercial/ResidentialP(CG,Res)35 (b)1.20 B3: Marina Plaza326 34 066Commercial/Office/ResidentialP(CG,Res)356.86200 B4: Barry Swenson Site375 07 001Commercial/Office/ResidentialP(CG,Res)250.5511 B5: Glenbrook Apartments326 27 036Medium DensityR3(10-20)2011.62 58 B5: Glenbrook Apartments326 27 037Medium DensityR3(10-20)2019.72 B6: Homestead Lanes326 09 061Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)1.13 132 B6: Homestead Lanes326 09 051Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)0.48 B6: Homestead Lanes326 09 052Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)0.74 B6: Homestead Lanes326 09 060Commercial/Residential (c)P(CG,Res) (c)35 (c)2.74 Total64.241,386 Note: (a) A General Plan Amendement and zoning change will be ncessary to allow the increase in density from 85 to 99 units per acre on Site B1. (b) A General Plan Amendment and zoning change will be necessary to allow the increase in density from 30 to 35 units per acre on Site B2. (c) A General Plan Amendment and zoning change will be necessary to allow residential uses at 35 units per acre on Site B6. Existing Zoning for this site is P(Rec, Enter) (d) Realistic capacity reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent on Sites B1, B2, B3, B4, and B6. Realistic capacity of Site B5 is reduced by 46 percent due to existing site constraints. (e) Residential capacity for Sites B1 and B5 reflect the net increase in units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 Table 7.4: Residential Sites Inventory to Meet the 2014 RHNA - Scenario B (CONTINUED) Site Identifier Infrastructure Capacity Current Use PDA Potential CEQA Streamlining B1: The Hamptons Yes Multi family housing ---- B1: The Hamptons Yes Multi family housing ---- B2: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Parking VTA PDA Plan EIR B2: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Shopping center VTA PDA Plan EIR B2: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Shopping center VTA PDA Plan EIR B2: Oaks Shopping Center Yes Parking VTA PDA Plan EIR B3: Marina Plaza Yes Shopping center VTA PDA Plan EIR B4: Barry Swenson Site Yes Vacant VTA PDA Plan EIR B5: Glenbrook Apartments Yes Multi family housing --Plan EIR B5: Glenbrook Apartments Yes Multi family housing --Plan EIR B6: Homestead Lanes Yes Shopping center, parking ---- B6: Homestead Lanes Yes Restaurant ---- B6: Homestead Lanes Yes Shopping center, parking ---- B6: Homestead Lanes Yes Bowling alley, parking ---- Note: (a) A General Plan Amendement and zoning change will be ncessary to allow the increase in density from 85 to 99 units per acre on Site B1. (b) A General Plan Amendmen t and zoning change will be necessary to allow the increase in density from 30 to 35 units per acre on Site B2. (c) A General Plan Amendment and zoning change will be necessary to allow residential uses at 35 units per acre on Site B6. (d) Realistic capacity reduces the maximum developable units by 15 percent on Sites B1, B2, B3, B4, and B6. Realistic capacity of Site B5 is reduced by 46 percent due to existing site constraints. (e) Residential capacity for Sites B1 and B5 reflect the net increase in units. Source: City of Cupertino, 2014 B-157 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) the demolition of existing multi-family housing occurred, resulting in no direct displacement of existing residents. For the 2014-2022 Housing Element, future housing is expected to occur primarily on mixed use properties and by infilling existing residential developments. The Hamptons site is the only site with the potential to displace some existing tenants. The Hamptons has a total of 34 Below Market Rate (BMR) units within its development and has expressed to the City that they intend to maintain and preserve the 34 BMR units. Additionally, Strategy HE-3.3.4, Housing Preservation Program, provides that if a proposed development would cause a loss of multifamily housing, the development must comply with the City’s BMR program, provide at least as much housing in the new development as currently exists, and mitigate adverse impacts on displaced tenants. The City’s housing policies are designed to increase the supply of housing in the City so that the supply of housing can better meet the demand, and costs will, over time, be moderated. Policy HE-2.1, the City’s Housing Mitigation program, will ensure that each new residential and commercial development will either provide affordable housing or pay housing mitigation fees to increase the supply of affordable housing. The City has added additional information to address this comment on page HE-34 of the Housing Element, under Strategy HE-3.3.4 (Housing Preservation Program). COMMUNITY RESISTANCE TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING The 2014-2022 Housing Element was developed with extensive consultation with the community. The overall residential sites strategy, including priority and opportunity sites, was vetted through the public participation process and provides adequate capacity for the City’s new RHNA. Opposition to affordable housing typically focuses on concentration, density, and quality. The 2014-2022 Housing Element includes a program to address community opposition to affordable housing – the City’s well-received Housing Mitigation Program. With the funding generated by this program, the City has been able to provide assistance to the underserved segments of the community, including the elderly, disabled, and fist-time buyers. The City is in the process of updating the Nexus Study that supports the implementation of the Housing Mitigation Program. This update will enhance the effectiveness of the program and expected to be completed in 2015. B-158 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) COMMENT 3: THE HE’S QUANTIFIED OBJECTIVE AND PROGRAMS REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SPECIFICITY. PROGRAMS LACK MEANINGFUL TIMEFRAMES The Draft 2014-2022 Housing Element has been revised to provide additional specificity: • Strategy HE-2.3.3 (Below Market-Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Fund (AHF): clarified the time frame to solicit projects annually and updated the time frame for the Nexus Study (from 2016 to 2015). • Strategy HE-2.3.6 (Incentives for Affordable Housing Development): clarified the time frame to solicit projects annually. • Strategy HE-3.3.1 (Residential Rehabilitation): clarified the time frame to solicit projects annually. • Strategy HE-3.3.2 (Preservation of At-Risk Housing Units): added language related to conducting outreach to tenants of any potential conversion and available affordable housing assistance programs. The Housing Element has an eight-year planning period, with many programs to be implemented on an ongoing basis. Annually, through the City’s reporting to the State HCD on the implementation of the Housing Element, the City also makes necessary adjustments to ensure more effective implementation of Housing Element programs. INCLUDE AFFORDABLE HOUSING GOALS IN THE HEART OF CITY SPECIFIC PLAN Policy HE-2.1, the Residential Housing Mitigation Program, already establishes a citywide affordable housing goal of 15 percent. B-159 APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-160 STRENGTHEN STRATEGY HE-2.3.3 – NEXUS STUDY TO UPDATE MITIGATION FEES The City is expending significant resources in implementing its housing programs and commitments. Specifically, the City is fast tracking the update to the Nexus Study for the Housing Mitigation Program, with an anticipated adoption in 2015, and Strategy 8 has been revised to show that the Study will be completed in 2015. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-161 LAW FOUNDATION OF SILICON VALLEY              January 20, 2015 SENT VIA E-MAIL: hilda.sousa@hcd.ca.gov Hilda Sousa Housing and Policy Division Housing and Community Development 1800 3rd Street PO Box 952053 Sacramento, CA 94252-2053 Re: Comments on Cupertino’s Housing Element Dear Ms. Sousa: The following comments on the City of Cupertino’s (“City”) Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element (“Housing Element”) are offered by the Public Interest Law Firm and the Fair Housing Law Project (programs of the Law Foundation of Silicon Valley), Urban Habitat, West Valley Community Services, and Neighborhood Housing Services of Silicon Valley, on behalf of low-income residents of Cupertino. We also support the comments provided by Non-Profit Housing to HCD regarding Cupertino’s Housing Element. We appreciate your willingness to consider these comments during your review. The Housing Element fails to analyze Cupertino’s failure to produce affordable units during the past planning period. The draft Housing Element does not adequately analyze the progress and outcomes from the prior Housing Element, which was quite disappointing in some respects. Most prominently, during the prior planning period, production of affordable homes lagged far behind Cupertino’s RHNA for very low-, low- and moderate-income families. This failure was by a very large margin; only 25 of the 341 VLI units allocated to Cupertino—a woeful 7.3%—were created. The percentages are not substantially better for other lower-income categories; the City only met 10% of its allocation for low-income units, and 11.1% of its obligation for moderate income units1. There is no analysis as to why housing production in Cupertino for low-income individuals and families fell nearly 90% short of its affordable housing allocations under the past planning period’s RHNA.2 The Housing Element does not list the locations and addresses of the units that were developed during the planning period. HCD should require the City to do a better analysis of the progress and outcomes from the prior Housing Element and require that the City to analyze the reasons for the small number of units created during the last planning period, and to recommend programs that will encourage the development of affordable housing. The Housing Element should address non-governmental constraints on housing development. 1 Revised Public Draft Housing Element, 177. 2 Id. APPENDIX B: HOUSING ELEMENT TECHNICAL REPORT | general plan (community vision 2015 - 2040) B-162 2 Economic Displacement & Rent Burden We are greatly concerned with the economic displacement of low-income residents from the City of Cupertino. With no policies protecting low-income residents from rent increases or displacement, many low-income residents are being forced out of the City. As described in its Housing Element, the City has some of the highest rents in the area.3 The Housing Element has no analysis of the economic displacement of low-income individuals in Cupertino. We believe that this economic displacement is a pressing issue that is only superficially addressed in the Housing Element. The Housing Element should do a deeper analysis of the economic displacement and recommend policies that will prevent displacement of low-income residents. Community Resistance to Affordable Housing The Housing Element should include a program to address community resistance (NIMBYism --“Not-in-My-Back-Yard”) to the development of affordable housing in the City, and resistance to new housing in general. Many residents have spoken out against new development, and specifically against affordable housing.4 Although the City acknowledges NIMBYism as a constraint, the Housing Ele